USS Enterprise Launched - History

USS Enterprise Launched - History

(9/24/60) The USS Enterprise was the first aircraft carrier to be powered by nuclear reactors. The nuclear reactors freed the Enterprise from the need for refueling.

USS Enterprise (CVN 65)

USS ENTERPRISE - the Navy's eighth ship to bear the name - was the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. During her more than 50 years of service she has set many records and milestones including steaming with a speed of more than 40 knots during her sea trials after construction. Later, she became the first nuclear carrier to transit the Suez Canal and the first carrier to operate the F-14 fighter aircraft. Additionally, the ENTERPRISE is still the longest warship ever put to sea.

Deactivated at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on December 1, 2012, the ENTERPRISE was towed to the nearby Newport News Shipbuilding Shipyard at Newport News, Va., for dismantling on June 20, 2013. Defueling of ENTERPRISE's last reactor took place at Newport News in December 2016. She will now be prepared for the tow to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., for the final dismantling. At the moment, scrapping is scheduled to be completed by 2025.

General Characteristics: Keel Laid: Februar 4, 1958
Launched: September 24, 1960
Commissioned: November 25, 1961
Deactivated: December 1, 2012
Decommissioned: February 3, 2017
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Va.
Propulsion system: eight nuclear reactors
Propellers: four
Blades on each Propeller: five
Aircraft elevators: four
Catapults: four
Arresting gear cables: four
Lenght, overall: 1,123 feet (342.3 meters)
Flight Deck Width: 257 feet (78.4 meters)
Area of flight deck: about 4,5 acres (18211.5 m 2 )
Beam: 132.8 feet (40.5 meters)
Draft: 39 feet (11.9 meters)
Displacement: approx. 93,500 tons full load
Speed: 30+ knots
Planes: approx. 85
Crew: Ship: 3,200 Air Wing: 2,480
Armament: three Mk 29 NATO Sea Sparrow launchers, three 20mm Phalanx CIWS Mk 15

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS ENTERPRISE. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS ENTERPRISE Cruise Books:

  • USS ENTERPRISE is the eighth ship in the Navy named "ENTERPRISE".
  • USS ENTERPRISE was commissioned without any armament.
  • USS ENTERPRISE was initially planned to become the first ship in a class of six aircraft carriers. However, the extremely high costs cancelled the project and USS ENTERPRISE remained a unique ship.
  • USS ENTERPRISE was the second ship in the Navy which received the 20mm Phalanx CIWS Mk 15.
  • USS ENTERPRISE was the second nuclear-powered water surface vessel in the world.

Accidents aboard USS ENTERPRISE:

On its way to the coast of Vietnam the carrier conducts flight operations. During the arming of an F-4 Phantom one of the aircraft's Zuni missiles detonates causing a fire that quickly spreads to other armed planes and causes some of their bombs and missiles to explode, too. ENTERPRISE subsequently turns into the wind to keep the flames away from the isle.

One hour later, the fire on the flight deck was under control but there were still fires below decks which took additional hours to be extinguished.

During the eight explosions and the resulting fires aboard USS ENTERPRISE, 27 crewmen were killed and 85 were injured.

ENTERPRISE suffers heavy damage including three holes in the flight deck (one of them through two decks). 15 aircraft were destroyed or damaged.

Click here for a detailed report of the accident from the USS ENTERPRISE WestPac Cruise Book 1969.

Click here to view more USS ENTERPRISE Patches.

Click here to view more photos.

Broward Navy Days

The following images were taken by Howard Walsh jr. They were taken in Port Everglades, FL, during the Broward Navy Days in 2000.

The two photos below were taken by Karl-Heinz Ahles when USS ENTERPRISE was inport Norfolk, Va., on May 11, 1999, respectively in September 1998.

The photos below were taken by me and show the USS ENTERPRISE at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on October 27 and 29, 2010, after completing the Composite Training Unit Exercise in preparation for her upcoming and final deployment.

Deactivation

The photos below are official US Navy photos taken during the deactivation ceremony of USS ENTERPRISE at Naval Station Norfolk on December 1, 2012.

The photos below are official US Navy photos taken on June 20, 2013, and showing the ENTERPRISE being towed from Naval Base Norfolk to Newport News Shipbuilding for dismantling. Most striking is the carrier's missing main mast.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning on October 28, 2013, and show the deactivated ENTERPRISE at Newport News Shipbuilding.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning on October 24, 2014, and show the deactivated ENTERPRISE at Newport News Shipbuilding.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning on October 4, 2017, and show the ENTERPRISE at Newport News Shipbuilding where she is slowly dismantled.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning on September 23, 2018, and show the ENTERPRISE at Newport News Shipbuilding.


Sunday Ship History: USS Enterprise (CV-6)


Seventy-one years ago, the U.S. Navy commissioned its seventh ship named Enterprise. This Enterprise went on to become the "most decorated" Navy ship of World War II, and a continuation of the traditions established by its predecessors. Her history is exceptionally well set out here:

Enterprise 's scout planes arrived over Pearl Harbor during the attack and, though surprised, immediately went into action in defense of the naval base. The carrier, meanwhile, launched her remaining aircraft in a fruitless search for the Japanese striking force. Enterprise put into Pearl Harbor for fuel and supplies on December and sailed early the next morning to patrol against possible additional attacks on the Hawaiian Islands. While the group did not encounter any surface ships, Enterprise aircraft scored a kill by sinking the Japanese submarine 1-170 in 23º 45' N., 155º 35' W., on 10 December 1941.

During the last two weeks of December 1941, Enterprise and her group steamed to the westward of Hawaii to cover those islands while two other carrier groups made a belated attempt to relieve Wake Island. After a brief rest at Pearl Harbor, the Enterprise group sailed on 11 January 1942 to protect convoys reinforcing Samoa. On 1 February the task force dealt a hard blow to Kwajalein, Wotje, and Maloelap in the Marshall Islands, sinking three ships, damaging eight, and destroying numerous airplanes and ground facilities. Enterprise received only minor damage in the Japanese counterattack, as her force retired to Pearl Harbor.

During the next month Enterprise's force swept the central Pacific, blasting enemy installations on Wake and Marcus Islands, then received minor alterations and repairs at Pearl Harbor. On 8 April 1942 she departed to rendezvous with USS Hornet (CV 8) and sail westward to launch 16 Army B-25 bombers in a raid on Tokyo. While Enterprise fighters flew combat air patrol, the B-25s roared into the air on 18 April and raced undetected the 600 miles to their target. The task force, its presence known to the enemy, reversed course and returned to Pearl Harbor on 25 April.

Five days later, the "Big E" was speeding toward the South Pacific to reinforce the U.S. carriers operating in the Coral Sea. Distance proved too great to conquer in time, and the Battle of the Coral Sea was history before Enterprise could reach her destination. Ordered back to Hawaii, the carrier entered Pearl Harbor on 26 May and began intensive preparations to meet the expected Japanese thrust at Midway Island. Two days later she sortied as flagship of Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander Task Force 16 (CTF 16), with orders "to hold Midway and inflict maximum damage on the enemy by strong attrition tactics." With Enterprise in TF 16 were Hornet , 6 cruisers, and 10 destroyers. On 30 May, TF 17, Rear Admiral Frank J. Fletcher in USS Yorktown (CV 5) , with two cruisers, and six destroyers, sailed to support TF 16 as senior officer, Rear Admiral Fletcher became "Officer in Tactical Command."

