Picture Gallery - Ships of the United States Navy

Picture Gallery - Ships of the United States Navy


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Ships of the United States Navy Picture and Map gallery

Galleries -Tanks -Royal Navy Ships -Japanese Ships -US Navy Ships -German Ships - RAF - USAAF -Maps

General Pictures

HMS Exeter and US Destroyers, 1934, Panama

American LSTs before D-Day

USS Galveston, USS Bainbridge and USS Saratoga, c.1914-16

Destroyer Evolution 1902-1920

Destroyer Evolution 1920-1944

Destroyer Evolution 1944-1955

Destroyer Evolution 1953-1962

Baback & Wilcox Boilers for Clemson Class Destroyers

US Destroyers at Chefoo, 1930s

Four Destroyers lost at Honda Point

Fitting out Clemson Class Destroyers, Bethlehem, San Francisco

Depth Charge explodes behind Coast Guard Cutter

Destroyer Divisions

Destroyer Division 22, 1919

Destroyer Division 27 at Venice, 3 April 1926

Destroyer Division 31 in 1921

Destroyer Division 36,San Diego, 18 February 1928

Alphabetical Order

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

A

USS Aaron Ward (DD-132) and USS Anthony (DD-172), early 1920s

USS Aeron Ward (DD-483) at New York, 1942

USS Aeron Ward (DD-483) and USS Buchanan (DD-484) being launched, 1941

USS Abbot (DD-184) and USS Brazos (AO-4), Guantanamo Bay

USS Abel P Upshur (DD-193), Norfolk Navy Yard, 26 January 1921

USS Alaska (CB-1) firing 5in Guns, 5 February 1945

Captain Kenneth H. Noble, USS Alaska (CB-1), 1945

40mm Handling Room, USS Alaska (CB-1)

USS Alaska (CB-1), 1944

USS Alaska (CB-1) from the left

USS Alden (DD-211) at Chefoo, 1 January 1937

USS Allen (DD-66) at sea off Hawaii, 1944

USS Allen (DD-66) at sea, 1918

Deck load of P-51 Mustangs on USS Altamaha (CVE-19)

USS Ammen (DD-35) and RMS Mauretania, New York, 1919

USS Ammen (DD-34), New York Naval Review 1911

USS Anderson (DD-411) at New York, 1939-40

USS Anderson (DD-411) underway in the Atlantic, 1941

USS Anthony (DD-172), Mare Island, 27 June 1919

FM-2 Wildcat on USS Anzio (CVE-57)

Combat Information Centre on USS Anzio (CVE-57)

TBF-1Cs and FM-1s on USS Anzio (CVE-57)

USS Anzio (CVE-57) at Shanghai, December 1945

USS Aaron Ward (DD-132) and USS Anthony (DD-172), early 1920s

Navy Airship C-7 over USS Arkansas (BB-33)

F-5L Flying Boat over USS Arkansas (BB-33)

Pearl Harbor: USS Arizona burning during the Pearl Harbor raid

USS Astoria (CA-34) at Long Beach, 1930s

1.1in AA guns on fantail of USS Astoria (CA-34)

USS Astoria (CL-90) at Mare Island, 21 October 1944

USS Astoria (CL-90), Mare Island, 1944

USS Atlanta (CL-51) under construction, 1 October 1941

USS Atlanta (CL-51) on trials, November 1941

USS Atlanta (CL-104) in 1948

USS Augusta (CA-31), Honolulu, 31 July 1933

USS Augusta (CA-31) from the air

USS Augusta (CA-31) on D-Day

USS Aylwin (DD-47) fires her Y-Guns

USS Aylwin (DD-355) at Mare Island, 1942

USS Aylwin (DD-355) at Philadelphia, 1935

USS Aylwin (DD-355) from above

B

USS Babbitt (DD-128) making smoke, 1920s

Radford (DD-120), Sproston (DD-173), Breese (DD-122), Badger (DD-126), Montgomery (DD-121)

USS Badger (DD-126) at Venice, 1919

USS Bagley (DD-185), Guantanamo Bay, 1920

USS Bagley (DD-386) underway, 1937-40

USS Bagley (DD-386) off Mare Island Navy Yard 1944

USS Bailey (DD-269), 1920s

USS Bailey (DD-492), Mare Island, 1944

USS Bainbridge (DD-1) Fitting Out, 1902

USS Bainbridge (DD-1) in Subic Bay, 1915

Crew of USS Bainbridge (DD-1) in Asiatic Waters

Forward 3in Gun, USS Bainbridge (DD-1)

Enclosed Bridge on USS Bainbridge (DD-246)

USS Bainbridge (DD-246) at sea, 23 July 1944

Depth Charge Racks on USS Bainbridge (DD-246)

USS Balch (DD-50), 1915-16

USS Balch (DD-363) from the right

USS Balch (DD-363) from the front, 1943

USS Balch (DD-363) from above and behind, 1943

USS Baldwin (DD-624) aground, Long Island, 1961

USS Ballard (DD-267) in European Waters, 1920

USS Ballard (AVD-10), Mare Island, 1942

Baltimore Class Cruiser in the Pacific

USS Baltimore (CA-68) with radar marked, 1943

USS Baltimore (CA-68) from above

USS Bancroft (DD-256) in 1940

USS Bancroft (DD-598) in the Bering Sea, 1942

USS Barker (DD-213) at Gonaives, Haiti, March 1928

USS Barker (DD-213) transfering prisoners from U-185 to USS Core (CVE-13)

Grumman TBF Avengers on USS Barnes (CVE-20)

Crew of USS Barnes (CVE-20), 1946

USS Barney (DD-149)

USS Barney (DD-149), 1930s

USS Barry (DD-2), fitting out 1902-3

USS Barry (DD-2) coaling at Cavite, c.1912

USS Barry (APD-29), 9 February 1945

USS Barry (DD-248) from the right

USS Barton (DD-599) newly commissioned, Boston, 1942

USS Beale (DD-40) in French Waters, 1918

USS Belknap (AVD-8) from USS Core (CVE-13)

USS Belknap (DD-251) at Boston, 1919

USS Bell (DD-95) and Curtiss NC-4, Azores, 1919

USS Downes (DD-45) and USS Benham (DD-49), 1921

USS Benham (DD-397) carrying survivors from Yorktown

Survivors from USS Benham (DD-397) on Espiritu Santo

USS Benham (DD-397), New York, 1939

USS Bernadou (DD-153), Charleston Navy Yard, 8 February 1945

USS Bernadou (DD-153) at Safi, 8 November 1942

USS Benson (DD-421) from above, 1943

USS Benson (DD-421) in Camo Measure 32 design 34D, 1944

USS Biddle (DD-151), Charleston Navy Yard, 22 October 1942

USS Biddle (DD-151) at New York, early 1920s

USS Flusser (DD-289), USS Billingsley (DD-293) and USS Dale (DD-290) at Venice

USS Billingsley (DD-293) firing her guns

USS Biloxi (CL-80) on shakedown cruise, October 1943

Officers and Crew of USS Biloxi (CL-80), October 1943

USS Birmingham fighting fires on USS Princeton

USS Birmingham (CL-62), Mare Island Navy Yard, 21 January 1945

USS Birmingham (CL-62) heading for wrecking yard, 1959

USS Blakeley (DD-150) with damaged bow, 1942

Port torpedo tubes, USS Blakey (DD-150), 1920s

USS Blakeley (DD-150), Charleston, 1945

P-47-D5 Thunderbolts in hanger of USS Block Island (CVE-21)

Island area of USS Block Island (CVE-21)

USS Block Island (CVE-21) fitting out at Seattle

USS Blue (DD-387) c.1937-40

USS Blue (DD-387) and USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) , Mare Island Navy Yard, 1942

Christening of USS Blue (DD-387) and USS Helm (DD-388)

USS Boggs (DD-136) at sea, 1936

USS Boggs (DD-136) Communications Room

USS Bogue (CVE-9) in Puget Sound

USS Bogue (CVE-9) from the right

Side view of USS Boise (CL-47)

USS Boise (CL-47), New York, 20 October 1945

Looking after from mast of USS Borie (DD-215), 1942

USS Borie (DD-215), 1920-21

USS Borie (DD-215) being bombed by aircraft from USS Card (CVE-13)

USS Trevor (DD-339) following USS Zane (DD-337) and USS Borie (DD-215), Alaska 1937

USS Boston (CA-69), 1943

USS Boston (CAG-1) during Operation Sea Dragon, 1968

USS Canberra (CAG-2) and USS Boston (CAG-1) at Norfolk, 1958

USS Boyle (DD-600), 19 October 1944

USS Branch (DD-197) under way, c.1920

USS Abbot (DD-184) and USS Brazos (AO-4), Guantanamo Bay

USS Breck (DD-283) at Toulon, 1927

USS Breckinridge (DD-148) at Spalato, 1919

USS Breckinridge (DD-148) off Charleston Navy Yard, 24 October 1943

Radford (DD-120), Sproston (DD-173), Breese (DD-122), Badger (DD-126), Montgomery (DD-121)

Joint launch of USS Gamble (DD-123) and USS Breese (DD-122), 1918

USS Bremerton (CA-130), 14 February 1952

USS Breton (CVE-23) at San Francisco, 1943

USS Breton (CVE-23) preparing to be scrapped

Changes to mast area on USS Breton (CVE-23), 1944

USS Bristol (DD-453) refueling from USS Brooklyn (CL-40) off Sicily

USS Brooklyn (CL-40) in the Hudson River, 1939

US Marines at 5in/ 40 broadside guns of USS Brooklyn (CL-40)

Supply Officer's Stateroom, USS Brooklyn (CL-40)

USS Brooks (DD-232) on her high speed trials

Commissioning Party for USS Broome

USS Broome (DD-210), Levensau Bridge, Kiel Canal, 1920

USS Broome (DD-210), c.1919-20

USS Bruce (DD-329) at Boston

Officers on Open Bridge of USS Bruce (DD-329)

USS Bruce (DD-329) at Portland Rose Festival

USS Buchanan (DD-131) laying smoke, c.1919-22

USS Buchanan (DD-484) refuels from USS Wasp (CV-7), 1942

Sicily seen under 40mm guns of USS Buck (DD-420)

LST invasion convoy for Sicily seen from USS Buck (DD-420)

Crew being briefed for Sicily on USS Buck (DD-420)

USS Buck (DD-420) signalling convoy, Sicily, July 1943

USS Buck (DD-420) in front of LST Convoy for Sicily

Expended 5in shells cases on USS Buck (DD-420)

Fire at Licata seen from USS Buck (DD-420)

Crew being briefed on fantail of USS Buck (DD-420), Sicily

Prisoners from Argento on USS Buck (DD-420)

Cleaning 5in gun on USS Buck (DD-420)

Expended shell cases after USS Buck (DD-42) sank the Argento

Treating wounded crewman from Argento on USS Buck (DD-420)

USS Bulmer (DD-222), early 1920s

Damage to side of USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)

Damage to deck of USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)

USS Wilkes Barre (CL-103) alongside Bunker Hill (CV-17)

Evacuating wounded from USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)

Firefighting on the deck of USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) on Fire

USS Burns (DM-11) with mines on deck, 1922-24

USS Burns (DD-171) on sea trials, Santa Barbara channel, 25 July 1919

USS Burrows (DD-29) at Brest, 27 October 2016

USS Burrows (DD-29) and USS Jenkins (DD-42) dressed with flags, 1919

USS Burrows (DD-29) dressed with flags, 1919

USS Little (DD-79), USS Jarvis (DD-38) and USS Burrows (DD-29), Brest, 1918

USS Bush (DD-166), Boston, 20 February 1919

C

USS Caldwell refueling, 27 February 1918

USS Caldwell (DD-69) in British Waters in 1918

USS Caldwell (DD-69) in Mackay Low Visibility Camo

USS Caldwell (DD-64) and troop transport Madawaka

Stern view of USS Caldwell, Mare Island, 1943

USS Canberra (CAG-2) and USS Boston (CAG-1) at Norfolk, 1958

USS Canberra (CA-70), 14 October 1943

Deck load of aircraft on USS Card (CVE-11)

USS Card (CVE-11) from the right, 1943

USS Carmick (DMS-33) at Pearl Harbor, 1950s

Launch Ceremony for USS Casablanca (CVE-55)

USS Casablanca (CVE-55) in Puget Sound, July 1943

USS Case (DD-285) underway

Front of Christmas Menu for USS Case (DD-285), 1926

Christmas Menu for USS Case (DD-285), 1926

USS Case (DD-370) seen from USS Sealine (DD-315)

USS Clark (DD-361), USS Case (DD-370), Cummings (DD-365), Shaw (DD-373) and Tucker (DD-374) , San Diego 1941

Damage suffered by USS Cassin (DD-43), 15 October 1917

USS Cassin (DD-43) at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston

USS Cassin (DD-43) and USS Tucker (DD-57), Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston

Crewmens mess on USS Cassin (DD-372)

USS Cassin (DD-372) after Pearl Harbor

USS Cassin (DD-372) and USS Downes (DD-375) after Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor: Wreck of USS Downes (DD-375) & Cassin (DD-372)

USS Champlin (DD-104) with aft gun moved, 1920s

USS Champlin (DD-104) on trials, 31 October 1918

USS Champlin (DD-601) leaving Boston Navy Yard, 1944

USS Chandler (DD-206), c.1919-20

USS Chandler (DD-206) at sea at time of Pearl Harbor

3in/50 Gun on USS Charger (CVE-30)

Sickbay Ward on USS Charger (CVE-30)

USS Charger (CVE-30), May 1942

Grumman F4F-4s Wildcats in the hanger of USS Charger (CVE-30)

Stern of USS Charger (CVE-30)

USS Charles Ausburn (DD-294) carrying a Naval Aircraft Factory TS-1 Floatplane

Naval Aircraft Factory TS-1 Floatplane on USS Charles Ausburn (DD-294)

USS Chase (DD-323) in somebody's wake

USS Chauncey (DD-3) at sea, pre First World War

USS Chauncey in floating dry dock, Olongapo, 1910

USS Chauncey (DD-296) in Dry Dock, 1918

Inside the bridge of USS Chauncey (DD-296)

