Edward Masterson

Edward Masterson


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Edward Masterson was born in Henryville, Ontario, on 22nd September, 1852. His family moved to Wichita in 1869 and three years later Edward and his two brothers, Bat Masterson and James Masterson, became buffalo hunters.

Masterson became a assistant marshal in Dodge City in July 1877. Later that year he was shot in the chest by Bob Shaw in the Lone Star Dance Hall. When he recovered he replaced Larry Deger as city marshall.

On 15th March, 1878, Masterson joined with Charles Bassett and Bat Masterson, the sheriff of Ford County, to capture two train robbers. Later that month Masterson announced a new scheme where vagrants found in Dodge City would be put to work.

On 9th April, 1878, Edward Masterson was shot while trying to disarm a drunken cowboy. He died soon afterwards. Jack Wagner, the man who shot him, died the next day.

Last Monday afternoon one of those little episodes which serve to vary the monotony of frontier existence occurred at the Lone Star dance hall, during which four men came out some the worse for wear; but none, with one exception, being seriously hurt.

Bob Shaw, the man who started the amusement, accused Texas Dick alias Moore of having robbed him of forty dollars, and when the two met in the Lone Star the ball was opened.

Somebody, foreseeing possible trouble, and probable gore, started out in search of Assistant City Marshal Ed. Masterson, and finding him hurried the officer to the scene of the impending conflict.

When Masterson entered the door he descried Shaw by the bar with a huge pistol in his hand and a hogshead of blood in his eye, ready to relieve Texas Dick of his existence in this world and send him to those shades where troubles come not and six shooters are not known.

Not wishing to hurt Shaw, but anxious to quiet matters and quell the disturbance officer Masterson first ordered him to give up his gun. Shaw refused to deliver and told Masterson to keep away from him, and after saying this he again proceeded to try to kill Texas Dick. Officer Masterson then gently tapped the belligerent Shaw upon the back of the head with the butt of his shooting iron, merely to convince him of the vanities of this frail world and to teach him that all isn't lovely even when the goose does hang antitudilum. The aforesaid reminder upon the back of the head, however failed to have the desired effect, and instead of dropping, as any man of fine sensibilities would have done, Shaw turned his battery upon the officer and let him have it in the right breast, the ball striking a rib and passing around came out under the right shoulder blade, paralyzing his right arm so that it was useless, so far as handling a pistol was concerned. Masterson fell but grasping his pistol in his left had he returned the fire giving it to Shaw in the left arm and the left leg, rendering him hors du combat.

During the melee Texas Dick was shot in the right groin, making a painful and dangerous though not necessarily a fatal wound, while Frank Buskirk who, impelled by a curiosity he could not control, was looking in at the door upon the matinee, received a reminiscence in the left arm, which had the effect of starting him out to hunt a surgeon. Nobody was killed, but for a time it looked as though the undertaker and the coroner would have something to do. The nerve and pluck displayed by officer Masterson reflects credit both upon himself and the city, which has reason to congratulate itself upon the fact that it has a guardian who shirks no responsibility and who hesitates not to place himself in danger when duty requires.

City Marshal Edward Masterson receives the congratulations of his many friends without a show of exhalation. Notwithstanding the fact that considerable feeling was manifested against the removal of Mr. Deger, no one accuses Mr. Masterson of seeking the position. In fact he preferred to retain his old position as Assistant, which gave him the same salary and engendered less responsibilities. As an officer his reputation is made, and it is a good one.

City Marshal Masterson contemplates organizing a tramp brigade for the purpose of clearing the streets and alleys of the filth and rubbish that has been accumulating for a year or so. There are about thirty tramps now sojourning among us, all of whom have no visible means of support and are liable to arrest under the vagrant act.

At ten o'clock last night. City Marshal Edward Masterson, discovered that a cowboy who was working for Obum of Kansas City, named Jack Wagner, was carrying a six-shooter contrary to the City Ordinance. Wagner was at the time under the influence of liquor, but quietly gave up the pistol. The Marshal gave it to some of Wagner's friends for safe keeping and stepped out into the street. No sooner had he done so than Wagner ran out after him pulling another pistol, which the Marshal had not observed. The Marshal saw him coming and turned upon Wagner and grabbed hold of him.