The battle was joined on the morning of 4 June 1942 when four Japanese carriers, unaware of the presence of U.S. forces, launched attacks on Midway Island. Just 3 hours after the first bomb fell on Midway, planes from Hornet struck the enemy force, and 30 minutes later Enterprise and Yorktown aircraft streaked in to join in smashing the Japanese carriers. Each side hurled attacks at the other during the day in one of history's most decisive battles. Though the forces were in contact to 7 June, by the end of the 4th the outcome had been decided and the tide of the war in the Pacific had been turned in the United States' favor. Yorktown and USS Hammann (DD-412) were the only United States ships sunk, but TFs 16 and 17 lost a total of 113 planes, 61 of them in combat, during the battle. Japanese losses, far more severe, consisted of 4 carriers, one cruiser, and 272 carrier aircraft. Enterprise and all other ships of TFs 16 and 17 came through undamaged, returning to Pearl Harbor on 13 June 1942.

After a month of rest and overhaul, Enterprise sailed on 15 July for the South Pacific where she joined TF 61 to support the amphibious landings in the Solomon Islands on 8 August. For the next 2 weeks, the carrier and her planes guarded seaborne communication lines southwest of the Solomons. On 24 August 1942, a strong Japanese force was sighted some 200 miles north of Guadalcanal and TF 61 sent planes to the attack. An enemy light carrier was sent to the bottom and the Japanese troops intended for Guadalcanal were forced back. Enterprise suffered most heavily of the United States ships, 3 direct hits and 4 near misses killed 74, wounded 9S, and inflicted serious damage on the carrier. But well-trained damage control parties, and quick hard work patched her up so that she was able to return to Hawaii under her own power.

Repaired at Pearl Harbor from 10 September to 16 October 1942, Enterprise departed once more for the South Pacific where with Hornet , she formed TF 61. On 26 October, Enterprise scout planes located a Japanese carrier force and the Battle of the Santa Cruz Island was underway. Enterprise aircraft struck carriers, battleships, and cruisers during the struggle, while the "Big E" herself underwent intensive attack. Hit twice by bombs, Enterprise lost 44 killed and had 75 wounded. Despite serious damage, she continued in action and took on board a large number of planes from Hornet when that carrier had to be abandoned. Though the American losses of a carrier and a destroyer were more severe than the Japanese loss of one light cruiser, the battle gained priceless time to reinforce Guadalcanal against the next enemy onslaught.

Enterprise entered Noumea, New Caledonia, on 30 October 1942 for repairs, but a new Japanese thrust at the Solomons demanded her presence and she sailed on 11 November, repair crews from USS Vestal (AR-4) still on board, working vigorously. Two days later, "Big E" planes swarmed down on an enemy force and disabled a battleship which was sunk later by other American aircraft, and on 14 November, aviators from Enterprise helped to despatch a heavy cruiser. When the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal ended on 15 November 1942, Enterprise had shared in sinking 16 ships and damaging 8 more. The carrier returned to Noumea on 16 November to complete her repairs.

Sailing again on 4 December, Enterprise trained out of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, until 28 January 1943 when she departed for the Solomons area. On 30 January her fighters flew combat air patrol for a cruiser- destroyer group during the Battle of Rennell Island. Despite the destruction of a large majority of the attacking Japanese bombers by Enterprise planes, USS Chicago (CA-29) was sunk by aerial torpedoes. Detached after the battle, the carrier arrived at Espiritu Santo on 1 February, and for the next 3 months operated out of that base, covering U.S. surface forces up to the Solomons. Enterprise then steamed to Pearl Harbor where on 27 May 1943, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz presented the ship with the first Presidential Unit Citation won by an aircraft carrier. On 20 July 1943 she entered Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Wash., for a much needed overhaul.

Back in action waters by mid-November, Enterprise joined in providing close air support to the Marines landing on Makin Island, from 19 to 21 November. On the night of 26 November 1943, the "Big E" introduced carrier-based night fighter operations in the Pacific when a three-plane team from the ship broke up a large group of land-based bombers attacking TG 50.2. After heavy strike by aircraft of TF 50 against Kwajalein on 4 December, Enterprise returned to Pearl Harbor six days later. The carrier's next operation was with TF 58 in softening up the Marshall Islands and supporting the landings on Kwajalein, from 29 January to 3 February 1944. Then Enterprise sailed, still with TF 58, to strike the Japanese naval base at Truk in the Caroline Islands, on 7 February. Again the "Big E" made aviation history when she launched the first night radar bombing attack from any U.S. carrier. The 12 torpedo bombers in this strike achieved excellent results, accounting for nearly one-third of the 200,000 tons of shipping destroyed by the aircraft of the task force.

Detached from TF 58, Enterprise launched raids on Jaluit Atoll on 20 February, then steamed to Majuro and Espiritu Santo. Sailing 15 March 1944 in TG 36.1, she provided air cover and close support for the landings on Emirau Island (19-25 March). The carrier rejoined CF 58 on 26 March and for the next 12 days joined in the series of hard-hitting strikes against the Yap, Ulithi, Woleai, and the Palau Islands. After a week's rest and replenishment at Majuro, Enterprise sailed 14 April to support landings in the Hollandia area of few Guinea, and then hit Truk again (29-30 April).

On 6 June 1944, the "Big E" and her companions of TG 58.3 sortied from Majuro to strike with the rest of TF 58, the Mariana Islands. Blasting Saipan, Rota, and Guam between 11 and 14 June, Enterprise pilots gave direct support to the landings on Saipan on 15 June, and covered the troops ashore for the next two days. Aware of a major Japanese attempt to break up the invasion of Saipan, Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander 6th Fleet, positioned TF 58 to meet the thrust. On 19 June 1944 took place the greatest carrier aircraft battle in history. For over eight hours airmen of the United States and Imperial Japanese navies fought in the skies over TF 58 and the Marianas. By the end of the day, a United States victory was apparent, and at the conclusion of the strikes against the Japanese fleet on 20 June, the triumph became complete. Six American ships had been damaged, and 130 planes and a total of 76 pilots and aircrewmen had been lost. But with a major assist from U.S. submarines, 3 Japanese carriers were sunk, and 426 ship-based aircraft were destroyed. Japanese naval aviation never recovered from this blow.

The Battle of the Philippine Sea over, Enterprise and her companions continued to support the Saipan campaign through 5 July 1944. Enterprise then sailed for Pearl Harbor and a month of rest and overhaul. Back in action waters on 24 August, the carrier sailed with TF 38 in that force's aerial assault on the Volcano and Bonin Islands from 31 August to 2 September, and Yap, Ulithi, and the Palaus from 6 to 8 September. After operating west of the Palau Islands, the "Big E" joined other units of TF 38 on 7 October, and shaped course to the northward. From 10 to 20 October her aviators roared over Okinawa, Formosa, and the Philippines, blasting enemy airfields, shore installations, and shipping in preparation for the assault on Leyte. After supporting the Leyte landings on 20 October, Enterprise headed for Ulithi to replenish but the approach of the Japanese fleet on 23 October, brought her racing back into action. In the Battle for Leyte Gulf (23-26 October), Enterprise planes struck all three groups of enemy forces, battering battleships and destroyers before the action ended. The carrier remained on patrol east of Samar and Leyte until the end of October, then retired to Ulithi for supplies. During November, her aircraft struck targets in the Manila area, and the island of Yap. The "Big E" returned to Pearl Harbor on 6 December 1944.