USS Chauncey (DD-296) after breaking up

USS Howard (DMS-7) refueling from USS Chenango (ACV-28), 1942

USS Chenango (CVE-28) as an oiler

Deckload of P-40Fs on USS Chenango (CVE-28)

Hanger full of P-40Fs on USS Chenango (CVE-28)

Bows of USS Chenango (CVE-28), 1943

USS Chester (CA-27) in 1932-33

USS Chester (CA-27), Mare Island Navy Yard, 16 May 1945

USS Chew (DD-106) at sea, 2 August 1945

USS Chew (DD-106), Union Iron Works, 1918

USS Chicago (CA-29) being launched, 10 April 1930

USS Chicago (CA-29) at Sea

USS Chicago (CA-136), Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1945

USS Chicago (CA-136) being converted into guided missile cruiser

USS Childs (DD-241) during 1927 Presidential Review

USS Cincinnati (CL-6) at New York, 22 March 1944

Side view of USS Cincinnati (CL-6)

USS Clark (DD-361) at Sydney, 1941

USS Clark (DD-361), USS Case (DD-370), Cummings (DD-365), Shaw (DD-373) and Tucker (DD-374) , San Diego 1941

USS Claxton (DD-140), San Diego, 7 October 1932

USS Clemson (APD-31), Charleston, 1944

Captain's Inspection on USS Cleveland (CL-55), 28 March 1944

USS Cleveland (CL-55) under construction, 1 October 1941

USS Cohglan (DD-326) and USS Preston (DD-327) at Trieste

USS Preston (DD-327), Isherwood (DD-284) and Coghlan (DD-326), Puget Sound

USS Cole (DD-155) approaching Safi, 8 November 1942

USS Colhoun (DD-85) in dazzle camouflage, 1919

USS Colhoun (APD-2)

USS Colhoun (DD-85) and troop convoy, 1918

USS Colhoun (DD-85) escorting troop convoy, 1918

USS Columbia (CL-56), heading to Lingayen Gulf

USS Columbus (CG-12), 1974

USS Columbus (CA-74), 1954-55

Grumman J2F being lowered from USS Concord (CL-10)

USS Concord (CL-10) in Gulf of Panama, 1944

Plans of Connecticut and Vermont Class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships

Sponsor's Party, USS Conner (DD-72)

USS Converse (DD-291) testing a Flettner Rudder

USS Conyngham (DD-58), Boston, 11 February 1919

USS Conyngham (DD-58) at Sea, 1916

USS Conyngham (DD-371) transfers mail between destroyers

USS Conyngham (DD-371) at Pearl Harbor, 1946

USS Copahee (CVE-12) off Mare Island, 1943

Mess Attendants training on 20mm guns on USS Copahee (CVE-12)

Mk XIII aircraft torpedo on USS Copahee (CVE-12)

FM2 Wildcat crashes on USS Core (CVE-13)

Baka and Ki-67 Peggy on USS Core (CVE-13)

USS Core (CVE-13) in the Atlantic, 1943

Yokusuka P1Y 'Francis' misses USS Corregidor (CVE-58)

USS Corry (DD-334) being launched, 1921

USS Corry (DD-334) being dismantled

CO's Stateroom and Pantry, USS Corry (DD-334)

Berthing Space on USS Corry (DD-334)

USS Corry (DD-463) being towed after launch, 1941

USS Corry (DD-463) rescuing survivors from U-801

USS Cowell (DD-167), Boston Navy Yard, 19 March 1919

USS Crane (DD-109) in the Panama Canal, 1919

USS Craven (DD-70) celebrating the Armistice

Boiler for USS Craven (DD-70)

Crew of USS Craven (DD-382)

USS Craven (DD-382) at sea

USS Crosby (DD-164), Boston Navy Yard, 25 January 1919

USS Walker (DD-163), USS Crosby (DD-164), USS Thatcher (DD-162), Cuyama, USS Gamble (DD-123)

USS Crowninshield (DD-134) refueling from USS Saratoga (CV-3)

USS Cummings (DD-44) before First World War

USS Cummings (DD-44), 1919

USS Cummings (DD-44) making smoke, 1916

USS Cummings (DD-365) at sea, 1944

USS Cummings (DD-365) at San Diego, 1938

USS Clark (DD-361), USS Case (DD-370), Cummings (DD-365), Shaw (DD-373) and Tucker (DD-374) , San Diego 1941

USS Cushing (DD-55) on trials, 1955

USS Cushing (DD-376) at Mare Island, 1942

USS Cushing (DD-376) at San Diego, 1938

USS Cushing (DD-376) from above

USS Walker (DD-163), USS Crosby (DD-164), USS Thatcher (DD-162), Cuyama, USS Gamble (DD-123)

D

USS Dahlgren (DD-187), Philadelphia Navy Yard Dry Dock, May 1932

USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945

USS Dale (DD-4) in dry dock, Gibraltar, 1918

Crew Spaces in USS Dale (DD-4)

Port Engine Room, USS Dale (DD-4)

Main deck on USS Dale (DD-4)

USS Dale (DD-4) fitting out, 1902

Officers of USS Dale (DD-290), Venice, 1922

USS Flusser (DD-289), USS Billingsley (DD-293) and USS Dale (DD-290) at Venice

USS Dale (DD-353) from above, mid 1930s

USS Dale (DD-353) with the battle fleet, late 1930s

USS Monaghan (DD-354) and USS Dale (DD-353) emerge from smoke

USS Dallas (DD-199), 1934

USS Dallas (DD-199) at the Presidential Naval Review, 4 June 1927

USS Dallas (DD-199) in Wadi Sebou, 11 November 1942

USS Dallas (DD-199) approaching Juneau, Alaska, 1937

USS Davis (DD-65) after 1918 collision

USS Davis (DD-65) escorting USS George Washington, 1918

USS Davis (DD-395) from above, c.1944-45

USS Davison (DMS-37) in harbor, 1945

USS Dayton (CL-105) in 1945

USS Decatur (DD-5) on trials, 1902

18in torpedo on USS Decatur (DD-5)

USS Decatur (DD-341) underway, 1944

USS Decatur (DD-341) in colour, 1930s

USS Decatur (DD-341) at New York, 1943

Plans of Delaware Class Dreadnought Battleships

USS DeLong (DD-129), aground in Halfmoon Bay

Crew of USS Delphy (DD-261) besides their ship

USS Delphy (DD-261) being launched

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Dent (DD-116)

USS Stoddert (DD-302) and USS Dent (DD-116), c.1931

USS Dent (DD-116) during 1920s

USS Dent (DD-116) at sea, 1921

USS Denver (CL-58) from above

USS Denver (CL-58) from above

USS Detroit (CL-8), 10 January 1945

Band of USS Detroit (CL-8) 'crossing the line'

USS Dewey (DD-349) off San Diego, 14 September 1936

USS Dewey (DD-349) on her builder's trials

USS Dewey in port, 1935

USS Dickerson (DD-157), San Diego, early 1930s

USS Dickerson (APD-21), Chesapeake Bay, 3 October 1943

USS Dixie (AD-14) and USS Long (DD-209), 1940

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Dorsey (DD-117)

USS Dorsey (DMS-1) at sea, 1943

USS Dorsey (DD-117) at New York Fleet Review, 1934

USS Downes (DD-45), 1919

USS Downes (DD-45) and USS Benham (DD-49), 1921

Machinery Space on USS Downes (DD-375)

USS Downes (DD-375) underway 1938

USS Downes (DD-375) bombarding Marcus Island

Aft deckhouse on USS Downes (DD-375)

USS Downes (DD-375) at Mare Island, 1943

Pearl Harbor: Wreck of USS Downes (DD-375) & Cassin

USS Cassin (DD-372) and USS Downes (DD-375) after Pearl Harbor

USS Doyen (DD-280) from the left

USS Doyle (DMS-34), 1951

USS Drayton (DD-23), Boston Navy Yard, 1919

USS Drayton (DD-23) at New York

USS Drayton (DD-366) at Mare Island, 1944

USS Drayton (DD-366) on Trials, 1936

USS Drayton (DD-366) at Sea, 1938

USS Duluth (CL-87) off Norfolk, 11 December 1944

USS Duncan (DD-46) in the war zone, 1917

Completion Picture for USS Duncan (DD-485), 1942

USS Dunlap (DD-384) firing a torpedo

USS Dunlap (DD-384) recovers a torpedo

USS Dunlap (DD-384) on high speed trials

USS Du Pont (DD-152), Camo Measure 32, Pattern 3D, 6 October 1944

USS Du Pont (DD-152), 1930s

USS Osborne (DD-295), USS Gwin (DD-71) and USS DuPont (DD-152), Charleston, SC, 1920

Officers and Crews of USS Dyer (DD-84), Dardanelles, 1919

E

USS Eberle (DD-430) underway, 1940-41

USS Eberle (DD-430) being launched, 1940

USS Edison (DD-439) underway, 1942

Japanese picture of USS Edsall (DD-219) sinking, 1 March 1942

USS Edsall (DD-219) from the left

Refugees from Smyrna on USS Edsall (DD-219), 1922

USS Edwards (DD-619) at Port Newark Navy Day

USS Ellet (DD-398) during Naval Review, 1939

USS Ellet (DD-398) being delivered, 1939

Decommissioning Party for USS Elliot (DD-146), 21 September 1945

USS Elliot (DMS-4), Mare Island, 27 October 1942

USS Ellis (DD-154) with damaged bow, 1934

USS Ellyson (DD-454) at sea

USS Ellyson (DD-454) refueling from USS Santee (CVE-29), Operation Torch

USS Emmons (DD--457) in camo measure 12 modified, 1942

USS Endicott (DD-495), Naples Harbour, August 1944

USS Endicott (DD-495), late 1944

USS Monssen (DD-436) passing mail to USS Enterprise (CV-6)

USS Ericsson (DD-56/ CG-5) with US Coast Guard

USS Ericsson (DD-56) during 1916

USS Ericsson (DD-440) underway in 1941

USS Evans (DD-78) at San Diego, 1920s

F

USS Fairfax (DD-93) at anchor, 11 October 1919

USS Fairfax (DD-93) at Poughkeepsie, 17 June 1939

Crew of USS Fall River (CA-131) watch Able Day Atom Bomb, 1 July 1946

Prisoners from U-58 on USS Fanning (DD-37)

USS Fanning (DD-37) in wartime camouflage

USS Fanning (DD-37) with U-58, 17 November 1917

Crewman being transferred from USS Fanning (DD-385)

USS Fanning (DD-385) waiting for President Roosevelt

USS Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) from a blimp

USS Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) at Brisbane, 1944

USS Farenholt (DD-332) being launched

Crew of USS Farenholt (DD-332)

USS Farenholt (DD-491) signed by Arleigh Burke

Workmen salute USS Farenholt (DD-491), 1941

USS Fargo (CL-106) at Trieste, 29 June 1946

Mess Deck on USS Fargo (CL-106)

USS Farquhar (DD-304) at San Diego

Boat race crew from USS Farquhar (DD-304)

USS Farquhar (DD-304) and USS Relief (AH-1) in Panama Canal, 1927

USS Farragut (DD-300) in Dry Dock, 1925

Crew inspection on USS Farragut (DD-300)

USS Farragut (DD-300) rolling in heavy seas

Torpedoes for USS Farragut (DD-300) and USS Thompson (DD-305)

Somers (DD-301), Farragut (DD-300), John Francis Burns (DD-299), Percival (DD-298) and Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Fitch (DD-462) being launched, Boston, 14 June 1941

Radar setup on USS Flint (CL-97)

Commissioning Ceremony, USS Flint (CL-97), 31 August 1944

Parsons Turbines on USS Flusser (DD-20)

Engine Room controls on USS Flusser (DD-20)

USS Flusser (DD-20) on trials, c.1909

USS Flusser (DD-289), USS Billingsley (DD-293) and USS Dale (DD-290) at Venice

USS Flusser (DD-368) before the war

USS Flusser (DD-368) at Pearl Harbor, 1945

USS Flusser (DD-368) from above, 1942

USS Foote (DD-169) as HMS Roxburgh, Hampton Roads, 3 September 1942

USS Fox (DD-234) after collision with HMS Ceres, 1923

USS Fox (DD-234) underway in the 1920s or 1930s

USS Frankford (DD-497) at New Yor, 19 June 1945

Twin 5in gun turrets on USS Franklin (CV-13)

USS Franklin listing heavily, 1945

Crew of USS Franklin awaiting rescue

USS Frazier (DD-607), Mare Island

USS Fresno (CL-121) fitting out at New Jersey, 1946

USS Fuller (DD-297) underway

USS Fuller (DD-297) and USS Woodbury (DD-309) at Honda Point

G

USS Galveston (CL-93) being towed to Philadelphia Naval Yard, 1946

USS Galveston, USS Bainbridge and USS Saratoga, c.1914-16

USS Gambier Bay (CVE-73), April 1944

Bow-on view of USS Gambier Bay (CVE-73)

Joint launch of USS Gamble (DD-123) and USS Breese (DD-122), 1918

USS Walker (DD-163), USS Crosby (DD-164), USS Thatcher (DD-162), Cuyama, USS Gamble (DD-123)

USS Gamble (DD-123), c.1920

USS Gamble (DM-15), c.1940

USS Gansevoort (DD-608) at New York, 1945

USS George E Badger (APD-33), Leyte Gulf, 18 November 1944

USS George E Badger (DD-196), c.1920

USS Gillespie (DD-609) from the right, San Francisco, 1942

USS Gillespie (DD-609) from the front, San Francisco

USS Gillis (AVD-12) leaving a floating dry dock

Japanese POWs from Marpi Point on USS Gilmer (APD-11)

USS Gilmer (DD-233) in Port

USS Gilmer (APD-11) at Mare Island, 27 November 1944

USS Gilmer (APD-11) and USS Zellars (DD-777) at Okinawa, 30 March 1945

USS Gleaves (DD-423) being commissioned, 1940

USS Gleaves (DD-423) being launched, 1939

USS Glennon (DD-620) with stern damage, Normandy, 8 June 1944

USS Goff (DD-247) from the front

USS Goff (DD-247) in the Sea of Marmora, 1923

USS Goldsborough (DD-188), 1920

USS Goldsborough (APD-32), 1944

USS Graham (DD-192), Guantanamo Bay, 1920

Experimental Paint on USS Graham (DD-192)

Retouched picture of USS Grayson (DD-435)

USS Greene (APD-36) at Mers-el-Kebir, 1944

USS Greer (DD-145) in the North Atlantic, June 1943

USS Greer (DD-145) at New York, June 1943

USS Gregory (APD-3/ DD-82)

USS Gregory (DD-82), c.1918

USS Gridley (DD-92) in Dry Dock, 1919

USS Gridley (DD-380) from the right

Avengers and Wildcats on USS Guadalcanal (CVE-60)

Crew of U-505 being hosed down on USS Guadalcanal (CVE-60)

Combat Information Centre on USS Guadalcanal (CVE-60)

USS Maury (DD-401) refueling from USS Guadalupe (AO-32)

Side view of USS Guam

Diesel Room of USS Guam (CB-2)

USS Guam (CB-2) off Trinidad, 1944

USS Guam (CB-2) on shakedown cruise

USS Osborne (DD-295), USS Gwin (DD-71) and USS DuPont (DD-152), Charleston, SC, 1920

USS Gwin (DD-433) underway, 1941

USS Gwin (DD-433) newly commissioned, 1941

H

USS Hale (DD-133)

Torpedo damage to USS Hambleton (DD-455), November 1942

USS Hambleton (DD-455) and USS Rodman (DD-456) being launched, 1941

USS Hamilton (DD-141) at New York, 1939-40

USS Hamilton (DD-141) with forward torpedo tubes

USS Hammann (DD-412) at Charleston, 1942

USS Haraden (DD-183), Spalato, 1919

USS Lamson (DD-367) and USS Haraden (DD-585) with battle damage

USS Harding (DD-91), Port au Prince, Haiti, 1919 .