Wagner shot Marshal Masterson at once through the abdomen, being so close to him that the discharge set the Marshal's clothes on fire. Marshal Masterson then shot Wagner.

About this time a man named Walker got mixed up in the fight. He, it appears, was boss herder for Obum, and Wagner was working under him. He also got shot once through the left lung, and his right arm was twice broken.

Marshal Masterson walked across the street to George M. Hoover's saloon, where after telling that he was shot, he sank to the floor. He was immediately removed to his room, where in half an hour he expired.

Walker and Wagner were nearly all night insensible, and none thought that either of them could live through the night. However, morning has come and neither are dead; both are in a very precarious condition and their chances for recovery very small.

The city is in mourning; every door is draped with crape; business is entirely suspended till after the funeral of Marshal Masterson, which will take place at two o'clock p. m., and will be attended by everybody in the city.

Marshal Masterson will be buried in the Military Cemetery, at Fort Dodge.

Died. In this city, on Tuesday, April 9th, in the 26th year of his age, Edward J. Masterson, City Marshal.

The subject of this sketch was born in Henryville, Canada East, on September 22d, 1852, and removed to Wichita, Kansas with his parents in 1869, where he continued to reside until attaining his majority when he left his home and became one of the first inhabitants of this city.

In June 5, 1877 he accepted the appointment of Assistant Marshal, and in the December, 1877, having displayed marked adaptability for the position, he was promoted to the Marshalship, in the discharge of the duties of which he continued until his unfortunate death.

Possessed of a geniality of temperament, a kindness of heart and a richness of personal bravery, he had many warm friends and admirers.

As an officer he followed the dictation of duty, striving at all times for its honest and complete discharge and gaming for himself the dignity and respect that of necessity followed from his determined intrepidity.

He died in the service he performed so well, and has added one other to the list of those who, living, were so many representatives, each of his day and generation, but who dead, belong to all time, and whose voices ring down the ages in solemn protest against the reign of violence and blood.


Edward J. Masterson

Lawman. 1852 - 1878

The brother of Bat Masterson, Edward was the oldest of the seven Masterson children. Born in Canada East in 1852, he and his other brother, Jim, both served as marshals of Dodge City in the late 1870s. While performing his official duties on the evening of April 9, 1878, Ed was shot and killed by two drunken cowboys from Hays. Before he collapsed, he fatally shot one of his attackers and seriously wounded the other.

Entry: Masterson, Edward J.

Author: Kansas Historical Society

Author information: The Kansas Historical Society is a state agency charged with actively safeguarding and sharing the state's history.

Date Created: February 2011

Date Modified: March 2011

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Edward Masterson - History

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1. EDWARD1 MASTERSON was born Abt. 17061, and died Abt. 1754 in Fairfax Co., VA. He married MARY2 Unknown in VA. She was born Bef. 1710, and died Aft. 1768.

Notes for EDWARD MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY

) NOTES: Gave age as 40 years in 1746 deposition, Pr. William Co., VA. 1751 - Applied to Fairfax Co., VA Court for permission to build mill on Difficult Run.

PROBATE - HEIRS: Will and Probate of Edward Masterson 1754 Co. Clerk, Fairfax Co., VA, will dtd 5 July 1754, presented 18 Sep 1754. Will Book B-1 pp 69-71 photocopy in possession of Regina Barry, Wilmington, DE. He refers to himself as a "millwright".

BIOGRAPHY: The earliest record for Edward Masterson is his purchase of 150 acres of land in Essex Co., VA on 19 Nov 1728. He sold the same land in 1735, but he called himself 'of the County of Caroline'. Edward Masterson was a millwright, and a grinder of grains by trade, and he leased 300 acres of land on Four Mile Run in Fairfax Co., VA in 1745. The mill was located where Doctors' Creek merged with Four Mile Run, but the creek is now filled in. On Sept 25, 1751, Edward Masterson petitioned the Fairfax Co. court for permission to build a grist mill on Difficult Run. He wrote his will on 25 July 1754, and called himself a millwright. It was presented to the court 18 Sep 1754 by his wife Mary and son Edward. In it, he names his 9 children.

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ruth and Sam Sparacio. Deed Abstracts of Fairfax County, Virginia 1742-1750. McLean, VA. 1986. Privately published.. Pg 49. LDS Family History Library. 975.5291 R2s v.1.