Sailing 24 December for the Philippine area, Enterprise carried on board an air group specially trained in night carrier operations. She joined TG 38.5 and swept the waters north of Luzon and of the China Sea during January of 1945, striking shore targets and shipping from Formosa to Indochina. After a brief visit to Ulithi, the "Big E" joined TG 58.5 on 10 February 1945 and provided day and night combat air patrol for TF 58 as it struck Tokyo on 16 and 17 February. She then supported the Marines on Iwo Jima from the day of the landings, 19 February 1945, until 9 March when she sailed for Ulithi. During one part of that period, Enterprise kept aircraft aloft continuously over Iwo Jima for 174 hours. Departing Ulithi 15 March, the carrier continued her night work in raids against Kyushu, Honshu, and shipping in the Inland Sea of Japan. Damaged slightly by an enemy bomb on 18 March, Enterprise entered Ulithi six days later for repairs. Back in action on 5 April, she supported the Okinawa operation until again damaged (11 April), this time by a suicide plane, and forced back to Ulithi. Off Okinawa once more on 6 May 1945, Enterprise flew patrols around the clock as the menace of the kamikaze increased. On 14 May 1945, the "Big E" suffered her last wound of World War II when a suicide plane destroyed her forward elevator, killing 14 and wounding 34 men. The carrier sailed for repairs at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving 7 June 1945.

Click on the pictures to make them bigger.

UPDATE: A CV-6 website here from which:

  1. Pearl Harbor
    Anti-Submarine Action, Class B Assessment (December 7-10, 1941)
  2. Pacific Raids
    Marshall-Gilbert Islands (February 1, 1942)
    Wake Island (February 24, 1942)
    Marcus Island (March 4, 1942)
  3. Battle of Midway (June 4-6, 1942)
  4. Battle of Guadalcanal
    Invasion by USMC 1st Division (August 7-9, 1942)
  5. Capture and Defense of Guadalcanal (August 10-25, 1942)
  6. Battle of the Eastern Solomons (August 24, 1942)
  7. Battle of Santa Cruz (October 26, 1942)
  8. Naval Battle of Guadalcanal (November 13-15, 1942)
  9. Battle of Rennell Island (January 29-30, 1943)
  10. Gilbert Islands Operations
    Invasion of Makin Island (November 19 - December 4, 1943)
  11. Marshall Islands Operations
    Invasion of Kwajalein (January 28 - February 8, 1944)
    Maloelap/Taroa Raid
  12. Asiatic-Pacific Raids
    Truk Islands (February 16-17, 1944) Palau, Yap, Ulithi, Woleai (March 30 - April 1, 1944) Truk Islands (April 29 - May 1, 1944)
  13. Hollandia (New Guinea) Operations (April 21-24, 1944)
    Invasion (April 22, 1944)
  14. Mariana Islands Operations
    Capture and Occupation of Saipan (June 11-24, 1944)
    Mariana Turkey Shoot (June 19, 1944)
    First Battle of the Philippine Sea (June 20, 1944)
    "The night they turned on the lights" (June 20, 1944)
  15. Western Pacific Operations
    Raids on Bonin Islands, Chichi Jima (August 31 - September 2, 1944)
    Raid on Caroline Islands, Yap (September 6, 1944)
    Raid on Palau Islands (September 10-16, 1944)
    Invasion and Capture of Peleliu (September 16, 1944)
    Raid on Okinawa (October 10, 1944)
    Raid on Formosa (October 12, 1944)
    Raid on Manila (October 15-18, 1944
  16. Invasion of Leyte Island/3rd Fleet Operations
    Luzon Attacks (October 15 and 17-19, 1944)
    Battle of Leyte Gulf (October 24-26, 1944)
  17. Luzon Operations
    Invasion of Luzon (January 6-7, 1945)
    Formosa Raids (January 3, 4, 9, 15, 1945)
    South China Sea Attacks (January 12-16, 1945)
  18. Night Carrier Group 90/5th Fleet Raids
    Tokyo and Honshu Raids (February 15-16, 1945)
  19. Assault and Occupation of Iwo Jima (February 23 - March 12, 1945)
  20. Okinawa Operations
    Pre-Invasion Raids on Kyushu (March 18-20, 1945)
    Invasion and Capture of Okinawa (April 7 - May 15, 1945)
    Kyushu and Shikoku Raids (May 11-16, 1945)

For a terrific collection of action photos, go here and choose a a topic.

The last surviving prewar carrier (Saratoga was destroyed by an atomic bomb test in 1946), the only carrier to fight at Pearl Harbor, the only surviving carrier from Midway and the Guadalcanal campaign, the ship which at one point was the only U.S. carrier left to fight in the Pacific, Enterprise was one of a handful of truly great ships in history: Constitution, Victory, Constellation, Enterprise.

Still, there were those who felt that Enterprise's greatness was more than could be preserved by simply preserving the ship: it was the efficiency and fighting spirit of her men, the blessing of Fortune, her knack for being where she was needed most, and the affection and respect she instilled in all who served with her. Alvin Kernan writes in "Crossing The Line":

". I couldn't bear to think of her sitting around in some backwater, being exploited in unworthy ways, invaded by hordes of tourists with no sense of her greatness. Better by far, I thought, to leave her to memory of those who had served on her when she was fully alive, vibrating under full steam at thirty-two knots, the aircraft turning up, guns firing, heeling over so sharply that the hangar deck took on water to avoid the bombs."


U.S.S. ENTERPRISE

Enterprise has the distinction of being both the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the longest carrier in the world. Launched in 1960 and Commissioned in 1961, it’s the oldest vessel still in use in the U.S. Navy Fleet. Known as “Big E,” she’s due to be decommissioned in 2013.

Due to cost, she is the only ship in her class and the only one to have more than two nuclear reactors aboard.

Over her long and impressive career, she has participated in the following:

  • Tracking for the Friendship 7 space capsule that orbited the earth
  • Formed part of the blockade during the Cuban Missile Crisis
  • Operation Sea Orbit to sail the world
  • As part of 7 th Fleet, launched aircraft and sorties to fight the Viet Cong
  • Task Force 71 –protection of reconnaissance patrols over international waters
  • Sent sorties for attacks on South Vietnam
  • Intimidation of the Navy of India during the Indo-Pakistani War
  • Disaster relief for Typhoon Gervaise on Mauitius Island.
  • Operation Frequent Wind for the evacuation of contingencies in Vietnam
  • Numerous WESTPAC deployments
  • Various operations in the Middle East
  • Training exercises with the British Royal Navy

Enterprise is scheduled for decommissioning in 2013. The decommissioning process is expected to take longer than with previous carriers, due to the nuclear reactors.


USS RANGER (CV-4)

The Ranger was the first U.S. Navy ship to be designed and built from the keel up as an aircraft carrier. Her keel was laid at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co, Newport News, Virginia on 26 Sep 31. She was launched on 25 Feb 33 and commissioned on 4 Jun 34.

USS Ranger was returning to Norfolk, Virginia from an ocean patrol extending to Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. At that time, the Ranger Air Group consisted of:

Fighting Squadron Five (VF-5) with 18 Grumman F4F-3 and 1 F4F-3A Wildcats
Fighting Squadron Forty One (VF-41) with 17 Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats and 2 North American SNJ-3s
Scouting Squadron Forty One (VS-41) with 8 Vought SB2U-1 and 2 SB2U-2 Vindicators
Scouting Squadron Forty Two (VS-42) with 9 Vought SB2U-1 and 6 SB2U-2 Vindicators
Torpedo Squadron Four (VT-4) with 3 Douglas TBD-1 Devastators


Contents

Final mission at Narendra III

In 2344, the Enterprise responded to a distress call from the Klingon outpost on Narendra III, which was under attack by the Romulan Star Empire. When the Enterprise arrived at the outpost, she was engaged by four Romulan warbirds. The ship suffered major damage to her warp nacelles and external hull, with 125 crew members surviving.