USS Hart (DD-110) dressed with flags, 1920

USS Hart (DD-110) under construction, Union Iron Works, 1918

USS Hatfield (DD-231) at San Diego, early 1930s

USS Hatfield (DD-231) in dry dock, 1932

Superstructure and Bridge of USS Hawaii (CB-3)

USS Hazelwood (DD-107) at San Diego, early 1920s

USS Hawaii (CB-3) being launched, 3 November 1945

USS Helena (CA-75) fires Regulus Missile, 1957

USS Helena (CA-75) bombarding Chongjin, 12-13 October 1950

USS Helena (CL-50), c.1940

USS Helm (DD-388), Mare Island Navy Yard, 1942

Christening of USS Blue (DD-387) and USS Helm (DD-388)

USS Helm (DD-388) alongside USS Makin Island (CVE-93) off Iwo Jima

USS Henley (DD-39) in 1912

USS Henley (DD-391) at sea, 2 May 1938

USS Henley (DD-391) at Mare Island Navy Yard 1937

USS Henley (DD-391), San Diego, 1938

USS Pompano (SS-181) and USS Henley (DD-391) under construction 1936

USS Henshaw (DD-278) making smoke

USS Herbert (APD-22) after being stricken, 1946

USS Herbert (DD-160), 1934

USS Herndon (DD-198) during Short Range Battle Practise, 1920s

USS Hilary P Jones (DD-427) being launched, 1939

USS Hilary P Jones (DD-427) in 1940

USS Hobby (DD-610) from the stern, San Francisco

Shell cases on USS Hobson (DD-464) after Utah Beach

USS Hobson (DD-464) at Charleston, 4 March 1942

USS Hogan (DMS-6) at Mare Island, 11 January 1944

The voyages of USS Hoggatt Bay (CVE-75)

USS Honolulu (CL-48), 1944

Colour Picture of USS Honolulu (CL-48), Spring 1944

USS Hopewell (DD-181) at anchor, 15 November 1919

USS Hopkins (DD-6), c.1904

USS Hopkins (DD-6) and USS Paul Jones (DD-10), 1918

USS Hopkins (DD-6) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 1907

USS Hopkins (DD-249) at Sea

Laundry day on USS Houston (CA-30), 1930s

USS Houston (CA-30) at Houston, late 1930s

USS Williamson (DD-244) and USS Hovey (DD-208), Panama Canal, 1930s

USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Hovey (DD-208) and USS Long (DD-209), Panama Canal, 24 April 1931

USS Hull, Lawrence, Hopkins, Whipple & Truxtun, 1907

USS Hornet prior to commissioning

USS Houston (CL-81), Norfolk Navy Yard, 11 January 1944

Aerial picture of USS Houston (CL-81), 12 January 1944

USS Hovey (DD-208) at Sea, 1 September 1932

USS Hovey (DD-208) rescues pilot of Grumman F3F

Twin 4"/50 breech from USS Hovey (DD-208) or USS Long (DD-209)

USS Howard (DD-179), c. 1921-22

USS Howard (DMS-7) refueling from USS Chenango (ACV-28), 1942

USS Hughes (DD-410) at Mare Island, 1942

Stern view of USS Hughes (DD-410), 1942

USS Hulbert (DD-342) with damaged bow, 1922

USS Hulbert (ADV-6) aground in Massacre Bay, 1943

USS Hulbert (DD-342) returns from Asiatic Waters, 1929

USS Hull (DD-7) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 1907

USS Hull (DD-7), c.1906-7

USS Hull, Lawrence, Hopkins, Whipple & Truxtun, 1907

Launch of USS Hull (DD-330)

USS Hull (DD-330) Underway

USS Hull (DD-350) at Mare Island, May 1942

USS Hull (DD-350) in the Aleutians, 1937

USS Hull (DD-350) refueling at sea, 1943

USS Humphreys (DD-236) refueling from the Lexington, 1934

USS Humphreys (APD-12) lowering a UDT at Okinawa

USS Humphreys (APD-12) at Leyte Gulf, 21 October 1944

USS Hunt (DD-194), New York Harbour, c.1920

USS Huntington (CL-107) at Naples, July-August 1948

I

Plans of Illinois Class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships

Bows of USS Iowa seen from the bridge

USS Indianapolis (CA-35), Mare Island, 12 July 1945

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) at New York, 1934

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) at Pearl Harbor

USS Ingraham (DD-111) at Union Iron Works, 1918

Commissioning Crew of USS Ingraham (DD-444), 14 June 1941

USS Ingraham (DD-444) underway, 1941-42

USS Isherwood (DD-284), Boston, 1919

USS Preston (DD-327), Isherwood (DD-284) and Coghlan (DD-326), Puget Sound

Depth charges and stern gun, USS Israel (DD-98)

Torpedo on USS Israel (DD-98)

Searchlight and signal equipment, USS Israel (DD-98)

AA gun and No.1 Gun, USS Israel (DD-98)

J

USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) sinking, 6 December 1917

Survivors from USS Jacob Jones (DD-61)

USS Yorktown (CV-5) and USS Jacob Jones (DD-130), 1937

USS Jacob Jones (DD-130) when new, c.1920

USS James K Paulding (DD-238) being launched

Japanese Prisoners on a US Carrier

USS Jarvis (DD-38) at Brest, 27 October 1918

USS Jarvis (DD-38) with damaged bow

USS Little (DD-79), USS Jarvis (DD-38) and USS Burrows (DD-29), Brest, 1918

USS Jarvis (DD-393) off San Diego, 1938

USS Jarvis (DD-393) off Puget Sound Navy Yard 1937

USS Jeffers (DMS-27) at sea, 23 July 1941

USS Patterson (DD-392) and USS Jarvis (DD-393) being launched, 1937

USS Jenkins (DD-42), 1919

USS Burrows (DD-29) and USS Jenkins (DD-42) dressed with flags, 1919

USS Jenkins (DD-42) dressed with flags, 1919

USS J Fred Talbott (AG-81), 1944

USS J Fred Talbott (DD-156), New York

USS John D Edwards (DD-216) transfering movies and laundry from USS Saratoga (CV-3)

USS John D Edwards (DD-216), March 1928

USS John D Ford (DD-228) in the 1920s

Crew of the USS John D Ford (DD-228) at Shanghai

Somers (DD-301), Farragut (DD-300), John Francis Burns (DD-299), Percival (DD-298) and Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Jouett (DD-41) in 1918

Crewman on bridge of USS Jouett (DD-396)

Sonar crew of USS Jouett (DD-396)

Aft Engine Room Controls of USS Jouett (DD-396)

USS Jouett (DD-396) passing President Roosevelt's flagship

USS Juneau (CL-52), New York, 11 February 1942

USS Juneau (CL-119) after launch, 15 July 1945

USS Toledo (CA-133) and USS Juneau (CLAA-119), Yokosuka, 1950

K

Task Group 77.12.7 seen from USS Kadashan (CVE-76)

USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) arriving at San Deigo for Repairs

Crewmen on USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) watching explosions on USS St Lo (CVE-63)

USS Kalk (DD-170) as HMS Hamilton

USS Kalk (DD-170), c.1919-22

USS Kalk (DD-611), Mare Island, 1942

USS Kane (DD-235) at Philadelphia

USS Kasaan (CVE-69) from the left

USS Kasaan Bay (CVE-69) seen from USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

Damage to ship's laundry, USS Kearny (DD-432)

Damage to officer's room, USS Kearny (DD-432)

Damage amidships, USS Kearny (DD-432)

Deck level view of the damage to USS Kearny (DD-432)

Damage to USS Kearny (DD-432) seen from tender

Damage to USS Kearny (DD-432) seen at Iceland

Crew on deck of USS Kearny (DD-432), Reykjavik

Crew using watertight doors, USS Kearny (DD-432)

Crew eating in mess, USS Kearny (DD-432)

Amidships section, USS Kearny (DD-432)

USS Kendrick (DD-612) at sea, 1943

USS Kennedy (DD-306) under way

USS Kennedy (DD-306) laying smoke

USS Kennison (DD-138) and USS Stansbury (DD-180)

USS Kennison (AG-83), San Diego, 1945

USS Kidder (DD-319) stripped for scrap

USS Kilty (DD-137) being launched, 1918

USS Kilty (DD-137), Empress Augusta Bay, 1943

Looking aft from bridge of USS Kimberly (DD-80), 1918

USS King (DD-242) from the right

Attack on Task Group 52.11 seen from USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71)

FM-2 Wildcats on USS Kitsun Bay (CVE-71), Samar

20mm AA gun on USS Kitsun Bay (CVE-71)

L

USS Laffey (DD-459) Fitting Out

Survivors from USS Wasp (CV-7) on USS Laffey (DD-459)

USS La Vallette (DD-315) during Presidential Review, 1927

USS Lamberton (DMS-2), 4 May 1945

Panoramic View of USS Lamson (DD-18)

USS Lamson (DD-18) at Sea, 1912

USS Lamson (DD-328) from Above

USS Lamson (DD-327) and USS Whitney (AD-4) in the Hudson River, 1927

USS Lamson (DD-367) and USS Haraden (DD-585) with battle damage

USS Lamson (DD-367) at Mare Island

USS Lang (DD-399) from above, 1943

USS Lang (DD-399) from the Stern, 1943

Navy TS-1 of VF-1, USS Langley (CV-1), 1923

Curtiss F6C-2 Hawk on USS Langley (CV-1) for trials, 1926-7

USS Langley (CV-1) and USS Somers (DD-301)

Boeing F3B-1 of VF-2B crashed on USS Langley (CV-1)

USS Lansdale (DD-101) in the Adriatic, 1919

USS Lansdale (DD-101) at Venice, 1919

USS Lansdale (DD-426), New York Navy Yard, 22 October 1943

Japanese representatives on USS Lansdown (DD-486)

USS Lardner (DD-286) at Toulon, 1927

USS Lardner (DD-487) as Turkish Gemlik , 1956-57

USS Lardner (DD-487), New York, 1942

USS Laub (DD-263) receiving mail, 1919

Conning Tower of USS Lawrence (DD-8)

Forward Superstructure of USS Lawrence (DD-8)

USS Lawrence (DD-8) at Sea

USS Hull, Lawrence, Hopkins, Whipple & Truxtun, 1907

USS Lawrence (DD-250) at Mare Island Navy Yard, 1942

USS Lawrence (DD-250) from Above

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Lea (DD-118)

USS Lea (DD-118) at San Diego, 1933

USS Lea (DD-118), Boston Navy Yard, 1943

First radar test, USS Leary (DD-158), 1937

USS Leary (DD-158), San Diego, 1930s

USS Leary (DD-158) and USS Shubrick (DD-268), New York, 1940

Curtiss F6C-3 taking off from USS Lexington (CV-2), April 1928

Commissioning Ceremony for USS Liscome Bay (CVE-56)

USS Litchfield (DD-336), 1934, Panama Canal Zone

USS Litchfield (DD-336) in Alaska, 1930s

Jonas H Ingram on the Bridge of USS Litchfield (DD-336)

USS Litchfield (DD-336) in Dry Dock

USS Litchfield (DD-336) at Smyrna

USS Little (DD-79), USS Jarvis (DD-38) and USS Burrows (DD-29), Brest, 1918

USS Little (DD-79) at Brest, 27 October 1918

Looking aft from Crow's Nest, USS Little (DD-79), 1918

Port Gun of USS Little (DD-79), 1918

Rear gun and depth charges, USS Little (DD-79), 25 October 1918

Forward Gun of USS Little (DD-79), 23 October 1918

USS Little (APD-4), early 1942

USS Little Rock (CL-92), Cape Cod Canal, c.1946-1949

USS Livermore (DD-429) in the Mid Atlantic, 1944

Guns and bridge of USS Livermore (DD-429), 1955

USS Livermore (DD-429) from the stern, 1955

USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Hovey (DD-208) and USS Long (DD-209), Panama Canal, 24 April 1931

USS Dixie (AD-14) and USS Long (DD-209), 1940

USS Long (DD-209) with the Asiatic Fleet, 1920s

USS Long (DD-209) in Alaskan waters, 1937

USS Long (DD-209) rolling in Alaskan waters

USS Long (DD-209) being towed out of storage, San Diego, 1929

USS Long (DD-209) and USS Wasmuth (DD-338) in Alaska, 1937

USS Long (DMS-12), Mare Island, 30 October 1943

USS Long Island (CVE-1) under construction

Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat on USS Long Island (CVE-1)

Curtiss SOC-3A Seagull on USS Long Island (CVE-1)