LIVING: (original page 480-483) 15 Oct 1745. Thomas Whitford of Fairfax County to Edward Masterson of the same. 3 acres and a quarter.

Ruth & Sam Sparacio. Deed Abstracts of Fairfax County, Virginia 1750-1761. McLean, VA. 1986. Privately published.. LDS Family History Library. US/CAN 975.5292 R2s V.2.

LIVING: Pg 10 (original page 92-93) 27 Sep 1750. Indenture between Christopher Neale of Fairfax County & Edward Masterson of the same - four 8 pounds current money eight acres of land on Difficult Run. Recorded 27 Sep 1750.

LIVING: Pg 40 (original page 354). Court of Fairfax County held 25 Sep 1751. On the petition of Edward Masterson to erect a water grist on Difficult Run and to have an acre of land confirmed to him. Ordered that Sheriff summon twelve freeholders to meet upon the land petitioned for by Edward Masterson. We the subscribers met on the land petitioned for by Edward Masterson.. do value the said land and damage that may be sustained by such mill to Thirty Schillings on the side of the run the acre is laid off and thirty on the other. 20 July 1752.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Geneology Room.

Notes for MARY:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

AGE: She was probably 20 before she married.

RESEARCH: Several researchers have suggested her maiden name was Lindsey.
RESEARCH: Will of Benjamin Sebastian 30 Sep 1770 Fairfax Co., VA Will Book C No 1 1767-76 Pg 95-96 LDS Microfilm 0031284 NOTE: This will was witnessed by a 'Mordock McPherson' - one of the few McPhersons references in the Fairfax Co., Va at this time.

BIOGRAPHY: Mary and Edward Masterson were probably married prior to 1730, as their son Edward was old enough to serve as an executor of his fathers' will in 1754. After Edwards' death, Mary re-married Mark McPherson, and eventually sold her share of 400 acres in Prince William Co., Va to her son John Masterson.

OTHER MARRIAGES: Mark McPherson (MRIN:268)
Married after 1754 Fairfax Co., VA.

SOURCES: Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.

Children of EDWARD MASTERSON and MARY are:

2. i. EDWARD2 MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1730, VA d. Bef. 1788, Wayne Co., NC.
ii. SARAH MASTERSON, b. Aft. 1736, Fairfax Co., VA d. Aft. 1801, Alexandria Co., VA.

Notes for SARAH MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):
Sarah Masterson-458

LIVING-RESIDENCE: Will of Ann Mason 9 Aug 1761 Fairfax Co., VA Will Book B No 1 1752-67 pg 299ff LDS microfilm 0031284 NOTE: Ann Mason left money and other goods to 'orphans' living with her, naming only relatives living in England. ' To Sarah Masterson 5 pounds with one-half of my wearing apparel.
PROBATE: Will of Sarah Masterson 7 Aug 1801 Alexandria Co., Court, Will Book A pp160-161 NOTE: Proved 12 July 1803.
BIOGRAPHY: Sarah Masterson was one of the 'young children' in her father Edwards' will. She does not appear in records for the area, and does not appear to have been married. Her will, made in 1801, states that she is of the 'town of Alexandria in the District of Columbia ' and refers to an indenture made by William Ramsay 8 Jan 1785 from which she has derived 16 pounds yearly as rent. (I have not examined the indenture-and probably should). She wills the rent money to James Montgomery Stewert, a son of Betty Stewert, daughter of the said William Ramsay.
SOURCES:>br> LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress-Local History & Genealogy Room.

3. iii. MARY MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1740, Fairfax Co., VA d. Aft. 1768, Halifax Co., NC.
iv. ELIZABETH MASTERSON, b. Abt. 1740, Fairfax Co., VA d. Abt. 1822 m. JOSEPH FARROW, Bef. 1754 b. Unknown d. 1784, Loudon Co., VA.

Notes for ELIZABETH MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):
Elizabeth Masterson-459

NOTES:
BIOGRAPHY: Elizabeth is one of the children named as 'younger child' in the will of Edward Masterson, 1754. She was about 10 years old when her father died. She married Joseph Farrow, who was a "Waggoner" in the Revolutionary War. Joseph Farrow, died abt 1784 in Loudon Co., VA and Elizabeth moved to KY with her children, and lived with her son Joseph in Mason Co., KY until her death in 1822. Her tombstone reads: "Her languishing head is at rest, It's thinking and aching are o'er. Her quiet immovable breast is heaved by affliction no more. Her heart is no longer the seat of trouble and tormenting pain. It ceases to flutter and beat. It will never flutter again."