During the firefight, a temporal rift was created. The ship entered it and, almost instantly, emerged from it. ( TNG : " Yesterday's Enterprise ")

Creation of an alternate history

The severely damaged Enterprise drifted through the rift, emerging in the year 2366 (precisely twenty-two years, three months, and four days later), and encountered her successor, the Galaxy-class USS Enterprise-D. The crew discovered that the outpost at Narendra III had been completely destroyed, and a state of war existed between the Klingon Empire and the Federation. Both crews eventually realized that the current timeline was a result of the Enterprise-C's absence from the battle, and determined that the Enterprise-C needed to return to its own time through the rift.

The Enterprise emerges in the future

While the Enterprise-D assisted in repairs, both ships soon came under attack from the Klingons, and Captain Garrett was subsequently killed.

Lieutenant Natasha Yar, the Enterprise-D's tactical officer, learned from Guinan that, if the Enterprise-C was successful, in the new timeline that would be created she would die a meaningless death. Not comfortable with that idea, Yar requested and was granted a transfer to the Enterprise-C.

The last surviving senior officer of the Enterprise-C, Lt. Richard Castillo, assumed command of the ship and, under the protection of the Enterprise-D, took her back into the rift to return to 2344. ( TNG : " Yesterday's Enterprise ")

Back to 2344

The Enterprise returns to its proper time

The Enterprise-C returned at the same time it left its timeline. It engaged the Romulans and was eventually destroyed. In the aftermath of the battle, the Klingons were deeply impressed by the act of self-sacrifice by a Starfleet crew to protect a Klingon outpost, and the Enterprise's ultimate legacy was reinforcing the relations between the Klingon Empire and the United Federation of Planets, leading to a close alliance of peace.

A number of the ship's crewmembers, including Yar, were captured by the Romulans and held prisoner. Yar later gave birth to a half-Romulan daughter named Sela. ( TNG : " Redemption II ")

Legacy

Starfleet did not commission another Enterprise until nearly two decades later in 2363. ( TNG : " Redemption II ")

Featured in a display (second from top) of all Federation ships named Enterprise prior to 2364

Commander William T. Riker's questions on Professor Berlinghoff Rasmussen's questionnaire dealt mostly with previous Starfleet ships, including innovations of the Enterprise-C. ( TNG : " A Matter of Time ")


Appendices

Appearances

References

    :
    • " A Man Alone "
    • " Q-Less "
    • " The Forsaken "
    • " Paradise "
    • " Tribunal "
    • " Defiant "
    • " Heart of Stone "
    • " The Way of the Warrior "
    • " Hippocratic Oath "
    • " Crossfire "
    • " Bar Association "
    • " Rules of Engagement "
    • " Trials and Tribble-ations "
    • " Sons and Daughters "
    • " Change of Heart "
    • " Image in the Sand "
    • " Death Wish "
    • " False Profits "
    • " The Q and the Grey "
    • " Alter Ego "
    • " Scorpion "
    • " Pathfinder "
    • " The End is the Beginning "
    • " The Impossible Box "
    • " Nepenthe "
    • " Cupid's Errant Arrow "
    • " Terminal Provocations "

    Background information

    The Enterprise-D model was designed by Andrew Probert. The basic layout of the ship was derived from a painting Probert had done following Star Trek: The Motion Picture of how he would redesign the Enterprise had he been allowed to break with the basic plan Matt Jefferies and Joe Jennings created for Star Trek: Phase II. When he was hired to work in the Star Trek: The Next Generation art department, he brought the painting with him and hung it in his office, then set to work on the design of the bridge. Out of pure luck, David Gerrold saw the painting and brought it to Gene Roddenberry's attention. Roddenberry immediately approved the general direction. Probert further refined the design into the familiar shape however, he originally conceived the battle section as a smaller vessel shaped like a "D" which detached from an area on the saucer. Later, the producers informed him that they wanted the ship to split in two and have the engineering hull serve as the battle section. This presented an additional problem for Probert, as he needed to figure out some way to fulfill the producers' requests while keeping the original lines of the design. Eventually, he found a way to incorporate a separation using the approved design, and after several more minor changes, the design reached its final form. Roddenberry's only requests were to lengthen the ends of the warp nacelles and to keep the bridge on the top of the saucer section rather than within the ship. Roddenberry felt that having the bridge on the exterior gave a sense of scale to the vessel.

    Two versions of the filming miniature were built by Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) for the first season: a large six-foot model and a smaller less-detailed two-foot model, both constructed under the supervision of Ease Owyeung. Both were capable of saucer separation. The cost to construct the original models was US$75,000. For the third season, Greg Jein built a new four-foot miniature. It was not built to separate, but for the first time it accurately depicted the Ten Forward windows. It first appeared in TNG : " The Defector " and completely replaced the previous two models, although stock footage of the original models was still used. The six-foot model was briefly reused for the saucer separation in " The Best of Both Worlds, Part II ". It was completely refurbished and overhauled for Star Trek Generations , where it represented the Enterprise alongside a computer generated version and a special twelve-foot wide saucer, created for the crash sequence. ILM crewmember Bill George relabeled the registry on the saucer to "NCC-1701-E" before the model was returned to the Paramount archives. The four-foot model was modified into the three-nacelled Enterprise from " All Good Things. " and later partially restored to become the USS Odyssey in " The Jem'Hadar " and the USS Venture in " The Way of the Warrior ".


    USS Enterprise Launched - History

    The seventh USS Enterprise (CV 6) was launched October 3, 1936 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va. sponsored by Mrs. Claude A. Swanson, wife of the Secretary of the Navy and commissioned May 12, 1938, Captain N. H. White in command.

    Enterprise sailed south on a shakedown cruise which took her to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. After her return she operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean until April of 1939 when she was ordered to duty in the Pacific. Based first out of San Diego and then in Pearl Harbor, the carrier trained herself and her aircraft squadrons for any eventuality, and carried aircraft among the island bases of the Pacific. USS Enterprise had just completed one such mission, delivering Marine Corps Fighter Squadron 211 to Wake Island on December 2, 1941, and was en route to Hawaii when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.

    Enterprise's scout planes arrived over Pearl Harbor during the attack and, though surprised, immediately went into action in defense of the naval base. The carrier, meanwhile, launched her remaining aircraft in a fruitless search for the Japanese striking force. Enterprise put into Pearl Harbor for fuel and supplies on December and sailed early the next morning to patrol against possible additional attacks on the Hawaiian Islands. While the group did not encounter any surface ships, her aircraft scored a kill by sinking the Japanese submarine 1-170 in 23º 45' N., 155º 35' W., on December 10th.

    During the last two weeks of December, the carrier and her group steamed to the westward of Hawaii to cover those islands while two other carrier groups made a belated attempt to relieve Wake Island. After a brief rest at Pearl Harbor, the USS Enterprise group sailed on January 11, 1942 to protect convoys reinforcing Samoa. On February 1 the task force dealt a hard blow to Kwajalein, Wotje, and Maloelap in the Marshall Islands, sinking three ships, damaging eight, and destroying numerous airplanes and ground facilities. CV 6 received only minor damage in the Japanese counterattack, as her force retired to Pearl Harbor.

    During the next month Enterprise's force swept the central Pacific, blasting enemy installations on Wake and Marcus Islands, then received minor alterations and repairs at Pearl Harbor. On April 8, 1942 USS Enterprise departed to rendezvous with USS Hornet (CV 8) and sail westward to launch 16 Army B-25 bombers in a raid on Tokyo. While Enterprise fighters flew combat air patrol, the B-25s roared into the air on April 18 and raced undetected the 600 miles to their target. The task force, its presence known to the enemy, reversed course and returned to Pearl Harbor on April 25th.