Brewster F2A Buffalo on USS Long Island (CVE-1)

USS Los Angeles (CA-135) bombarding Wonsan, 15 October 1951

USS Los Angeles (CA-135) signed by Admiral Arleigh Burke

General Quarter's Drill, USS Louisville (CA-28)

Interior of No.2 Turret, USS Louisville (CA-28)

Aerial View of USS Louisville (CA-28)

Open Bridge on USS Louisville (CA-28)

USS Louisville (CA-28), Mare Island, 7 April 1945

Flag Plot on USS Louisville (CA-28), 1943

USS Louisville (CA-28) at sea

Combat Infomation Centre on USS Louisville (CA-28), 1943

USS Louisville (CA-28) after refit

LST-33 and LST-35

USS Luce (DD-99) as a minelayer, c.1921

Forward gun of USS Luce (DD-99)

USS Ludlow (DD-112) as a minelayer, late 1920s

USS Ludlow (DD-112), 24 April 1926

USS Ludlow (DD-438) off Massachussets, 1945

M

USS MacDonough (DD-9), 1908

USS MacDonough (DD-331) at San Diego, 1920s

USS MacDonough (DD-331) making smoke

USS Macdonough (DD-351), Mare Island, 1942

USS Macdonough (DD-351) at Boston, 1935

USS MacKenzie (DD-614) from the air

USS MacLeish (DD-220) with the battlefleet, late 1930s

USS MacLeish (DD-220) at Constantinople, 1922

USS Macomb (DMS-23) at Sea, post-war

USS Macomb (DD-458), 13 October 1954

USS Macomb (DD-458) commissioning, Boston, 1942

USS Macon (CA-132), Philadelphia, 1946

USS Macon (CA-132) carrying Regulus Missiles, 1959

USS Macon (CA-132) firing a Regulus Missile, 1957

USS Maddox (DD-168), c.1920

USS Maddox (DD-622) from above, New York, 1942

USS Maddox (DD-622) from above-rear, New York, 1942

USS Maddox (DD-622) from above-front, 1942

USS Madison (DD-425) undergoing refit, New York, 1944

USS Mahan (DD-102) and USS Shawmut (CM-4) serving as seaplane tenders

USS Mahan (DD-102) as fast minelayer, c.1920-22

USS Mahan (DD-364) with rails manned

USS Mahan (DD-364) on trials, 1936

USS Mahan (DD-364) at Mare Island, 1944

Secondary conning station on USS Mahan (DD-364)

Plans of Maine Class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships

USS Manchester (CL-83) after bombarding Wonsan, 1953

USS Manchester (CL-83), 1950-52

Mitchells and Marauders on USS Manila Bay (CVE-61)

Officers and Crew of USS Manila Bay (CVE-61) on Flight Deck

73rd Fighter Squadron on USS Manila Bay (CVE-61)

USS Manley (DD-74) in First World War Camouflage

USS Manley (DD-74) as fast transport, 1939

USS Manley (DD-74) after collision, 1918

USS Marblehead (CL-12) side view

USS Marblehead (CL-12) Radar Installation, 1944

USS Marcus (DD-321) at high speed

USS Marcus (DD-321) being Launched

USS Marcus (DD-321) fitting out

Crew on USS Marcus Island (CVE-77) ducking

USS Marcus Island (CVE-77) in the South Pacific

Pearl Harbor: USS Maryland and capsized USS Oklahoma during the Pearl Harbor raid

USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Hovey (DD-208) and USS Long (DD-209), Panama Canal, 24 April 1931

USS Mason (DD-191) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 23 May 1921

USS Maury (DD-100) from above, 2 May 1927

Stern of USS Maury (DD-100)

USS Maury (DD-100) as a minelayer, 1921

USS Maury (DD-401) rescuing crashed airmen

USS Maury (DD-401) refueling from USS Guadalupe (AO-32)

USS Mayo (DD-422) east of Nova Scotia, 1942

USS Mayrant (DD-31) and USS Warrington (DD-30) fitting out, 1910

USS Mayrant (DD-402) from the right

USS Mayrant (DD-402) under fire, Casablanca

USS McCall (DD-28) refueling at sea, 1917

Commissioning Ceremony for USS McCall (DD-400)

USS McCall (DD-400) from the left

USS McCalla (DD-253) in the 1920s

Bow view of USS Mccalla (DD-488), Mare Island, 1944

Stern view of USS Mccalla (DD-488), Mare Island, 1944

Recruiting Poster based on USS McCawley (DD-276)

USS McCawley (DD-276), Boston, 1919

USS McCook (DD-252) in European Waters in 1919

USS McCook (DD-496) from above, 1945

USS McCormick (DD-223), c.1922-24

USS McCormick (DD-223) at New York, 14 January 1944

USS McDermut (DD-262) underway, c.1919-22

USS McDermut (DD-262) underway, 1924

USS McDougal (DD-54) at New York, 1921

USS McDougal (DD-54) with Franklin D. Roosevelt on board, 1914

USS McDougal (DD-358) from the left

USS McDougal (DD-358) being launched, 1936

HMS Prince of Wales and HMS McDougal (DD-358)

USS McFarland (DD-237) at Venice, 1922-23

USS McKean (APD-5), early 1942

USS McKee (DD-87), summer or autumn 1918

USS McLanahan (DD-264), New York, 1939-40

USS McLanahan (DD-615), Mare Island, 1943

USS Meade (DD-274) from the left

USS Meade (DD-602), San Francisco, 1944

USS Meade (DD-602) being built, 1942

USS Meade (DD-602) afloat after being launched

Frontal view of USS Meade (DD-602), San Francisco, 1944

USS Medusa (AR-1), 1934, Panama Canal Zone

USS Melville (AD-2), 1934, Panama Canal Zone

USS Melville (Destroyer Tender No.2), Queenstown, 1917

USS Sampson (DD-63) alongside USS Melville, 1918

USS Thompson (DD-305) and USS Melville (AD-2), Pearl Harbor, 1925

USS Melvin (DD-335) underway

Vought UO-1 being lowered from USS Memphis (CL-13)

USS Memphis (CL-13) in the South Atlantic, 1941-42

USS Meredith (DD-165), Boston Navy Yard, 4 February 1919

USS Meredith (DD-434) following USS North Carolina (BB-55)

USS Meredith (DD-434), Cuba, 1941

USS Mervine (DD-322) at rest

USS Meyer (DD-279) anchored

USS Mervine (DD-489), Atlantic, 9 May 1945

USS Miami (CL-89) departing for Okinawa, March 1945

Crew of USS Miami (CL-89) hoist in paravane, 26 March 1945

USS Milwaukee (CL-5), Tacoma, Washington, 1923

USS Milwaukee (CL-5) in early 1930s

USS Minneapolis (CA-36) with New Bow, 11 April 1943

USS Minneapolis (CA-36) with short bow, January 1943

USS Mission Bay (CVE-59) underway, August 1944

WAVES in Pilothouse of USS Mission Bay (CVE-59)

WAVES examine 20mm AA gun on USS Mission Bay (CVE-59)

Deckload of P-47s on USS Mission Bay (CVE-59)

Plans of Mississippi Class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships

USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, late 1945

USS Mobile (CL-63) preparing to launch a Vought OS2U Kingfisher, Marcus Raid

USS Moffett (DD-362) off South America

USS Moffet (DD-362) from above, 1945

USS Monaghan (DD-32) before the First World War

USS Monaghan at Mare Island, 1942

USS Monaghan (DD-354) and USS Dale (DD-353) emerge from smoke

USS Monssen (DD-436) passing mail to USS Enterprise (CV-6)

Amidships view of USS Monssen (DD-436)

Bridge structure of USS Monssen (DD-436)

Aft guns of USS Monssen (DD-436)

USS Montgomery (DM-17), c. 1930s

Radford (DD-120), Sproston (DD-173), Breese (DD-122), Badger (DD-126), Montgomery (DD-121)

USS Montpelier (CL-57), December 1942

USS Moody (DD-277) underway

USS Moody (DD-277) laying smoke screen

USS Moosehead (IX-98) in 1943

USS Morris (DD-416) at Charleston Navy Yard, 1942

Kamikaze Damage to USS Morris (DD-417)

USS Mugford (DD-105), 1920

USS Mugford (DD-389) at sea, 1939

USS Mugford (DD-389) with torpedo tubes out

Officers of USS Mugford (DD-389), 1939

USS Mugford (DD-389) from above, 1946

Radio Room on USS Mugford (DD-389) , 1946

USS Mullany (DD-325) passes the battle fleet

USS Mullany (DD-325) with a battle practice target

Entourage of Ibn Saud on USS Murphy (DD-603), 1945

USS Murray (DD-97) and USS Stribling (DD-96), fitting out 1918

Curtiss SBC-3 passes USS Mustin (DD-413)

N

USS Nashville (CL-43) at Mare Island, 1943

USS Nashville (CL-43) bombarding Kiska, 8 August 1943

Radar Mast on USS Nassau (CVE-16)

Flight Deck of USS Nassau (CVE-16)

P-47s buzz USS Natoma Bay (CVE-62)

USS Nehenta Bay (CVE-74), 1944

USS Nelson (DD-623) off Madagascar, November 1945

USS Nelson (DD-623) with stern damaged off Normandy, 1944

Spent shell cases on USS Nevada, D-Day

New Mexico class battleship bombardments Okinawa

New Orleans class cruiser firing

USS New Orleans (CA-32), 8 March 1945

Side view of USS New Orleans (CA-32)

USS Niblack (DD-424) on builder's trials, 1940

USS Nicholas (DD-311), San Francisco Bay 1923

USS Nicholas (DD-311) at Honda Point

USS Nicholas (DD-442) at sea, 1942

USS Nicholson (DD-52) on builder's trials, 1914

USS Nicholson (DD-52) under way, 1918

Commissioning Ceremeny for USS Nicholson (DD-442), 1941

USS Nields from the air,July 1945

USS Noa (DD-343) in 1921

USS Noa (DD-343) at Shanghai, 1927

Insigia of USS Noa (DD-343)

USS Northampton (CA-26), early 1930s

USS Northampton (CA-26) bombarding Wotje or Maloelap, 1 February 1942

O

USS Oklahoma City (CL-91) in the Delaware River, 9 April 1945

USS Oakland (CL-95), Mare Island, 27 October 1943

USS Oakland (CL-95), San Francisco, 2 August 1943

USS O'Bannon (DD-177) in harbour, 1920

USS O'Brien (DD-51) on trials, 1914

USS O'Brien (DD-415) under construction, 1938

USS O'Brien (DD-415) being torpedoed, 1942

Pearl Harbor: USS Maryland and capsized USS Oklahoma during the Pearl Harbor raid

USS Omaha (CL-4) aground in the Bahamas, 1937

Side view of USS Omaha (CL-4)

USS Ommaney Bay (CVE-79) about to enter Floating Dry Dock ABSD-2

Yokosuka P1Y Frances missing USS Ommaney Bay (CVE-79)

USS Ommaney Bay (CVE-79) on fire, 4 January 1945

USS Ordronaux (DD-617) at Boston, 1943

USS Ordronaux (DD-617) at sea 1945

USS Osborne (DD-295) at Boston, 1920

USS Osborne (DD-295), USS Gwin (DD-71) and USS DuPont (DD-152), Charleston, SC, 1920

USS Osmond Ingram (APD-35) at Charleston, 1944

USS Osmond Ingram (AVD-9) at Norfolk, 1943

USS Overton (APD-23) at Norfolk, 1943

Mrs Margaret Overton sponsors USS Overton (DD-239)

P

USS Palmer (DD-151) from the air, c.1919-21

USS Parker (DD-48), Hampton Roads, 1914

USS Parker (DD-604) seen from above off New York, 1945

Crashed Nakajima E8N1 alongside USS Parrott (DD-218), Shangai, 1937

USS Parrott (DD-218) at Manila, 1931

Combat Infomation Centre on USS Pasadena (CL-65), 21 November 1944

USS Pasadena (CL-65), Mare Island Naval Yard, 2 May 1946

USS Patterson (DD-36), Cape May, New Jersey

USS Patterson (DD-36) fitting out, 1911

USS Patterson (DD-392) at sea in 1939

USS Patterson (DD-392) refueling at sea, Lingayen Bay

USS Patterson (DD-392) and USS Jarvis (DD-393) being launched, 1937

USS Paul Hamilton (DD-307), early 1920s

USS Paulding (DD-22) at Queenstown, 1918

Torpedo Tubes on USS Paulding (DD-22)

Electrician's Mate Truman C. Emery (USS Paulding)

Paul Jones class destroyer engines

USS Paul Jones (DD-10) in Dazzle Camouflage, 1918

USS Paul Jones (DD-10), Guaymas Mexico, 1915

Thornycroft Water Tube Boiler, Paul Jones Class Destroyers

USS Hopkins (DD-6) and USS Paul Jones (DD-10), 1918

USS Paul Jones (DD-230) Fitting Out

USS Paul Jones (DD-230) from above, July 1943

USS Peary (DD-226) from the right

USS Peary (DD-226) on fire at Darwin, 19 February 1942

Plans of Pennsylvania Class Armoured Cruisers

USS Perry (DD-340) refueling from USS Pennsylvania (BB-38)

Pensacola Class Cruiser from Above

USS Pensacola (CA-24) at Mare Island, 29 June 1945

Side view of USS Pensacola (CA-24)

USS Pensacola (CA-24) after being rebuilt

USS Percival (DD-298) making a smokescreen

Somers (DD-301), Farragut (DD-300), John Francis Burns (DD-299), Percival (DD-298) and Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Perkins (DD-26) at anchor, 1918

USS Perkins (DD-377) underway

USS Perkins (DD-377) from above, 1938

USS Perry (DD-11) at Puget Sound Dry Dock

USS Perry (DD-11) at Sea, 1908

USS Perry (DD-340) refueling from USS Pennsylvania (BB-38)