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children & Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

v. JOHN MASTERSON, b. Abt. 1747, Fairfax Co., VA d. Abt. 1806, Westmoreland Co., PA m. SARAH TOBIN, Bef. 1768 b. Unknown d. Unknown.

Notes for JOHN MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

DEATH: Will written 27 June 1781/proved 2 Aug 1782 Westmoreland Co., PA. Will Vol 1 WB p 81. File 28. Sale 3B Pn 86.
BIOGRAPHY: John Masterson was described as a 'younger child' in his fathers' will in 1754 he would have been abt 8. He was 21 by 1768, when he was 'of Loudon Co., schoolmaster' and bought 418 acres in Prince William Co., VA from his mother. By 1773, john Masterson and his wife Sarah Tobin moved to the Western part of Pennsylvania and is on the 1773 tax list for Springhill Twn, Bedford CO., PA. John wrote his will 27 Jun 1781, and it was brought to court 2 Aug 1782, and he mentions an unborn child in his will. His widow Sarah continued to live on the same land, paying taxes in 1783 in Westmoreland Co., PA and in 1785 in Fayette Co., PA (as new counties were carved out of the old, larger counties.)

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.

vi. RICHARD MASTERSON, b. December 31, 1752, Fairfax Co., VA d. Abt. 1806, Gallatin Co., KY m. SARAH SHORES, Unknown b. Unknown d. Unknown.

Notes for RICHARD MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)
BIOGRAPHY: Ricahrd was an infant when his father died, born 31 Dec 1752. He was a surveyor, and moved to KY very early to survey Mason and Lewis Co. in 1775. He and nine other young men built cabins and dead ended trees, fulfilling the legal requirements to claim the land. Richard returned the following year and claimed land for himself, His brothers John and Thomas and his brother-in-law Joseph Farrow. These claims were made in the Harrodsburg KY court in 1780. Richard served as a Revolutionary War soldier on the Romney and Winchester payrolls (Grant and Hardy Co., WVA) in the mid 1780's, he moved to Lexington and founded Mastersons' Station which was the site of the first Methodist Church in KY in 1788. He and his family moved to Gallatin Co., KY in 1972 and Richard died there in 1806.

SOURCES:
LIFE: Michael L. Cook & Bettie Cummings Cook. Fayette County Kentucky Records Vol 4. Evansville, Ind. 1985. Cook publications. Pg 73 (original page 202). LDS Family History Library. US/CAN 976.947 P2c V. 4.

LAND: 8 Oct 1804 Commissioners to meet on the entry of Richard Masterson on November 3rd next to take depositions respecting Warrant No 19,465 to be laid off twice as long as wide being on the Hunters Trace leading from Bryants Station and waters of Hingston on the dividing ridge between Hingston and Elkhorn.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.
vii. WILLIAM MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1754, Fairfax Co., VA d. Unknown, Halifax Co., NC.

Notes for WILLIAM MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

BIOGRAPHY: Willaim Masterson was imprisoned in Halifax, NC in 1754, and his share of his fathers' estate was to be paid upon his release. (Fairfax Co., VA Will Book, Bl, Pg 69-71). He was probably the William Masterson who bought 400 acres in Frederick Co., VA in 1762, and appears on the Romney Payroll, 1775. He may be the aged William Masterson on the 1810 Census in Augusta Co., VA and 1820 in Monogelia Co., VA.

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.
viii. ROBERT MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1754, Fairfax Co., VA d. Aft. 1754.

Notes for ROBERT MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

LIVING: He is named in his fathers' will as living in 1754.

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.
ix. THOMAS MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1754, Fairfax Co., VA d. Abt. 1791, Pr. George Co., VA m. LUCY HARDAWAY, Unknown, VA b. Unknown d. Unknown.