    Five days later, the "Big E" was speeding toward the South Pacific to reinforce the U.S. carriers operating in the Coral Sea. Distance proved too great to conquer in time, and the Battle of the Coral Sea was history before Enterprise could reach her destination. Ordered back to Hawaii, the carrier entered Pearl Harbor on May 26 and began intensive preparations to meet the expected Japanese thrust at Midway Island. Two days later she sortied as flagship of Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander Task Force 16 (CTF 16), with orders "to hold Midway and inflict maximum damage on the enemy by strong attrition tactics." With USS Enterprise in TF 16 were Hornet, 6 cruisers, and 10 destroyers. On May 30, TF 17, Rear Admiral Frank J. Fletcher in USS Yorktown (CV 5), with two cruisers, and six destroyers, sailed to support TF 16 as senior officer, Rear Admiral Fletcher became "Officer in Tactical Command."

    The battle was joined on the morning of June 4, 1942 when four Japanese carriers, unaware of the presence of U.S. forces, launched attacks on Midway Island. Just 3 hours after the first bomb fell on Midway, planes from Hornet struck the enemy force, and 30 minutes later Enterprise and Yorktown aircraft streaked in to join in smashing the Japanese carriers. Each side hurled attacks at the other during the day in one of history's most decisive battles. Though the forces were in contact to June 7, by the end of the 4th the outcome had been decided and the tide of the war in the Pacific had been turned in the United States' favor. Yorktown and USS Hammann (DD 412) were the only United States ships sunk, but TFs 16 and 17 lost a total of 113 planes, 61 of them in combat, during the battle. Japanese losses, far more severe, consisted of 4 carriers, one cruiser, and 272 carrier aircraft. Enterprise and all other ships of TFs 16 and 17 came through undamaged, returning to Pearl Harbor on June 13, 1942.

    After a month of rest and overhaul, USS Enterprise sailed on July 15, for the South Pacific where she joined TF 61 to support the amphibious landings in the Solomon Islands on August 8th. For the next 2 weeks, the carrier and her planes guarded seaborne communication lines southwest of the Solomons. On August 24, 1942, a strong Japanese force was sighted some 200 miles north of Guadalcanal and TF 61 sent planes to the attack. An enemy light carrier was sent to the bottom and the Japanese troops intended for Guadalcanal were forced back. Enterprise suffered most heavily of the United States ships, 3 direct hits and 4 near misses killed 74, wounded 98, and inflicted serious damage on the carrier. But well-trained damage control parties, and quick hard work patched her up so that she was able to return to Hawaii under her own power.

    Repaired at Pearl Harbor from September 10 to October 16, 1942, CV 6 departed once more for the South Pacific where with Hornet, she formed TF 61. On October 26th, the carrier scout planes located a Japanese carrier force and the Battle of the Santa Cruz Island was underway. Enterprise aircraft struck carriers, battleships, and cruisers during the struggle, while the "Big E" herself underwent intensive attack. Hit twice by bombs, USS Enterprise lost 44 killed and had 75 wounded. Despite serious damage, she continued in action and took on board a large number of planes from Hornet when that carrier had to be abandoned. Though the American losses of a carrier and a destroyer were more severe than the Japanese loss of one light cruiser, the battle gained priceless time to reinforce Guadalcanal against the next enemy onslaught.

    USS Enterprise entered Noumea, New Caledonia, on October 30, 1942 for repairs, but a new Japanese thrust at the Solomons demanded her presence and she sailed on November 11, repair crews from USS Vestal (AR 4) still on board, working vigorously. Two days later, "Big E" planes swarmed down on an enemy force and disabled a battleship which was sunk later by other American aircraft, and on November 14, aviators from Enterprise helped to despatch a heavy cruiser. When the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal ended on November 15th, CV 6 had shared in sinking 16 ships and damaging 8 more. The carrier returned to Noumea on November 16 to complete her repairs.

    Sailing again on December 4th, USS Enterprise trained out of Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, until January 28, 1943 when she departed for the Solomons area. On January 30 her fighters flew combat air patrol for a cruiser-destroyer group during the Battle of Rennell Island. Despite the destruction of a large majority of the attacking Japanese bombers by Enterprise planes, USS Chicago (CA 29) was sunk by aerial torpedoes. Detached after the battle, the carrier arrived at Espiritu Santo on February 1st, and for the next 3 months operated out of that base, covering U.S. surface forces up to the Solomons. The ship then steamed to Pearl Harbor where on May 27, 1943, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz presented the ship with the first Presidential Unit Citation won by an aircraft carrier. On July 20, 1943 she entered Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Wash., for a much needed overhaul.

    Back in action waters by mid-November, USS Enterprise joined in providing close air support to the Marines landing on Makin Island, from 19 to 21 November. On the night of November 26, 1943, the "Big E" introduced carrier-based night fighter operations in the Pacific when a three-plane team from the ship broke up a large group of land-based bombers attacking TG 50.2. After heavy strike by aircraft of TF 50 against Kwajalein on December 4, CV 6 returned to Pearl Harbor 6 days later. The carrier's next operation was with TF 58 in softening up the Marshall Islands and supporting the landings on Kwajalein, from January 29 to February 3, 1944. Then Enterprise sailed, still with TF 58, to strike the Japanese naval base at Truk in the Caroline Islands, on February 7th. Again the "Big E" made aviation history when she launched the first night radar bombing attack from any U.S. carrier. The 12 torpedo bombers in this strike achieved excellent results, accounting for nearly one-third of the 200,000 tons of shipping destroyed by the aircraft of the task force.

    Detached from TF 58, USS Enterprise launched raids on Jaluit Atoll on February 20, then steamed to Majuro and Espiritu Santo. Sailing March 15, 1944 in TG 36.1, she provided air cover and close support for the landings on Emirau Island (19-25 March). The carrier rejoined CF 58 on March 26 and for the next 12 days joined in the series of hard-hitting strikes against the Yap, Ulithi, Woleai, and the Palau Islands. After a week's rest and replenishment at Majuro, CV 6 sailed April 14th to support landings in the Hollandia area of few Guinea, and then hit Truk again (April 29-30).

    On June 6, 1944, the "Big E" and her companions of TG 58.3 sortied from Majuro to strike with the rest of TF 58, the Mariana Islands. Blasting Saipan, Rota, and Guam between June 11 and 14, USS Enterprise pilots gave direct support to the landings on Saipan on June 15, and covered the troops ashore for the next two days. Aware of a major Japanese attempt to break up the invasion of Saipan, Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander 6th Fleet, positioned TF 58 to meet the thrust. On June 19, 1944 took place the greatest carrier aircraft battle in history. For over eight hours airmen of the United States and Imperial Japanese navies fought in the skies over TF 58 and the Marianas. By the end of the day, a United States victory was apparent, and at the conclusion of the strikes against the Japanese fleet on June 20, the triumph became complete. Six American ships had been damaged, and 130 planes and a total of 76 pilots and aircrewmen had been lost. But with a major assist from U.S. submarines, 3 Japanese carriers were sunk, and 426 ship-based aircraft were destroyed. Japanese naval aviation never recovered from this blow.