Stern of USS Phelps (DD-360), Mare Island, 1942

Bow of USS Phelps (DD-360), Mare Island, 1942

USS Phelps (DD-360) off New York Navy Yard, 1945

Anti-aircraft guns on USS Phoenix (CL-46), Mindoro, 1944

Side view of USS Phoenix (CL-46), 1939

USS Philadelphia (CL-41) in Philadelphia Navy Yard, 7 October 1937

USS Philadelphia (CL-41) at New York

Crew of USS Philip (DD-76), 1930s

USS Pillsbury (DD-227) in 1930

Divers work on bow of USS Pittsburg (CA-72), June 1945

USS Pittsburg (CA-72), mid 1950s

USS Plunkett (DD-431), Rhode Island, 1945

USS Plunkett (DD-431) from above

USS Pompano (SS-181) and USS Henley (DD-391) under construction 1936

USS Pope (DD-225) at Algiers, 1922

USS Pope (DD-225) off Luzon, 1924

Landing Party from USS Pope (DD-225), Hankow, 1927

USS Porter (DD-59), Queenstown, 1918

USS Porter (DD-59) at Queenstown, 4 May 1917

Above-front view of USS Porter (DD-356) at Mare Island

Above view of USS Porter (DD-356) at Mare Island

Stern view of USS Porter (DD-356) at Mare Island

Bows view of USS Porter (DD-356) at Mare Island

Portland Class Cruiser from the Left

USS Portland (CA-33) at Mare Island, 7 February 1942

USS Portland (CA-33), Mare Island, 30 July 1944

USS Portland (CA-33) at sea, 23 August 1935

Bridge and Foremast of USS Portland (CA-33) during 1933 refit

USS Portland (CA-33) bombarding Leyte, October 1944

USS Warrington (DD-30), USS Walke (34), USS Porter (DD-59), Queenstown, 1918

USS Portsmouth (CL-102) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 22 July 1945

USS Preble (DD-12) off Guaymas, Mexico, 26 December 1915

Crew of USS Preble (DD-345)

USS Preble (DD-345) moving at speed

USS Preble (DD-345) flying homeward bound pennant

USS Preston (DD-19) on Builder's Trials, 1909

USS Preston (DD-19) at sea, 1912

USS Preston (DD-327) at Copenhagen, 1925

USS Preston (DD-327), Isherwood (DD-284) and Coghlan (DD-326), Puget Sound

USS Smith (DD-378) and USS Preston (DD-379) under construction

USS Cohglan (DD-326) and USS Preston (DD-327) at Trieste

USS Birmingham fighting fires on USS Princeton

USS Prince William (CVE-31) transporting aircraft

USS Providence (CL-82) at Livorno, 4 December 1948

USS Pruitt (DD-347) in Dry Dock

USS Pruitt (DD-347) in the Panama Canal

USS Putnam (DD-287) from the front

Q

USS Quick (DMS-32), c.1946

USS Quincy (CA-39) at New York, 29 May 1942

USS Quincy (CA-39) moored

USS Quincy (CA-71) bombarding Toulon, 16 August 1944

USS Quincy (CA-71) in the Pacific, 1952-54

R

USS Radford (DD-120), 1922

Radford (DD-120), Sproston (DD-173), Breese (DD-122), Badger (DD-126), Montgomery (DD-121)

Side view of USS Raleigh (CL-7), 1920s

USS Raleigh (CL-7) anchored

USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) being christened, 1936

USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) at New York, 1938

USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) off Mare Island , 1942

USS Blue (DD-387) and USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) , Mare Island Navy Yard, 1942

USS Ramsay (DD-124) making smoke

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Rathburne (DD-113)

USS Rathburne (DD-113), c.1920

USS Rathburne (APD-25), 1944

USS Reid (DD-21) in Louisiana Intercoastal Canal

USS Reid (DD-292) at Bordeaux, 1925

USS Reid (DD-292) at Boston, 1919

USS Reid (DD-292) in the Kiel Canal

USS Reid (DD-369) being launched

USS Reid (DD-369) in Dutch Harbor

USS Reno (DD-303) from above

USS Reno (DD-303) making smoke

USS Reno (DD-303) in Puget Sound, 1927

USS Reno (DD-303) preparing to be scrapped, 1931

USS Reno (CL-96) at sea, late 1943 or early 1944

USS Reno (CL-96) from the left

USS Renshaw (DD-176) with Des Div 22, c.1921-22

USS Reuben James (DD-245) in the Culebra Cut

USS Rhind (DD-404) near New York, 1944

Crew of USS Richmond (CL-9)

USS Richmond (CL-9) in Panama Canal, 1925

USS Ringgold (DD-89), 27 December 1918

USS Rizal (DD-174) with crew on foredeck, 10 January 1920

USS Robert Smith (DD-324) at sea

USS Robinson (DD-88) on trials, San Francisco, October 1918

USS Rodgers (DD-254) at Guantanamo Bay, 1920

USS Rodman (DD-456) newly commissioned, 27 January 1942

USS Hambleton (DD-455) and USS Rodman (DD-456) being launched, 1941

USS Roe (DD-24) laying smoke

USS Roe (DD-24) being launched, 24 July 1909

USS Roe (DD-24) before launch, 24 July 1909

USS Roe (DD-418) carrying survivors from SS Alan Jackson

USS Roe (DD-418) rescuing crew of B-29

USS Roper (DD-147) seen from above

Kamikaze damage on USS Roper (APD-20)

USS Rowan (DD-64) at Sea, November 1917

USS Rowan (DD-405) underway, 16 August 1940

USS Russell (DD-414), 1939-40

USS Russell (DD-414) and USS Sims (DD-409), Norfolk, 1941

S

USS S P Lee (DD-310) in drydock

USS S P Lee (DD-310) at Honda Point

USS Saint Louis (CL-49) bombarding Guam, 21 July 1944

USS Saint Louis (CL-49) at Tulagi, 1943

USS Saint Paul (CA-73) firing 5in/ 38 Guns, Wonsan, 1951

USS Saint Paul (CA-73), 26 March 1968

Radar on USS Salt Lake City (CA-25), 10 May 1943

Control Room on USS Salt Lake City (CA-25), 1937

Preliminary Design 107 for Sampson Class Destroyers, 21 January 1914

USS Sampson (DD-63) alongside USS Melville, 1918

USS Sampson (DD-63) in Hampton Roads, 13 December 1916

USS Sampson (DD-63) crossing the Atlantic, May 1917

USS Sampson (DD-394), late 1930s

USS Sampson (DD-394) from USS Saratoga (CV-3).

USS Sampson (DD-394), Gulf of Panama,1943

USS San Diego (CL-53) after her 1944 overhaul

USS Sands (DD-243) under Brooklyn Bridge

USS Sands (APD-13) in 1944

USS San Francisco (CA-38) at Mare Island, 19 May 1942

USS San Francisco (CA-38) underway, 8 April 1944

Damaged flight deck of USS Sangamon (CVE-26)

Damaged Hanger of USS Sangamon (CVE-26)

Colour picture of USS Sangamon (CVE-26)

USS Sangamon (CVE-26) in Chesapeake Bay

USS San Juan (CL-54) and USS San Diego (CL-53) under construction

USS San Juan (CL-54), San Francisco, 14 October 1944

USS Santa Fe (CL-60) in the Aleutians, April-August 1943

USS Santa Fe (CL-60) at sea, 5 March 1943

USS Santee (CVE-28) as an oiler

Crew of USS Santee (CVE-28) exercising on deck

SBDs and F4F-4s on USS Santee (CVE-28) during Operation Torch

USS Ellyson (DD-454) refueling from USS Santee (CVE-29), Operation Torch

USS Saratoga (ACR-2)

F2B-1, F3B-1 and T4M on USS Saratoga (CV-3)

Martin T4M on USS Saratoga (CV-3)

USS Galveston, USS Bainbridge and USS Saratoga, c.1914-16

USS Satterlee (DD-190) in Port, c.1920-22

USS Savannah (CL-42), 1938

Crew of USS Savannah (CL-42), 1938

USS Savo Island (CVE-78) from above, 24 May 1944

Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159)

USS Schenck (DD-159) moored

USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943

Aft 4in/50 gun, USS Schley (DD-103), Fiume 1919

Crew members of USS Schley (DD-103), 1919

USS Selfridge (DD-320) at Sea

USS Selfridge (DD-320) and USS S-25 (SS-313) at power-boat race

USS Selfridge (DD-357) from above, 1944

USS Selfridge (DD-357) during inclining experiment, 1944

USS Selfridge (DD-357) from the left

USS Semmes (DD-189) at Guantanamo Bay, c.1919-20

Officers and Crew of USS Sharkey (DD-281) at Boston

USS Sharkey (DD-281) at Gibraltar, 1927

USS Sharkey (DD-281) having a propeller removed

USS Shaw (DD-68) after collision with the Aquitania

USS Shaw (DD-68), before 1918 collision

USS Shaw (DD-373) on fire in floating dry dock YFD-2

Severed Bow of USS Shaw (DD-373)

USS Shaw (DD-373) on Trials

USS Clark (DD-361), USS Case (DD-370), Cummings (DD-365), Shaw (DD-373) and Tucker (DD-374) , San Diego 1941

USS Mahan (DD-102) and USS Shawmut (CM-4) serving as seaplane tenders

USS Leary (DD-158) and USS Shubrick (DD-268), New York, 1940

USS Sicard (DD-346) in Dry Dock

USS Sicard (DD-346) in Manila Bay

USS Sigourney (DD-81) at Boston Navy Yard, 9 February 1919

USS Simpson (DD-221) from the left

Measure 31, Camouflage Design 11D for Sims Class Destroyers, Port Side

Measure 31, Camouflage Design 11D for Sims Class Destroyers, Starboard Side

USS Sims (DD-409), Boston Navy Yard, 1940

USS Russell (DD-414) and USS Sims (DD-409), Norfolk, 1941

USS Sinclair (DD-275) with her rails manned

Engine Room Crew of USS Sinclair (DD-275)

USS Sloat (DD-316) against Mountains

USS Sloat (DD-316) at Sea

USS Smith (DD-17) at anchor, 1910

USS Smith (DD-378) refuels, 1942

USS Smith (DD-378) at Pearl Harbor, 1946

USS Smith (DD-378) and USS Preston (DD-379) under construction

USS Smith Thompson (DD-212) from the right

USS Smith Thompson (DD-212) at Constantinople, c.1920-21

USS Whipple (DD-217) and USS Smith Thompson (DD-212) at Dewey Dry Dock after 1936 Collision

USS Smith Thompson (DD-212) being scuttled, 25 July 1936

USS Solomons (CVE-67) at San Diego

USS Somers (DD-301) at Culebra Bay, 1920s

USS Langley (CV-1) and USS Somers (DD-301)

Somers (DD-301), Farragut (DD-300), John Francis Burns (DD-299), Percival (DD-298) and Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Somers (DD-381), Charleston Navy Yard, 1942

Plans of South Carolina Class Dreadnought Battleships

Side view of USS Southard (DD-207)

USS Southard (DD-207), Mare Island Navy Yard, 1943

USS Southard (DMS-10), Mare Island, 9 June 1942

USS Spokane (CL-120) being commissioned, 17 May 1946

USS Springfield (CL-66) off Boston, 6 January 1945

USS Sproston (DD-173), c. 1919-20

Radford (DD-120), Sproston (DD-173), Breese (DD-122), Badger (DD-126), Montgomery (DD-121)

USS St Lo (CVE-63) at San Diego Destroyer Base

Plans of St Louis Class armoured Cruisers

Forward view of USS Stack (DD-406)

USS Stack (DD-406), Mare Island, 1944

USS Stansbury (DD-180) in port, 1921

USS Kennison (DD-138) and USS Stansbury (DD-180)

USS Kennison (AG-83), San Diego, 1945

USS Sterett (DD-27) in rough sea off Ireland, 1918

Curtiss Model E 'AH-12' on USS Sterett (DD-27)

Kamikaze Damage to USS Sterett (DD-407)

USS Sterett (DD-407) being launched, 1938

USS Stevens (DD-86) in dazzle camouflage

Damage to USS Stewart (DD-13) after collision, April 1918

USS Stewart (DD-13) on Convoy Escort duty, St Nazaire to Brest, November 1918

USS Stewart (DD-224) after recovery from the Japanese

USS Stewart (DD-224) launching a torpedo

USS Stewart (DD-224) from the left

Twin 4in/ 50 guns on USS Stockton (DD-73)

View inside bridge of USS Stockton (DD-73)

Crew at fire quarters, USS Stockton (DD-73)

Port 4in/50 gun on USS Stockton (DD-73)

USS Stoddert (DD-302) from the left

Steel Funnel Covers on USS Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Stoddert (DD-302) and USS Dent (DD-116), c.1931

Somers (DD-301), Farragut (DD-300), John Francis Burns (DD-299), Percival (DD-298) and Stoddert (DD-302)

USS Murray (DD-97) and USS Stribling (DD-96), fitting out 1918

USS Stribling (DD-96) under construction, 1918

USS Stribling (DD-96) at Venice, 1919

USS Stringham (DD-83) at Boston Navy Yard, 11 February 1919

USS Stringham (APD-6) at sea in 1944, probably in Marianas

USS Sturtevant (DD-24) at Philadelphia, 1932

USS Sturtevant (DD-240) under construction

USS Sumner (DD-333) returning torpedoes to USS Lexington (CV-2)

USS Sumner (DD-333) refueling from the Cuyama (AO-3)

USS Sumner (DD-333) at Hawaii, late 1920s

Smoke from fire inside USS Suwannee (CVE-27), 25 October 1944

Catholic Mass to honor the dead of Leyte Gulf, USS Suwannee (CVE-27)

USS Swanson (DD-443) at New York, 1943

Chamorro visitors on USS Swanson, 1945

Side view of USS Swanson (DD-443), New York, 1943

USS Suwannee (CVE-27) and USS Brooklyn (CL-40) during Operation Torch

USS Swasey (DD-273) from the right

T

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Talbot (DD-114)

USS Talbot (APD-7) preparing to refuel from USS Chandeleur (AV-10)

USS Talbot (DD-114), c. 1919-21

Side view of USS Talbot (APD-7)