Notes for THOMAS MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY

) BIOGRAPHY: Thomas Masterson was very young when his father died. He was placed under the guardianship of his brother-in-law, Joseph Farrow who apprenticed to Thomas Masterson to Thomas Dagg, ship carpenter, ion 1766. By 1774-76, he had bought and sold land in Prince William Co., VA. At the start of the Revolutionary War, he owed money to some business firm in England - he is listed in 'British Mercantile Claims' as 'Thomas Masterson, of Prince William Co., Va, due Sept 1776. Lives in Petersburg, solvent'. He is probably the 'Thomas Masterson, ensign' who served on the ship Tempest in 1778. Thomas Masterson living in Prince George Co., VA in 1782-87 tax lists. He may have died shortly after the tax list was made, as another British Mercantile claim of 1803 states "Thomas Masterson, of Loudon Co., due 29 July 1776. Died insolvent abt 12 years ago'. Thomas Mastersons' wife, Lucy Hardaway and his daughter petitioned for power of attorney to sell the land he had owned in Gallatin KY in 1816 when they were living in Dinwiddle Co., VA.

SOURCES:
LIFE:
Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Geneology Room.

BIRTH: Ruth and Sam Sparacio. Deed Abstracts of Prince William County, Virginia 1767-1771. McLean, VA 1990. The Antient Press. Pg 52-53. LDS Family History Library - Local History and Genealogy Room.

LIVING: (original page 45-47). Indenture made 30th December 1767 between Mark McPherson of Dettingen Parish, Prince William County VA, planter John Masterson of Loudon in VA, schoolmaster. Proved in court 6 Feb 1769 by oath of Thomas Masterson, one of the witnesses.

2. EDWARD2 MASTERSON (EDWARD1)2 was born Bef. 1730 in VA, and died Bef. 1788 in Wayne Co., NC. He married MARY COLEMAN Bef. 1752 in Fairfax Co., VA. She was born Unknown, and died Unknown.

Notes for EDWARD MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

LIVING RESIDENCE: Will of Robert Preston 9 April 1757 Fairfax Co., VA Will Book B No 1 1752 - 67 pg 175ff, 198-200 LDS Microfilm 0031284
NOTE: Edward Masterson was one of the witnesses and sworn in court to the Will of Robert Preston. Edward Masterson also returned an appraisal of the estate of Mr. John Trammel 19 Dec 1758.
Biography: Edward Masterson was a trooper in the French & Indian War, 1755-1756, when he served with the Fairfax Co., VA militia. He was listed in the "House of Delegates Journal" 1777-1780 as having gone in defense of people in outlying VA. There are a series of three land patents, issued in 1768 and 1770, for Edward Masterson to acquire 1100 acres of land in Dobbs Co., NC. He moved to Johnston Co., NC before 1777 and served as a lieutenant in the militia there. Court-martial papers were issued for him in Johnston Co., NC in 1777 and he was supoen'ed to court in Oct 1787 in Dobbs Co., NC: but the subpoena was returned to the January Court by the sheriff - 'not to be found'. Edward Masterson probably died in Wayne Co., NC before 12 Jan 1788, when the estate of Edward Masterson, dec'd was attached for court costs and on 20 April 1790 a court order in Wayne Co., NC was issued for the distribution of his estate. He had 11 children, and may have been married twice (from the large age differences in his family). Edward Masterson inherited a negro called 'Tom' from his father Edward in 1754. In the inventory of the estate of Edward of NC, the first negro is 'Tom".

PROBATE-HEIRS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson: 1789-1790 Wayne Co., NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff, 164ff photocopy in possession Regina M. Barry, Wilmington DE. No wife is named in his estate. His estate included 2 bottles of Gin & rum (0-7-6), a gun & shot bag (3-10-0), a Large Bible (2-11-0) and a looking glass (1-12-6), with a total value of 121-1-0. The negroes of the estate of Edward Masterson included Tom (value L140), London (value L140), Ryall (value L140), Rachael (value L80), Patience (value L80), Hanna (value L60), Sarah (value L60), young Sarah (value L20) and Lettice (value L20), They were hired out for 1 year to work for the estate at 41-15-0 and hired out from 15 Jan 1790-12 April 1790 for 15-13-6. They were then sold. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craig, Caleb, Lenny, McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Delle, William. Lazarus, and Jane.