    The Battle of the Philippine Sea over, USS Enterprise and her companions continued to support the Saipan campaign through July 5, 1944. The aircraft carrier then sailed for Pearl Harbor and a month of rest and overhaul. Back in action waters on August 24th, the ship sailed with TF 38 in that force's aerial assault on the Volcano and Bonin Islands from August 31 to September 2nd, and Yap, Ulithi, and the Palaus from September 6 to 8. After operating west of the Palau Islands, the "Big E" joined other units of TF 38 on October 7, and shaped course to the northward. From October 10 to 20th her aviators roared over Okinawa, Formosa, and the Philippines, blasting enemy airfields, shore installations, and shipping in preparation for the assault on Leyte. After supporting the Leyte landings on October 20, CV 6 headed for Ulithi to replenish but the approach of the Japanese fleet on October 23, brought her racing back into action. In the Battle for Leyte Gulf (October 23-26), Enterprise planes struck all three groups of enemy forces, battering battleships and destroyers before the action ended. The carrier remained on patrol east of Samar and Leyte until the end of October, then retired to Ulithi for supplies. During November, her aircraft struck targets in the Manila area, and the island of Yap. The "Big E" returned to Pearl Harbor on December 6, 1944.

    Sailing December 24th for the Philippine area, USS Enterprise carried on board an air group specially trained in night carrier operations. She joined TG 38.5 and swept the waters north of Luzon and of the China Sea during January of 1945, striking shore targets and shipping from Formosa to Indochina. After a brief visit to Ulithi, the "Big E" joined TG 58.5 on February 10, 1945 and provided day and night combat air patrol for TF 58 as it struck Tokyo on February 16 and 17th. She then supported the Marines on Iwo Jima from the day of the landings, February 19, 1945, until March 9 when she sailed for Ulithi. During one part of that period, Enterprise kept aircraft aloft continuously over Iwo Jima for 174 hours. Departing Ulithi March 15, the carrier continued her night work in raids against Kyushu, Honshu, and shipping in the Inland Sea of Japan. Damaged slightly by an enemy bomb on March 18, CV 6 entered Ulithi six days later for repairs. Back in action on April 5th, she supported the Okinawa operation until again damaged (April 11th), this time by a suicide plane, and forced back to Ulithi. Off Okinawa once more on May 6, 1945, USS Enterprise flew patrols around the clock as the menace of the kamikaze increased. On May 14, 1945, the "Big E" suffered her last wound of World War II when a suicide plane destroyed her forward elevator, killing 14 and wounding 34 men. The carrier sailed for repairs at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving June 7, 1945.

    Restored to peak condition, Enterprise voyaged to Pearl Harbor, returning to the States with some 1,100 servicemen due for discharge, then sailed on to New York, arriving October 17, 1945. Two weeks later she proceeded to Boston for installation of additional berthing facilities, then began a series of "Magic Carpet" voyages to Europe, bringing more than 10,000 veterans home in her final service to her country.

    USS Enterprise (CV 6) entered the New York Naval Shipyard on January 18, 1946 for inactivation, and was decommissioned on February 17, 1947. The "Big E" was sold on July 1, 1958.


    USS Enterprise Launched - History

    19,800 Tons (standard)
    25,500 Tons (full load)
    761' x 83' 2" x 25' 11" (built)
    827' 5" x 114' 2" x 25' 11"
    (As built)
    8 x 5"/38 cal guns
    4 x Quad 1.1" guns
    24 x .50 cal MG

    (October 1943)
    8 x 5"/38 cal guns
    8 x 2x40mm Bofors
    6 x 4x40mm Bofors
    50 x 20mm cannon

    (September 1945)
    8 x 5"/38 cal guns
    5 x 2x40mm Bofors
    11 x 4x40mm Bofors
    32 x 20mm cannons

    For her shakedown cruise, steamed southward to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. On December 21, 19438 placed under the command of Captain Charles A. Pownall. Operated off the east coast of the United States and Caribbean until April 1939. Assigned to the Pacific Fleet, Enterprise transited the Panama Canal to San Diego then proceeded to Pearl Harbor. On December 2, 1941, delivered F4F Wildcats for Marine Fighting Squadron 211 (VMF-211) to Wake Island Airfield then departed for Pearl Harbor.

    Pearl Harbor Attack
    On December 7, 1941 Enterprise was en route to Hawaii when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and Oahu. During the attack, Enterprise SBD Dauntless dive bombers arrived over Pearl Harbor and six were shot down by the Japanese including SBD Dauntless 2159. The carrier assembled her remaining aircraft in a search for the Japanese striking force, but failed to locate them. Afterwards, Enterprise entered Pearl Harbor for fuel and supplies and sailed early the next morning to patrol against any additional attacks on Hawaii.

    On December 10, 1941, Enterprise aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-70 in Hawaiian waters. During the last two weeks of December 1941, Enterprise and her group move west of Hawaii to cover those islands while two other carrier groups made a belated attempt to relieve Wake Island. After a brief layover at Pearl Harbor, the Enterprise group departed on January 11, 1942, to protect a convoy reinforcing Samoa.

    On January 16, 1942 Enterprise crossed the equator and launched TBD Devastator 0335 on a reconnaissance mission and ran out of fuel and ditched. The crew survived for 34 days at sea in their life raft before reaching Puka Puka Island.

    On February 1, 1942 assigned to Task Force 8 (TF-8) her carrier aircraft strike Kwajalein, Wotje, and Maloelap in the Marshall Islands, sinking three ships, damaging eight, and destroying numerous airplanes and ground facilities. Enterprise sustained minor damage from a Japanese counterattack then retires to Pearl Harbor for repairs.

    On February 24, 1942 assigned to Task Force 16 (TF-16) striking force under the command of Vice Admiral W. F. Halsey composed of USS Enterprise (CV-6) with cruiser and destroyer screening force launch planes to strike Wake and Marcus. Afterwards, returns to Pearl Harbor for minor alterations and repairs. On April 2, 1942 on a patrol mission off Oahu launches nine SBDs on a patrol mission. During a side over maneuver, SBD 2136 collides with SBD 2165 causing both planes to crash, the pilots managed to bail out and were rescued but the passengers went missing.

    On April 8, 1942, Enterprise departs Pearl Harbor to rendezvous with USS Hornet and steamed westward to launch 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers for the "Doolittle Raid" against Japan. On April 18, 1942 Enterprise fighters flew a combat air patrol (CAP) as the sixteen B-25 Mitchells of the "Doolittle Raid" take off. The task force was detected and after launching the B-25s and returns to Pearl Harbor on April 25, 1943.

    Five days later, sent to the South Pacific, missing the Battle of the Coral Sea. Ordered back to Hawaii, the carrier entered Pearl Harbor on May 26, and began intensive preparations to meet the expected Japanese attack at Midway.

    On May 28, 1942 Enterprise sortied as the flagship of Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, CTF-16, with orders "to hold Midway and inflict maximum damage on the enemy by strong attrition tactics." With Enterprise in TF 16 were Hornet, six cruisers, and 10 destroyers. On 30 May, TF 17, Rear Admiral Frank J. Fletcher in Yorktown, with two cruisers, and six destroyers, sailed to support TF 16 as senior officer, Rear Admiral Fletcher became "Officer in Tactical Command".

    Battle of Midway
    On June 4, 1942 during the Battle of Midway in the morning four Japanese carriers launched attacks on Midway Island. Three hours after the first bomb fell on Midway, planes from USS Hornet strike the enemy fleet and 30 minutes later carrier planes from Enterprise and Yorktown joined the attack bombing bomb Soryu and Akagi and contrubute to the sinking of three Japanese aircraft carriers for a decisive American victory. Without damage Enterprise returns to Pearl Harbor on June 13, 1942.