USS Tallahassee (CL-61) under construction, 1 July 1941

Laundry day on USS Tarbell (DD-142), 1919-1922

USS Tarbell (DD-142) at New York, 24 July 1943

USS Tattnall (DD-125) on Navy Day, 1932

USS Tattnall (APD-19), Charleston, 1943

USS Taylor (DD-94) having bow cleared, 1942

USS Taylor (DD-94) at rededication of Statue of Liberty 1936

Plans of Tennessee Class Armoured Cruisers

USS Terry (DD-25), 1918

USS Terry (DD-25) with crew lined up

USS Thatcher (DD-162) leads ships into harbour, c.1919-22

USS Walker (DD-163), USS Crosby (DD-164), USS Thatcher (DD-162), Cuyama, USS Gamble (DD-123)

USS Thomas (DD-182), c.1920

Torpedoes for USS Thompson (DD-305) and USS Farragut (DD-300)

USS Thompson (DD-305) being stripped for scrap

USS Thompson (DD-305) laying a smoke screen

USS Thompson (DD-305) and USS Melville (AD-2), Pearl Harbor, 1925

USS Thornton (DD-270) in inshore waters

USS Thornton (AVD-11) after 1945 collision

Collision Damage to USS Thornton (AVD-11)

USS Tillman (DD-135) at New York, c.1930s

USS Tingey (DD-272), Alaska, 1920s

USS Toledo (CA-133) and USS Juneau (CLAA-119), Yokosuka, 1950

USS Toledo (CA-133) from upper-left

USS Topeka (CL-67) in Manila Bay, July 1946

USS Topeka (CL-67) Commissioning at Boston Navy Yard, 23 December 1944

USS Toucey (DD-282) at Toulon, 1927

USS Toucey (DD-282) from the front

USS Tracy (DD-214) at Olongapo, Philippines, 1920s

USS Trenton (CL-11) in Gulf of Panama, 11 May 1943

Bow View of USS Trenton (CL-11)

USS Trevor (DD-339) following USS Zane (DD-337) and USS Borie (DD-215), Alaska 1937

Female Marines and WAVES on USS Tripoli, 1944

USS Tripoli (CVE-64) from Above, April 1944

USS Trippe (DD-33) leaving Queenstown, December 1918

USS Trippe (DD-33), Hudson River, October 1912

Iced Up USS Trippe (DD-403), 1942

USS Trippe (DD-403), Boston, 1943

USS Truxtun (DD-14)

USS Truxtun (DD-14) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 1907

USS Truxtun (DD-229), 1934, Panama Canal Zone

USS Truxton (DD-229) at Babloa, 1934

Stockless anchor of USS Truxton (DD-229)

USS Hull, Lawrence, Hopkins, Whipple & Truxtun, 1907

USS Tucker (DD-57), Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston

USS Tucker (DD-57) under construction, 1 January 1915

Colour tinted postcard of USS Tucker (DD-57), c.1916-18

USS Cassin (DD-43) and USS Tucker (DD-57), Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston

Launch Bottle for USS Tucker (DD-374)

USS Tucker (DD-374) at Completion, 1937

USS Tucker (DD-374) being towed

USS Clark (DD-361), USS Case (DD-370), Cummings (DD-365), Shaw (DD-373) and Tucker (DD-374) , San Diego 1941

Airing the bedding, USS Tucson (CL-98), 1945

Steward's Mate 2nd Class Miles Davis King on USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

Rear Admiral Calvin T. Durgin in the ready room, USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

British F6F Hellcat coming in to land on USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

F6F being waved off from USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

Operation Dragoon invasion fleet from USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

USS Kasaan Bay (CVE-69) seen from USS Tulagi (CVE-72)

USS Turner (DD-259) as the Water Barge YW-56

USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) off St. Johns, 1940

USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) in heavy seas, 1940

USS Twiggs (DD-127), 1930s

U

USS Upshur (DD-144), Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 1931-33

V

USS Vicksburg (CL-86) off US East Coast, 17 October 1944

USS Vincennes (CA-44), Hawaii, 8 July 1942

USS Vincennes (CL-64), 1945

Plans of Virginia Class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships

W

USS Wadsworth (DD-60) in rough seas

USS Wainwright (DD-62), New York, 20 May 1921

USS Wainwright (DD-62) on trials, 1915-16

USS Wainright (DD-419) on escort and training duties 1944

USS Wake Island (CVE-65) at Hampton Roads (1)

USS Wake Island (CVE-65) at Hampton Roads (2)

USS Walke (DD-18) firing 18in torpedo

Sailor on the bridge of USS Walke (DD-34)

USS Walke (DD-34) undergoing repairs, March 1914

USS Walke (DD-416) off Mare Island Navy Yard, 1942

Stern plan view of USS Walke (DD-416)

Bow plan view of USS Walke (DD-416)

USS Walker (DD-163), USS Crosby (DD-164), USS Thatcher (DD-162), Cuyama, USS Gamble (DD-123)

Troops embark on USS Ward (APD-16), 30 July 1944

USS Ward (DD-139) at Mare Island, September 1918

USS Ward (DD-139) firing No.3 Gun for first time

USS Warrington (DD-30), USS Walke (34), USS Porter (DD-59), Queenstown, 1918

USS Warrington (DD-30) at sea

USS Mayrant (DD-31) and USS Warrington (DD-30) fitting out, 1910

USS Warrington (DD-30), USS Walke (34), USS Porter (DD-59), Queenstown, 1918

USS Warrington (DD-383) in Perles Bay

USS Warrington (DD-383) from Blimp ZP12

USS Warrington (DD-383) underway in late 1930s

USS Warrington (DD-383) at New York Naval Review, 1939

USS Wasmuth (DD-338) in Alaska, 1937

USS Long (DD-209) and USS Wasmuth (DD-338) in Alaska, 1937

Crews of Rathburne, Talbot, Dent, Waters, Lea and Dorsey

Crew of USS Waters (DD-115)

USS Waters (APD-8) at Puget Sound, 1943

USS Welborn C Wood (DD-195), c.1921-22 or 1939-40

USS Welles (DD-257) dressed with flags

Pearl Harbor: Rescuing survivor near USS West Virginia

USS West Virginia (BB-48) from the right

USS West Virginia (BB-48) moving at speed

USS West Virginia (BB-48) after being rebuilt

Postcard of USS Whipple (DD-15)

Depth Bombs on USS Whipple (DD-15)

USS Whipple (DD-15) at Norfolk Navy Yard, 1907

6-pounder gun and crew, USS Whipple (DD-15)

USS Hull, Lawrence, Hopkins, Whipple & Truxtun, 1907

Bow of USS Whipple (DD-217) after collision with USS Smith Thompson (DD-212)

USS Whipple passing Levensau Bridge, Kiel Canal, 1927

Crew of USS Whipple (DD-217) on foredeck, c.1927-29

Survivors from USS Langley (CV-1) on USS Whipple (DD-217)

USS Whipple (DD-217) and USS Smith Thompson (DD-212) at Dewey Dry Dock after 1936 Collision

USS White Plains (CVE-66) at San Diego

Stinson OY-1 takes off from USS White Plains (CVE-66)

Mitsubishi Zero attacks USS White Plains (CVE-66)

USS Lamson (DD-327) and USS Whitney (AD-4) in the Hudson River, 1927

Preliminary Design for Wickes Class Destroyers

USS Wickes (DD-75) in Devonport Drydock, 1919

USS Wickes (DD-75) moored

USS Wilkes (DD-67) on trials, 30 September 1916

Depth Bomb Launchers on USS Wilkes (DD-67)

USS Wilkes (DD-441) in camo measure one, 1941.

USS Wilkes Barre (CL-103) at San Pedro, California, 31 January 1946

USS Wilkes Barre (CL-103) alongside Bunker Hill (CV-17)

USS Wilkes Barre (CL-103) fighting fires on Bunker Hill (CV-17)

Certificate of presence at Japanese surrender

USS William B Preston (DD-344) in 1920

USS William B Preston (DD-344) in 1927

Collision Damage on USS William Jones (DD-308)

USS Williams (DD-108) in the Mediterranean, 1919

USS Williamson (DD-244) and USS Hovey (DD-208), Panama Canal, 1930s

USS Williamson (DD-244) in the Culebra Cut, 1932

USS Williamson (DD-244), New York, 1920s

USS Wilson (DD-408) off Mare Island, 2 December 1942

USS Wilson (DD-408) from above

USS Winslow (DD-53) on trials, 1915

USS Winslow (DD-359) from the right

USS Winslow (DD-359) at Rio, December 1942

USS Wood (DD-317) aground on Angel Island

USS Woodbury (DD-309) aground off Honda Point

USS Fuller (DD-297) and USS Woodbury (DD-309) at Honda Point

USS Woodworth (DD-460) at Mare Island, 1944

Stern of USS Woodworth (DD-460) at Mare Island, 1944

USS Woolsey (DD-77) sinking, 26 February 1921

USS Woolsey (DD-77) at Brest, 29 June 1919

USS Woolsey (DD-77) being launched, 17 September 1918

USS Woolsey (DD-436) on builder's trials

USS Woolsey (DD-437) being launched, 1941

Crew of USS Worden (DD-16)

USS Worden (DD-288) at Boston, 1930

USS Worden (DD-352), anchored late 1930s

USS Worden (DD-352) run aground, 1942

X

Y

USS Yarborough (DD-314) after decommissioned

USS Yarborough (DD-314) at sea

USS Yarnall (DD-143) at sea, 1919-22

Midway: USS Yorktown being abandoned, 4 June 1942

Midway: On board USS Yorktown after she was hit by dive bombers

USS Yorktown (CV-5) and USS Jacob Jones (DD-130), 1937

Z

USS Zane (DD-337), 1934, Panama Canal Zone

USS Zane (DD-337) off an unnamed coast

Keel Laying Ceremony for USS Zane (DD-337)

USS Trevor (DD-339) following USS Zane (DD-337) and USS Borie (DD-215), Alaska 1937

USS Zeilin (DD-313) at San Diego

USS Zeilin (DD-313) in heavy seas

USS Gilmer (APD-11) and USS Zellars (DD-777) at Okinawa, 30 March 1945


The United States&apos fighting ships, from smallest to largest

If it floats, takes on enemies and is owned by the U.S. taxpayer, it&aposs on this list.


Donating Historic Items

From time to time, the Naval Historical Foundation facilitates the donation of historically significant naval items to repositories around the country. This includes photographs, uniforms, books, paperwork, and other physical artifacts. While the Foundation does not currently acquire new items for our own collection, we often play a part in ensuring the safe transfer of artifacts from private collections to proper archival institutions.

We are often asked what the best place is to donate and item. This is not an easy question, as it depends on the type of item, the period it is from, and the current holdings of archives and museums around the country. In general, unlabeled photographs, ships plaques, and ball caps are not desired by most collections. While each item will need to be assessed for condition, historical importance, and uniqueness, we thought it would be helpful to share this basic list of contacts that you might want to investigate if you you are thinking of making a donation.

Naval History and Heritage Command

The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) is the U.S. Navy’s official history command, with headquarters in Washington, D.C., and museums located around the United States. NHHC’s facilities at the Washington Navy Yard house millions of paper documents and photographs, as well as the Navy Department Library which has a collection of thousands of rare and interesting books on naval history. NHHC also maintains a large material collection of artifacts including uniforms, weapons, and ship artifacts.

NHHC accepts donations from the public. If you have artifacts that are considering for donation to the U.S. Navy, please use the following contacts:

Photographs: Photo Archives, (202) 433-2765

Art: Navy Art Collection, (202) 433-3815

Books: Navy Department Library, (202) 433-4132

Physical Artifacts: Curator Branch, (202) 433-7873

Paper Documents: Operational Archives, (202) 433-3224

World War II Materials

The National Museum of the Pacific War is located in Fredericksburg, Texas, the boyhood home of Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz. They collect items related to the Pacific campaign of World War II. Information on donating artifacts can be found here.

The National World War II Museum In New Orleans tells the story of the American experience during the war. Information on how to donate artifacts to the museum can be found here.

Vietnam Era Materials

The Vietnam Center and Archive at Texas Tech University has millions of pages of documents, photographs, and artifacts related to the Vietnam War. The accept donations from the public, information can be found here.

National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the official record keeping organization of the United States government. While the majority of their holdings come directly from the government itself, they do acquire selected relevant and important documentation and photography from private donors. They have pamphlets on their website regarding donation of photographs (here) and motion pictures (here). In general, NARA will not have an interest in acquiring materials from private donations, unless they are closely related to Federal records already in their custody. You can reach the NARA at 1-866-272-6272.

Library of Congress

The Foundation has a long standing relationship with the Library of Congress (LOC). The LOC is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The LOC does accept selected important items for donation, and provides instructions here on their website. Additionally, LOC runs the Veterans History Project which collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. If you have a firsthand account from a veteran, this is the place to go.

Other Navy and Military History Museums and Archives

There are many museums around the country which celebrate our Navy’s history, and which might be interested in a donation of your historic material. You may want to contact a museum or museum ship in your local area. If the items in question are from your service, or from the service of a family member, a local museum might be interested. You can find a full list of museums ships at the Historic Naval Ships Association website, complete with contact information for each of them. Additionally, you may want to try contacting the local NHHC museum in your area, a full list of which can be found here. Additionally, your local college or university may have a Special Collections department in their Library, which may be interested in items with a local connection.

Please note: The Naval Historical Foundation does not have the capability to appraise the value of donated items.


Picture Gallery - Ships of the United States Navy - History

THE UNITED STATES NAVY: ITS RISE TO GLOBAL PARITY 1900-1922

My thanks again to Graham Watson, retired from the History Department of Cardiff University, for this valuable contribution to the United States Navy in World War 1.

Gordon Smith, Naval-History.Net

- Rise to Global Parity, 1900-1922 ( here )


Organisation and Technology

- Royal Navy Log Books of the World War 1-era, includes references to USN ships escorting North Atlantic convoys, river gunboat operations in China etc

The United States Navy was one of three navies which emerged as major players on the oceans of the world in the early years of the twentieth century. Like the navies of Germany and Japan it developed from a largely coast-defence force to challenge the three dominant navies of the nineteenth-century - Great Britain, France and Russia.

This process began with the victory of the United States in the Spanish-American War of 1898 which brought new maritime responsibilities in the Caribbean and Far East. The need to secure the sea route to the soon to be constructed Panama Canal, and the acquisition of the Philippines in an increasingly unstable western Pacific were the most obvious impulses for the creation of a larger navy. The enthusiasm for naval might which characterised most powers in this period was enhanced by the unexpected elevation of one of the disciples of Arthur Mahan to the post of Commander-in-Chief of the United States Navy: President Theodore Roosevelt. Awareness of American economic and industrial might played a significant part in rise of the United States at the beginning of the twentieth-century.