    South Pacific Service
    After a month of rest and overhaul, Enterprise departs July 15, 1942, for the South Pacific, where she joined TF 61 to support the amphibious landings on Tulagi and Guadalcanal on August 7, 1942. For the next two weeks, the carrier and her planes guarded seaborne communication lines southwest of the Solomons.

    Battle of the Eastern Solomons
    On August 24, 1942 a strong Japanese force was sighted some 200 miles north of Guadalcanal and TF 61 sent planes to the attack. During the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, she lost TBF Avenger 00418 (2 MIA, 1 rescued). The Japanese lost Ryūjō sunk and the Japanese transports with troops bound for Guadalcanal were forced back. During the battle, Enterprise suffered three direct hits and four near misses that inflicted heavy damage. Aboard, 74 were killed and 95 wounded.

    Despite the damage, her well-trained damage control parties patched her to steam for Pearl Harbor under her own power. Arriving September 10, 1942 at Pearl Harbor she underwent repairs until October 16, 1942 she departed bound for the South Pacific.

    Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands
    At the start of the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands on October 24, 1942 she joined USS Hornet CV-8 northwest of New Hebrides forming Task Force 16 (TF 16) USS Enterprise CV-6 under command of Rear Admiral Thomas Kinkaid with Task Force 17 (TF 17) USS Hornet CV-8 under command of Rear Admiral George Murray. The carriers were supported by USS South Dakota, three heavy cruisers: USS Portland CA-33, USS Northampton and USS Pensacola, three light cruisers USS San Juan, USS San Diego CL-53 and USS Juneau plus 14 destroyers.

    On October 26, 1942 Enterprise scout planes located a Japanese carrier force initiating the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands was underway. Enterprise aircraft struck carriers and cruisers during the struggle, while the "Big E" herself underwent intensive attack. Hit twice by bombs, Enterprise lost 44 killed and had 75 wounded.

    Despite serious damage, she continued in action and took on board a large number of planes from Hornet when that carrier was sunk. Though the American losses of a carrier and a destroyer were more severe than the Japanese loss of one light cruiser, the battle gained priceless time to reinforce Guadalcanal against the next enemy onslaught. Enterprise was now the only functioning US carrier in the Pacific Theater. On the flight deck, the crew posted a sign: "Enterprise vs Japan".

    Enterprise arrived at Nouméa on 30 October, for repairs, but a new Japanese thrust at the Solomons demanded her presence and she sailed on 11 November, repair crews from USS Vestal (AR-4) still working on board. On 13 November, aviators from Enterprise helped to dispatch the damaged battleship Hiei. When the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal ended on 15 November 1942, Enterprise had shared in sinking 16 ships and damaging eight more. The carrier returned to Nouméa on November 16, to complete her repairs, while VF-10 trained from Tontouta Airfield.

    Sailing again on December 4, 1942 Enterprise trained off Espiritu Santo until January 28, 1943, when she departed for the Solomon Islands.

    Battle of Rennell Island
    On January 30, 1943, her fighters flew combat air patrol for a cruiser-destroyer group during the Battle of Rennell Island and claimed seven bombers shot down, losing F4F Wildcat 11758. Despite the destruction of a large majority of the attacking Japanese bombers by Enterprise planes, USS Chicago was sunk.

    Afterwards, returned to Espiritu Santo on February 1, 1943 and operated in the vicinity for the next three months escorting U.S. vessels to the Solomons. Afterwards, Enterprise steamed to Pearl Harbor where, on 27 May 1943, Admiral Chester Nimitz presented the ship with the first Presidential Unit citation won by an aircraft carrier. On 20 July 1943, she entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a much-needed overhaul.

    While undergoing repairs in late 1942, Enterprise also received an extensive refit, which included an anti-torpedo blister that significantly improved her underwater protection.

    Back in action waters by mid-November, Enterprise joined in providing close air support to the Marines landing on Makin Atoll, from 19 November to 21 November 1943. On the night of 26 November, the "Big E" introduced carrier-based night fighter operations in the Pacific when a three-plane team from the ship broke up a large group of land-based bombers attacking TG 50.2. After a heavy strike by aircraft of TF 50 against Kwajalein on 4 December, Enterprise returned to Pearl Harbor five days later.

    The carrier's next operation was with Task Force 58 (TF 58) in softening up the Marshall Islands and supporting the landings on Kwajalein, from 29 January to 3 February 1944.

    Operation Hailstone Truk Lagoon
    On February 17, 1944 and February 18, 1944 during "Operation Hailstone" Enterprise carrier aircraft with Task Force 58 (TF-58) attack Japanese shipping and targets at Truk. Enterprise made aviation history, when she launched the first night radar bombing attack from an American carrier, launching twelve torpedo bombers in this strike achieved excellent results, accounting for nearly one-third of the 200,000 tons of shipping destroyed by aircraft.

    Afterwards, Enterprise detached from the main force of TF 58 escorted by one cruiser and six destroyers under the command of Rear Admiral J. W. Reeves and on February 20, 1944 launched two air strikes against Jaluit then to Majuro and Espiritu Santo.

    On March 15, 1944 joined Task Group 36.1 (TG 36.1) and during March 19-25, 1944 provided combat air patrols (CAP) and close air support for the landing at Emirau Island. The carrier rejoined TF 58 on 26 March, and for the next 12 days, joined in a series of strikes against the islands of Yap, Ulithi, Woleai, and Palau. After a week's rest and replenishment at Majuro, Enterprise sailed (14 April) to support landings at Hollandia in mid April 1944 and then hit Truk during April 29-30, 1944.

    On June 6, 1944, Enterprise and Task Group 58.3 (TG 58.3) sortied from Majuro to join the rest of TF 58 attacking the Marianas Islands. Between June 11-14, attacked targets on Saipan, Rota, and Guam and provided direct support to the landings on Saipan on June 15, and covered the troops ashore for the next two days. Aware of a major Japanese attempt to break up the invasion of Saipan, Admiral Spruance, now Commander 5th Fleet, positioned TF 58 to meet the threat.

    Battle of the Philippine Sea
    On June 19, 1944, the greatest carrier aircraft battle in history took place, the Battle of the Philippine Sea. For over eight hours, airmen of the United States and Imperial Japanese navies fought in the skies over TF 58 and the Marianas. By the end of the day, an American victory was apparent, and at the conclusion of the strikes against the Japanese fleet on 20 June, the triumph became complete. Six American ships were damaged, and 130 planes and a total of 76 pilots and aircrew lost. But with a major assist from U.S. submarines, three Japanese carriers: Hiyo, Shokaku and Taiho were sunk, and 426 ship-based aircraft were destroyed. Japanese naval aviation never recovered from this blow.

    The battle over, Enterprise and her companions continued to support the Saipan campaign through 5 July. She then sailed for Pearl Harbor and a month of rest and overhaul. Back in action waters on 24 August, the carrier sailed with TF 38 and flew strikes against the Volcano and Bonin Islands between August 31, 1944 until September 2, 1944 Next during September 6-8, 1944 flew missions against Yap, Ulithi, and Palau.

    Battle of Leyte Gulf
    After operating west of the Palau Islands, the Enterprise joined other units of TF 38 on 7 October and set course to the north. From October 10 to October 20, her aviators flew over Okinawa, Formosa, and the Philippines, blasting enemy airfields, shore installations, and shipping in preparation for the assault on Leyte. After supporting the Leyte landings on 20 October, Enterprise headed for Ulithi to replenish, but the approach of the Japanese fleet on October 23 brought her racing back into action.

    During the Battle of Leyte Gulf spanning October 23&ndash26, 1944, Enterprise planes struck all three groups of enemy forces, battering battleships and destroyers before the action ended. The carrier remained on patrol east of Samar and Leyte until the end of October, then retired to Ulithi for supplies. During November, her aircraft struck targets in the Manila area, and the island of Yap. She returned to Pearl Harbor on 6 December 1944.