A number of comparisons can be made between American naval developments and those which occurred in the other navies of this period.

1. With its new international responsibilities, there was more justification and understanding of the emergence of the United States Navy. Although not welcomed with open arms, there does not appear to have been the concern and worry which the emergence of the Imperial German Navy created.

2. Unlike the French, American policy makers and leaders quickly abandoned previous concepts of a coastal defence navy, and concentrated on the creation of a battle fleet.

3. Like the French the battle fleet lacked balance. The construction of the fleet produced a substantial force of battleships without a supporting force of cruisers. The Americans followed the French example in the construction of large armoured cruisers which were too slow for fleet work, and too large and expensive for trade protection duties. They did produce an adequate force of sea-going destroyers - like the British - to provide a substantial torpedo striking force

4. The political and professional structure needed to develop and command a large naval force was as weak and diffuse as that of Germany but worked better in practice because of a more consistent focus compared with that of the German Kaiser.

5. The tactical structures of a battle fleet evolved like those of Great Britain with the gradual introduction of fleets, squadrons and flotillas. This process was speeded up in 1915 and 1916 as the Americans absorbed lessons from the war: this included a small naval staff to give focus and leadership along British lines.

6. Surprisingly, in view of its new acquisitions, the American followed the British example, and created a geographically concentrated battle fleet. This was the Atlantic Fleet. A substantial force was not formed in the Pacific until 1919.

The final step to parity was the enormous naval strength which the United States Navy had by 1919-1920 the result of both the ship-building programmes from 1916 onwards, and the elimination or weakening of rivals whose participation in the Great War was longer and more catastrophic.




President Woodrow Wilson Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D Roosevelt in 1913, aged 31*

* In World War 2, British First Sea Lord and then Prime Minister Winston Churchill addressed President Roosevelt as "Former Naval Person" because of the latter's World War 1 post. Churchill himself was first appointed First Sea Lord in 1911 at age 37 until resigning in 1915.

The Commander-in-Chief of the United States Navy was the President, and during this period was:

6th March 1897-
14th September 1901-
6th March 1909-
6th March 1913-
6th March 1921-
William B McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt
William Howard Taft
Woodrow Wilson
Warren G Harding

Routine administration was devolved to the Secretary of the Navy:

6th March 1897-
1st May 1902-
1st July 1904-
1st July 1905-
5th December 1907-
1st December 1908-
6th March 1909-
6th March 1913-
6th March 1921-
John D Long
William H. Moody
Paul Morton
Charles Bonaparte
Victor Metcalf
Truman Newberry
George Meyer
Josephus Daniels
Edwin Denby

Amongst the Assistant Secretaries of the Navy were the related Roosevelts:

19th April 1897-10th May 1898-
17th March 1913-26th August 1920-
10th March 1921-30th September 1924-
Theodore Roosevelt
Franklin D Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt Jr.

The heads of each could be a civilian or a naval officer, all of whom were considered as Rear Admirals who were 'additional in grade' and outside the restrictions of age, time in office etc, which applied to flag officers.

Two further developments took place in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War:

(1) The General Board was created on 14th September 1901 as a forum which could tender advice to the Secretary of the Navy on all matters pertaining to the development of the service. Composed largely of senior flag officers on the verge of retirement, it was chaired by Admiral Dewey until 1917. He was succeeded by Rear Admiral Albert Winterhalter who had been CinC Asiatic Fleet.

(2) On 7th May 1903, the coastline of the United States was divided into a series of Naval Districts. Initially responsible for coast defences, they assumed a wider range of responsibilities from 1911. Most naval district commanders of this period were junior flag officers or captains. Some remained paper organisations, without staff, until 1915. None can be equated with the Royal Navy's Home Commands, the French Maritime Prefectures, or the German Baltic and North Sea Naval Stations.

1st Naval District
2nd Naval District
3rd Naval District
4th Naval District
5th Naval District
6th Naval District
7th Naval District
8th Naval District
9th-11th Naval Districts
12th Naval District
13th Naval District
14th Naval District
15th Naval District
Boston
Newport RI
New York
Philadelphia
Norfolk
Charleston
Miami
New Orleans
Great Lakes
San Francisco
Seattle
Hawaii - formed 1916
Panama CZ - August 1917

Until 11th May 1915, there was no equivalent to the Chief of the Naval Staff in the United States Navy. There was a flag officer described as Aide for Operations to the General Board. The post of Chief of Naval Operations was created as a result of knowledge of the role of similar positions in London, Paris and Berlin.

The status of the post was enhanced when the first occupant, Rear Admiral William Benson [who was the most junior flag officer] was given the acting rank of Admiral for the duration of his term of office [4 years]. He was succeeded by Admiral Robert Coontz on 1st November 1919. Throughout his term of office, his staff consisted of one captain and one clerk.

3. FLAG OFFICERS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY.






Admiral William Benson, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Henry Mayo, Atlantic Fleet Admiral William Caperton, Pacific Fleet Admiral Albert Winterhalter, Asiatic Fleet until 1917

The four posts designated for rank of admiral

The only substantive rank of flag officer was that of Rear Admiral . The singular exception to this was Admiral of the Navy George Dewey who had been given a special life-time rank as a reward for his victory at Manila Bay in 1898. From 1915, a small number of flag officers were given the acting rank of either Vice Admiral or Admiral while holding certain designated appointments . They reverted to Rear Admiral when relinquishing those appointments.

Four posts were designated for the rank of Admiral :

One post was designated as a Vice Admiral's appointment:

From 1917 the new post of Commander US Naval Forces Europe was designated as a Vice Admiral and then upgraded to Admiral in December 1918.

At the same time, the Commander Cruiser Force, Atlantic Fleet and the Commander US Naval Forces France became Vice Admirals.

This system of a single substantive rank, and a few temporary promotions, prevailed until the end of World War Two. The same system applied in the United States Army. It was the result of congressional determination to prevent the emergence of an officer class with possible political aspirations. This had been the response to misgivings over the role of President George Washington and Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton in the 1790's.

A further method of asserting civilian control was legislation which determined the age limits, length of sea service, and description of the posts to be held by flag officers. All appointments were subject to approval by the United States Senate. A major consequence of this legislation was the relatively brief spell in office of an individual flag officer, most of whom did not hold more than the one appointment.

As a result the United States Navy had a relatively faster turnover of flag officers than its European counterparts. When expansion occurred in 1917, the Navy Department had to resort to a series of temporary appointments for the duration of the conflict.

The following table shows the numbers of flag officers available for service between 1914 and 1919. Four categories of flag officer are listed - substantive rank additional in grade - these are the bureau chiefs temporary and temporary additional in grade.

Date Substantive Temporary Additional in Grade Temp. Additional
1.1.14
25 0 7 0
1.1.15 26
0
8
0
1.1.16
24 0
6*
0
1.1.17
30 0
9
0
1.1.18
24 10
9
4
1.1.19
25
30
14
2

* plus possibly 3 administrative posts filled by civilians

[all Rear Admirals except *** Vice Admiral and ****Admiral]





Admiral William Sims*
US Naval Forces Europe
Admiral Henry B Wilson**
US Naval Forces France
Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman, 6BS, Grand Fleet (US Atlantic Fleet) Rear Admiral Joseph Strauss , Mine Force (US Atlantic Fleet)

Commanders Active in European Waters

Aide of Operations, General Board
11.2.1913-Bradley Fiske

Bureau or Equivalent Chiefs
(it is not known when the "Bu" abbreviations were introduced or which of them are relevant to this list)

Yards & Docks (BuDocks)
see Bureau of Docks & Yards, 1917-1918
Howard Stanford
.16-Fred Harris
.17-Charles Parks
Navigation (BuNav) Victor Blue
.16-Leigh Palmer
.18-Victor Blue
Bureau Ordnance (BuOrd) Joseph Strauss
.16-Ralph Earle
Construction & Repair (BuCon) Richard Watt
.14-David Taylor
Steam Engineering (BuEng from 1920) Robert Griffin
Supplies & Accounts (BuSandS) Samuel McGowan
Medicine & Surgery (BuMed) Charles Stoke
.14-William Braisted
Judge Advocate General (JAG) Ridley Maclean
.17-William Watts
.18-George Clark
Commandant USMC [created 1918]
George Barnett


Non-commissioned [ edit | edit source ]

Ship Name Hull No. Class Type Comment
1st Lt. Baldomero Lopez USNS 1st Lt. Baldomero Lopez T-AK-3010 T-AK-3010 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo Maritime Prepositioning ship 𖑴]
1st Lt. Harry L. Martin USNS 1st Lt. Harry L. Martin T-AK-3015 T-AK-3015 1st Lt. Harry L. Martin Cargo ship 𖑵]
1st Lt. Jack Lummus USNS 1st Lt. Jack Lummus T-AK-3011 T-AK-3011 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo Maritime Prepositioning ship 𖑶]
2nd Lt. John P. Bobo USNS 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo T-AK-3008 T-AK-3008 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo Maritime Prepositioning ship 𖑷]
Able USNS Able T-AGOS-0020 T-AGOS-20 Victorious Ocean surveillance ship 𖑸]
Alan Shepard USNS Alan Shepard T-AKE-0003 T-AKE-3 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖑹]
Amelia Earhart USNS Amelia Earhart T-AKE-0006 T-AKE-6 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖑺]
Apache USNS Apache T-ATF-0172 T-ATF-172 Powhatan Fleet ocean tug 𖑻]
Arctic USNS Arctic T-AOE-0008 T-AOE-8 Supply Fast combat support 𖑼]
Benavidez USNS Benavidez T-AKR-0306 T-AKR-306 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖑽]
Big Horn USNS Big Horn T-AO-0198 T-AO-198 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖑾]
Bob Hope USNS Bob Hope T-AKR-0300 T-AKR-300 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖑿]
Bowditch USNS Bowditch T-AGS-0062 T-AGS-62 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖒀]
Bridge USNS Bridge T-AOE-0010 T-AOE-10 Supply Fast combat support 𖒁]
Brittin USNS Brittin T-AKR-0305 T-AKR-305 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖒂]
Bruce C. Heezen USNS Bruce C. Heezen T-AGS-0064 T-AGS-64 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖒃]
Carl Brashear USNS Carl Brashear T-AKE-0007 T-AKE-7 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒄]
Catawba USNS Catawba T-ATF-0168 T-ATF-168 Powhatan Fleet ocean tug 𖒅]
Cesar Chavez USNS Cesar Chavez T-AKE-0014 T-AKE-14 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒆]
Charles Drew USNS Charles Drew T-AKE-0010 T-AKE-10 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒇]
Charlton USNS Charlton T-AKR-0314 T-AKR-314 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖒈]
Choctaw County USNS Choctaw County JHSV-0002 JHSV-2 Spearhead Joint high speed vessel 𖒉] 𖒊]
Comfort USNS Comfort T-AH-0020 T-AH-20 Mercy Hospital ship 𖒋]
Dahl USNS Dahl T-AKR-0312 T-AKR-312 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖒌]
Effective USNS Effective T-AGOS-0021 T-AGOS-21 Victorious Ocean surveillance ship 𖒍]
Fisher USNS Fisher T-AKR-0301 T-AKR-301 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖒎]
Flint USNS Flint T-AE-0032 T-AE-32 Kilauea Ammunition ship 𖒏]
Grapple USNS Grapple T-ARS-0053 T-ARS-53 Safeguard Salvage ship 𖒐]
Grasp USNS Grasp T-ARS-0051 T-ARS-51 Safeguard Salvage ship 𖒑]
Gilliland USNS Gilliland T-AKR-0298 T-AKR-298 Gordon Vehicle cargo ship 𖒒]
Gordon USNS Gordon T-AKR-0296 T-AKR-296 Gordon Vehicle cargo ship 𖒓]
Guadalupe USNS Guadalupe T-AO-0200 T-AO-200 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒔]
Guam USNS Guam HST-0001 HST-1 Guam High speed transport 𖒕]
GYSGT Fred W. Stockham USNS GYSGT Fred W. Stockham T-AK-3017 T-AK-3017 GYSGT Fred W. Stockham Cargo ship 𖒖]
Henry J. Kaiser USNS Henry J. Kaiser T-AO-0187 T-AO-187 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒗]
Henson USNS Henson T-AGS-0063 T-AGS-63 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖒘]
Howard O. Lorenzen USNS Howard O. Lorenzen T-AGM-0025 T-AGM-25 Instrumentation Ship 𖒙]
Impeccable USNS Impeccable T-AGOS-0023 T-AGOS-23 Impeccable Ocean surveillance ship 𖒚]
John Ericsson USNS John Ericsson T-AO-0194 T-AO-194 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒛]
John Lenthall USNS John Lenthall T-AO-0189 T-AO-189 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒜]
Joshua Humphreys USNS Joshua Humphreys T-AO-0188 T-AO-188 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒝]
Kanawha USNS Kanawha T-AO-0196 T-AO-196 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒞]
Lance Cpl. Roy M. Wheat USNS Lance Cpl. Roy M. Wheat T-AK-3016 T-AK-3016 Lance Cpl. Roy M. Wheat Cargo ship 𖒟]
Laramie USNS Laramie T-AO-0203 T-AO-203 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒠]
Lawrence H. Gianella USNS Lawrence H. Gianella T-AOT-1125 Gus W. Darnell Fuel Tanker 𖒡]
Leroy Grumman USNS Leroy Grumman T-AO-0195 T-AO-195 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒢]
Lewis and Clark USNS Lewis and Clark T-AKE-0001 T-AKE-1 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒣]
Loyal USNS Loyal T-AGOS-0022 T-AGOS-22 Victorious Ocean surveillance ship 𖒤]
Maj. Stephen W. Pless USNS Maj. Stephen W. Pless T-AK-3007 T-AK-3007 Sgt. Matej Kocak Cargo ship 𖒥]
Mary Sears USNS Mary Sears T-AGS-0065 T-AGS-65 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖒦]
Matthew Perry USNS Matthew Perry T-AKE-0009 T-AKE-9 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒧]
Medgar Evers USNS Medgar Evers T-AKE-0013 T-AKE-13 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒨]
Mendonca USNS Mendonca T-AKR-0303 T-AKR-303 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖒩]
Mercy USNS Mercy T-AH-0019 T-AH-19 Mercy Hospital ship 𖒪]
Montford Point USNS Montford Point T-MLP-0001 T-MLP-1 Montford Point Mobile Landing Platform 𖒫] 𖒬]
Navajo USNS Navajo T-ATF-0169 T-ATF-169 Powhatan Fleet ocean tug 𖒭]
Observation Island USNS Observation Island T-AGM-0023 T-AGM-23 Instrumentation Ship 𖒮]
Pathfinder USNS Pathfinder T-AGS-0060 T-AGS-60 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖒯]
Patuxent USNS Patuxent T-AO-0201 T-AO-201 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒰]
Pecos USNS Pecos T-AO-0197 T-AO-197 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒱]
PFC Dewayne T. Williams USNS PFC Dewayne T. Williams T-AK-3009 T-AK-3009 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo Cargo ship 𖒲]
PFC Eugene A. Obregon USNS PFC Eugene A. Obregon T-AK-3006 T-AK-3006 Sgt. Matej Kocak Maritime Prepositioning ship 𖒳]
Pililaau USNS Pililaau T-AKR-0304 T-AKR-304 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖒴]
Pomeroy USNS Pomeroy T-AKR-0316 T-AKR-316 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖒵]
Rainier USNS Rainier T-AOE-0007 T-AOE-7 Supply Fast combat support 𖒶]
Rappahannock USNS Rappahannock T-AO-0204 T-AO-204 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖒷]
Red Cloud USNS Red Cloud T-AKR-0313 T-AKR-313 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖒸]
Richard E. Byrd USNS Richard E. Byrd T-AKE-0004 T-AKE-4 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒹]
Robert E. Peary USNS Robert E. Peary T-AKE-0005 T-AKE-5 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒺]
Sacagawea USNS Sacagawea T-AKE-0002 T-AKE-2 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖒻]
Safeguard USNS Safeguard T-ARS-0050 T-ARS-50 Safeguard Salvage ship 𖒼]
Salvor USNS Salvor T-ARS-0052 T-ARS-52 Safeguard Salvage ship 𖒽]
Seay USNS Seay T-AKR-0302 T-AKR-302 Bob Hope Vehicle cargo ship 𖒾]
Shughart USNS Shughart T-AKR-0295 T-AKR-295 Shughart Vehicle cargo ship 𖒿]
Sioux USNS Sioux T-ATF-0171 T-ATF-171 Powhatan Fleet ocean tug 𖓀]
Sisler USNS Sisler T-AKR-0311 T-AKR-311 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖓁]
Soderman USNS Soderman T-AKR-0317 T-AKR-317 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖓂]
Spearhead USNS Spearhead JHSV-0001 JHSV-1 Spearhead Joint high speed vessel 𖓃]
Sumner USNS Sumner T-AGS-0061 T-AGS-61 Pathfinder Survey ship 𖓄]
Supply USNS Supply T-AOE-0006 T-AOE-6 Supply Fast combat support 𖓅]
Tippecanoe USNS Tippecanoe T-AO-0199 T-AO-199 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖓆]
Victorious USNS Victorious T-AGOS-0019 T-AGOS-19 Victorious Ocean surveillance ship 𖓇]
Wally Schirra USNS Wally Schirra T-AKE-0008 T-AKE-8 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖓈]
Walter S. Diehl USNS Walter S. Diehl T-AO-0193 T-AO-193 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖓉]
Washington Chambers USNS Washington Chambers T-AKE-0011 T-AKE-11 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖓊]
Waters USNS Waters T-AGS-0045 T-AGS-45 Survey ship 𖓋]
Watkins USNS Watkins T-AKR-0315 T-AKR-315 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖓌]
Watson USNS Watson T-AKR-0310 T-AKR-310 Watson Vehicle cargo ship 𖓍]
William McLean USNS William McLean T-AKE-0012 T-AKE-12 Lewis and Clark Dry cargo ship 𖓎]
Yano USNS Yano T-AKR-0297 T-AKR-297 Shughart Vehicle cargo ship 𖓏]
Yukon USNS Yukon T-AO-0202 T-AO-202 Henry J. Kaiser Replenishment oiler 𖓐]
Zeus USNS Zeus T-ARC-0007 T-ARC-7 Cable repair ship 𖓑]