    Iwo Jima, Okinawa
    Sailing 24 December for the Philippines, Enterprise carried on board an air group specially trained in night carrier operations. She joined TG 38.5 and swept the waters north of Luzon and of the China Sea during January of 1945, striking shore targets and shipping from Formosa to Indo-China. After a brief visit to Ulithi, the Enterprise joined TG 58.5 on 10 February 1945, and provided day and night combat air patrol for TF 58 as it struck Tokyo on February 16 and February 17.

    She then supported the Marines in the Battle of Iwo Jima from the day of the landings, 10 February, until 9 March when she sailed for Ulithi. During one part of that period, Enterprise kept aircraft aloft continuously over Iwo Jima for 174 hours.

    Departing Ulithi on March 15, the carrier continued her night work in raids against Kyushu, Honshu, and shipping in the Inland Sea off Japan. Damaged lightly by an enemy bomb on March 18, Enterprise returned to Ulithi six days later for repairs.

    Kamikaze Damage
    On April 5, 1945 arrived off Okinawa. On April 11, 1945 hit by a kamikaze and forced to withdraw to Ulithi for repairs. Returning to Okinawa on May 6, Enterprise aircraft flew patrols around the clock against kamikaze attacks.

    On May 14, 1945 a kamikaze fighter piloted by Lt. Shunsuke Tomiyasu of the 721 Kokutai, 306th Squadron crashed into the flight deck and destroyed the forward elevator, killing 14 and wounding 34 men. The ship's forward elevator was blown approximately 700' into the air from the force of the explosion six decks below. The carrier departed for repairs at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving June 7 and where she was still moored undergoing repairs on V-J Day, August 15 , 1945.

    For her World War II service, Enterprise earned 20 battle stars, the most for any U.S. warship in World War II. She also earned the Presidental Unit Citation (PUC). She was the only ship outside of the British Royal Navy to earn the highest award of the British Admiralty Pennant. Her planes and guns claimed 911 enemy planes her bombers sank 71 ships, and damaged or destroyed 192 more.

    Post War
    Repaired, Enterprise departed for Pearl Harbor then returning to the United States with 1,100 servicemen then departed via the Panama Canal to New York arriving October 17, 1945. Two weeks later, she proceeded to Boston for installation of additional berthing facilities.

    Enterprise began a series of "Operation Magic Carpet" voyages to Europe, bringing more than 10,000 veterans back to the United States. During one trip to Europe, the ship was awarded a British Admiralty Pennant, the only ship not in the Royal Navy to receive this honor.

    Enterprise entered the New York Naval Shipyard on January 18, 1946 for inactivation, and was decommissioned February 17, 1947. Although there were several attempts at preserving the ship as a museum / memorial, the fund raising efforts failed to raise enough money to buy the vessel from the Navy.

    On July 1, 1958 sold for scrap to the Lipsett Corporation of New York City for scrapping at Kearny, New Jersey. A promise was made to save the distinctive tripod mast for inclusion in the Naval Academy's new football stadium, but was never fulfilled (a memorial plaque was installed at the base of what is called "Enterprise Tower"). Scrapping was completed as of May 1960.

    Memorials
    In 1984, a permanent "Enterprise Exhibit" was dedicated at the National Museum of Naval Aviation to house artifacts, photos and other items of historical interest. Other surviving Enterprise artifacts include: the ship's bell, which resides at the U.S. Naval Academy, where it is traditionally rung only after midshipmen victories over West Point the sixteen foot, one-ton nameplate from the ship's stern, which sits near a Little League park in River Vale, New Jersey and one of the anchors, which is on display at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. Various other artifacts and mementos (including one of her portholes) are also kept aboard the current USS Enterprise.

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    Command crew

    Appearances

    References

    Background information

    Featured in a display (middle, rear) of several ships named Enterprise prior to 2364

    A sketch of the Enterprise-B

    In Star Trek Generations , the exterior of the Enterprise-B was a reuse of the USS Excelsior studio model designed by Bill George for Star Trek III: The Search for Spock . The miniature was given several modifications designed by John Eaves and Herman Zimmerman, including an extra set of impulse engines on the saucer section, flares on the side of the engineering hull, new caps on the front of the warp nacelles, and fins on the back of the nacelles. The blue accents on the ship were repainted to a teal color. The flares were added for the specific purpose of damaging them during the Nexus escape sequence and as a way to keep the Excelsior model beneath undamaged. The modifications were also by request of Producer Rick Berman, who felt the Excelsior design had been overused in the previous motion pictures and in the television series. The NCC-1701-B was also rendered as a CGI model for certain sequences within the Nexus. As it turned out, the glue used to attach the additional parts did in fact damage the original model, so the modifications were never removed. The physical model was later relabeled to become the USS Lakota in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine fourth season episode " Paradise Lost ". ( citation needed • edit)

    The bridge was a redress of the USS Enterprise-A bridge from Star Trek V: The Final Frontier , which was also seen as the Amargosa observatory in Star Trek Generations. The sickbay was the drydock observation area seen earlier in the film, while deflector control was a new set. ( citation needed • edit)

    The Enterprise-B was established as an Excelsior-class ship during the first season of Star Trek: The Next Generation, when a series of relief sculptures depicting the history of the Enterprise name was added to the Enterprise-D conference lounge set. They were present for the first four years of the series and a flashback during TNG : " All Good Things. ". The sculpture used represented the original Excelsior design. However, models in the lounge of the Enterprise-E in Star Trek: First Contact and Star Trek Nemesis more accurately showed the Enterprise-B as it is depicted in Generations. Furthermore, the Enterprise-C sculpture also differed from the final Ambassador-class design, meaning the sculptures were probably meant to be abstract.

    Actor James Doohan once commented about the Enterprise-B, "It looks absolutely fabulous." ("Uniting Two Legends", Star Trek Generations (Special Edition) DVD/Blu-ray)

    The model of the Enterprise-B (Lot #998) was sold at the 40 Years of Star Trek: The Collection auction on October 7, 2006 for US$132,000 including the buyer's premium (the winning bid was US$110,000). The model is now part of ScienceFictionArchives.com collections. [1]

    A box of video tapes of the computer graphics, including RADAR and subspace scan, aboard the Enterprise-B during its red alert was sold off on the It's A Wrap! sale and auction on eBay. [2]

    According to the Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual, the Enterprise-B was involved in exploration beyond the Gourami sector, charting 142 star systems and making first contact with seventeen new civilizations prior to her decommissioning.

    Apocrypha

    The USS Enterprise-D cut-away poster listed a Captain "Thomas Johnson Jr. ( β )" for the Enterprise-B. The USS Enterprise Owners' Workshop Manual established that "Thomas Johnson, Jr." was the ship's final captain serving from the early 2320s through the ship's loss in 2329. This source also claims that a new captain, William George ( β ) – a nod to ILM visual effects staffer Bill George – was assigned alongside several other officers, but this is not referenced in any other source.

    The Enterprise-B's dedication plaque in memory of Kirk

    In the first issue of the IDW Publishing comic Star Trek: Spock: Reflections, Spock visited the Enterprise-B a year after its launch where Harriman showed him a memorial plaque dedicated to Kirk he had installed on the ship after it left spacedock for repairs in the section of the ship where Kirk was at the time believed to be killed. Although Harriman knew it wasn't regulation, he felt it was the right thing to do.


    Watch the video: The History of: the USS Enterprise CVN-65