Length: 176 feet (between perpendiculars)
Beam: 40 feet, 6 inches (molded beam)
Draft: 21 feet
Displacement: 1,400 tons
Armament (1862): Gun Deck (Main battery): Sixteen 8 in. chambered shell guns, four 32-pdr. long guns Spar Deck (Pivot guns): one 30-pdr. Parrott rifle at the bow and one 20-pdr. Parrott rifle at the stern three 12-pdr. boat howitzers

Address:
Historic Ships in Baltimore
Pier 1, 301 East Pratt Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21202-3134
(410) 539-1797
Fax: (410) 539-6238
Email: [email protected]://www.historicships.org
http://www.historicships.org/
Latitude: 39.2855430736, Longitude: -76.611167583
Google Maps, Microsoft Bing, Yahoo Maps, Mapquest

Constellation bears the same name as the famous frigate launched in 1797, which was broken up at the same time the sloop-of-war was being built. Before the Civil War, Constellation served as Flag Ship of the U.S. Africa Squadron patrolling the waters off of West Africa in search of ships carrying human cargo. She captured three slavers including the barque Cora and freed 705 Africans destined for slavery. At the outbreak of the Civil War, she made the first Union Navy capture at sea, overpowering Triton, a slaver brig sailing in coastal waters off Africa. She then spent two years on the Mediterranean station protecting American shipping from Confederate commerce raiders. In 1864, Constellation reported for duty with Farragut’s West Gulf Blockading Squadron.

After the Union was restored, the sloop-of-war saw service as a practice ship for midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy, earning the nickname “Cradle of Admirals” as so many future high ranking naval officers trained aboard her during annual summer cruises. During this period the ship’s special duties included carrying precious American works of art to the Paris Exposition in 1878 and carrying famine relief stores to Ireland in 1880. From 1894 to 1933, Constellation served as a stationary training ship at the United States Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island. During World War II, she served as relief flagship for the Admiral of the Atlantic Fleet.


See also [ edit | edit source ]

Primary [ edit | edit source ]

Secondary [ edit | edit source ]

United States Navy  • Category: United States Navy

United States Navy Archive Sections

Our library of books by or about the United States Navy includes pictorials, training manuals, topical subject matter books, history, ships, and submarines, published from the early 1900s through current releases.

Topics covered include Aviation, Navy Careers, Naval Facilities, Naval Reserves, Navy Women, Recruits and Training, Ships and Submarines, Special Programs, US Naval Training Centers, War Time, and WAVES / SPARS.

The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives has several Cruise Books from deployments of Aircraft Carriers of the U.S. Navy, including the Coral Sea (CVA-43), Enterprise (CVN-65), Nimitz (CVN-68), Ranger (CVA-61), Saratoga (CVA-60), and the Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71).

For reasons of security, the deed for which a man receives a decoration often cannot be adequately described either in this section or in the actual citation, which he accepts. There may accordingly be reports here that do not tell the whole story.

Magazines in our Navy Collection include All Hands Magazine Approach: Naval Aviation Safety Review Magazine Naval Aviation News Naval History Magazine Naval Institute Proceedings Magazine Our Navy The Hook: Journal of Carrier Aviation and Others.

Some of the newsletters in our collection include the Norfolk Seabag (US Naval Training Center), The Naval Reservist, and the WAVES News Letter.

Recruit boot camp graduation books for the United States Naval Training Centers at Bainbridge, Maryland (The Compass) Great Lakes (The Keel) Orlando, Florida (The Rudder) and San Diego, California (The Anchor).


Spectacular photos of the US Navy's most powerful battleship ever

This is the USS Iowa, the first of the largest, most powerful battleship class ever in the United States Navy, equipped with nine 16-inch (406mm) guns that could fire nuclear shells—the only American ship in history with this capability. This photo series is old but still stunning.

Those nine guns firing simultaneously is a terrible but awesome sight. In a real battle situation, however, it wasn't the optimal way to attack. The shells' shockwaves were so powerful that they affected each other, making their trajectories too imprecise. They solved this problem by firing the guns in rapid succession—all the individual guns were capable of firing independently.

It may seem really simple, but it isn't. This fascinating old film shows how the guns—and the more than 70 men that operated each of the turrets—worked:

The death of the battleship

The Iowa's were used in the Pacific during World War II, but soon everyone realized that the battleship days—when they were the heart of the fleet and its most powerful component—were over. The aircraft carrier, its fighter and bombers, became the most powerful force at sea. The United States cancelled two of the six Iowa-class battleships before the war was over. The US had planned to build an entirely new battleship class after Iowa too: The 65,000-ton Montana-class with twelve 16-inch (406mm) guns. However, the Navy cancelled their construction by 1943.

Still, during that war and those that followed until their final retirement in the 1990s, the four built Iowa-class battleships—USS Iowa, USS New Jersey, USS Missouri, and USS Wisconsin—were an active part the mightiest war fleet the world has ever known for a few decades (the ships were decommissioned and commissioned again a couple times.) The 80s saw 32 Tomahawk and 16 Harpoon missiles, as well as four Phalanx systems designed to defend the Iowas against anti-ship missiles, added to these impressive war vessels.

Nuclear guns

The Iowa battleships were also the only ships in the US Navy capable of firing nuclear shells. They gained that capability in the 1950s and, in theory, they had it until the ships' retirement (the US Navy's nuclear shells weren't completely decommissioned until 2004.) The shells were called W23, "an adaptation of the W19 nuclear artillery shell was developed specifically for the 16-inch (406 mm) guns" with a "estimated yield of 15 to 20 kilotons of TNT [which made the] Iowa-class battleship's 16 in guns the world's largest nuclear artillery." Can you imagine those guns firing nuclear shells?

Perhaps the Navy should send one of these to the game against Germany next Thursday. It seems like the only way to stop Muller und freunde.


World War II

Shipyards and the U.S. government learned invaluable lessons about shipbuilding during World War I. The United States began increasing the size of its merchant fleet in 1936, well before it entered the Second World War. The goal quickly became building sturdy, reliable ships in a hurry&mdashfaster than German submarines could sink them. By 1943, American shipyards turned out three a day&mdashnearly 3,300 over the course of the war.

To build the merchant fleet, the U.S. Maritime Commission expanded existing shipyards and built new ones along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts. To simplify and speed construction, the ships they produced would be virtually identical. The types of ships designed for emergency construction were called &ldquoLiberty&rdquo and &ldquoVictory&rdquo ships.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

&ldquoWendy the Welder&rdquo and &ldquoRosie the Riveter&rdquo

Women entered the work force in history-making numbers during World War II. At the peak of wartime production in 1943, women made up more than 10 percent of the work force in most of the shipyards. Although &ldquoRosie the Riveter&rdquo was their symbol, there actually were few women riveters. &ldquoWendy the Welder&rdquo is closer to the truth, since women helped assemble the first generation of welded ships. These women are chipping excess metal from a welded joint at Baltimore’s Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards.

Shipyard Sisters

Maria Isabel Solis Thomas worked as a welder at the Richmond, Calif., shipyard during the war. Small and trim, she and her sister Elvia could work even in the most cramped areas of the ship. She recalled, I was so proud because, man, I did it just exactly the way they wanted (me) to. And here I come out, and they said, ‘Hi Shorty. You did pretty good.’

Maria Solis Thomas (right) and sister Elvia with friends in San Francisco, 1944

Courtesy of the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project, Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, University of Texas at Austin

Absentees Sabotage Ships

Work incentive posters were used to pressure shipyards and their workers to keep up production. Posters stressed the importance of shipbuilding to the nation. Missing a day of work was unpatriotic.

Courtesy of the U.S. Maritime Commission

Temporary Housing

The rush of workers into shipyards strained housing and school systems in coastal communities around the country. Many shipyards built whole neighborhoods of prefabricated homes for their employees, or brought in trailers like these at the North Carolina Shipbuilding Co. in Wilmington, 1942.

Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Traveling Schoolchildren

World War II scrambled American society. Jobs in shipyards brought men, women, and families to parts of the country they had never visited before. In their new homes, they often lived and worked among people of many different backgrounds. In 1942, Photographer Dorothea Lange took this photograph in Richmond, California, noting, &ldquoEvery hand up signifies a child not born in California.&rdquo

Courtesy of The Dorothea Lange Collection, Oakland Museum of California, City of Oakland

Are you missing from this picture?

The U.S. Maritime Commission recruited shipyard workers with posters like this, about 1944.

Courtesy of the U.S. Maritime Commission

Full-Time Work

In wartime shipyards, like this one in Baltimore, workers labored around the clock. Two months before Pearl Harbor, the first Liberty ship, named for the Revolutionary War patriot Patrick Henry, was launched in Chesapeake Bay.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Courtesy of the U.S. Maritime Commission

Launching Day

Launching ceremonies were public events, meant to lift morale among workers as well as other citizens. Most of the launching sponsors were women, chosen because of some connection to the ship or the community.

The Liberty ship Peter Donahue, named for the founder of Union Iron Works in San Francisco, was launched on February 12, 1943, in Sausalito, California, with many Boy Scouts present. The sponsor, Mrs. Thomas C. Nelson, was the mother of two Eagle Scouts, one of whom was missing in action with the U.S. Navy at the time.

Silver dollar launching, 1942

Launching gangs were responsible for ensuring a smooth transition as the ship slid from land to water. Shipwright Archie Green received this coin from his crew leader to commemorate the successful launching of a C3 cargo ship in San Francisco.

Building Victories

Victory ships are under construction at California Shipbuilding Corp., Los Angeles, 1944.

Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Pre-Fabricated and Pre-Assembled

To build ships as quickly as possible, workers pieced them together assembly-line fashion from pre-made sections built at the shipyard. About 120 large units, made up of some 250,000 items, went into building each ship.

Transfer from the U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Maritime Commission (through J.M. Winston)

Oil Tanker

American shipyards mass-produced tankers as well as cargo ships. Some 533 oil tankers like this were built during the war.

Lunch Break

Workers take their lunch break at Permanente Metals Yard No. 1, Richmond, California, 1944.