Sources:
LIFE:
Ruth & Sam Sparacio. Deed of Abstracts of Fairfax County, Virgina 1750-1761. McLean, VA. 1986. Privately published.. LDS Family History Library. US/CAN 975.5291 R2s v.2.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His children and Grandchildren. Masterson's Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55,66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

Notes for MARY COLEMAN:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

LIVING-RELATIONSHIP: Will and Probate of Richard Coleman 1763-64 Co. Clerk, Loudon Co., VA Wills. will dtd Oct 1763 pp 98-99 photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. 'daughter Mary Masterson'

Death - Probate - Heirs: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp139ff, 164ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington DE. No wife named in his estate, implying she was dead by this time.

MARRIAGES: Ruth & Sam Sparacio. Deed Abstract of Prince William county, Virginia 1767-1771. McLean, VA. 1990 The Antient Press. Pg 52-53. LDS Family History Library.

LIVING: (original page 45-47). Indenture made 30th December 1767 between Mark McPherson of Dettingen Parish, Prince William County VA, planter & John Masterson of Loundoun in VA, schoolmaster. Mark McPherson and wife Mary for 15 pounds current money grant to John Masterson & his heirs during the term of Mary McPhersons' natural life 418 acres in the parish of Dettingen ( on Quanticoe Creek). The same land being granted to John Farrow, deceas'd father to Abraham Farrow then to Edward Masterson, Mary McPhersons' deceased husband. Proved in court 6 Feb 1769 by oath of Thomas Masterson, one of the witnesses.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren, Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg. 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

Children of EDWARD MASTERSON and MARY COLEMAN are:

4. i. JAMES3 MASTERSON, b. April 07, 1752, Fairfax Co., VA d. December 15, 1838.
ii. CALEB MASTERSON, b. Abt. 1758 d. Unknown.

Notes for CALEB MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

LIVING-RELATIONSHIP: "Fayette Co KY Circuit Court Records" THE REGISTER OF KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Vol 32 No (1934) pg 20 Morris Library, University of Delaware, Newark DE. NOTE: Deposition of Caleb Masterson, aged 48 taken 23 May 1806. He came to KY in 1779 and made Lexington his home ever since. He helped bury the dead after the defeat at the Battle of Blue Licks in 1782. He worked as a spy in 1780, traveling frequently as a hunter and made his living from it.

MARRIAGE: Wife's name may have been Jenny or Peggy.

BIOGRAPHY: Caleb Masterson was an early settler in Lexington, arriving in KY some six months before his brother James. Before that, he had also served in the militia in Johnston Co. NC (as had his father Edward Masterson) and was fined for missing a muster in 1777.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

iii. MARY MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1765 d. Unknown.

Notes for MARY MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

MARRIAGE: Kentucky marriage Records.

BIRTH - DEATH: She was probably in her teens before her marriage to Samuel Craig in 1781: and was living at the time of her fathers' estate division in 1790.

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

NOTE: Lincoln Co. KY estates Book B, p 268 - Samuel Craig 9 July 1804. This should be checked to see if it has any info abt Mary.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

iv. WINNIFED MASTERSON, b. Abt. 1773 d. Unknown.

Notes for WINNIFED MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

MARRIAGE: Lincoln Co., KY marriages.

MARRIAGE - LIVING - RELATIONSHIP: Guardianship account of James Masterson for four heirs of Edward Masterson, deceased, of North Carolina, April 1804 1794-1804: Levi Todd, Co. Clerk, Fayette Co. KY Will Book A, pp 172-3: photocopy in possession of Regina Barry. NOTE: Her share was paid 17 May 1794.

BIOGRAPHY: Winny Masterson was one of the four youngest children of Edward Masterson, who was placed under the care of her brother, James Masterson. In such cases, it would have been normal for her share of the estate of her father to be paid at the age 21 (for men) or at marriage (for women). She received her share 17 May 1794 But signed the receipt herself, indicating she was still unmarried. She was probably 21 close to that date.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

v. LEAH MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1775 d. Unknown.

Notes for LEAH MASTERSON:
BIRTH: She was probably in her teens at marriage, and she married before her fathers' estate division in 1790.
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

MARRIAGE: Lincoln Co., KY marriage records.
LIVING: Leah Masterson issued power of attorney to James Masterson of Lexington KY in July 1790.

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55. 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Genealogy Room.

vi. SARAH MASTERSON, b. Bef. 1775 d. Unknown.

Notes for SARAH MASTERSON:
BIRTH: She was old enough to manager her affairs, i. e. she was not made a ward of James Masterson in 1790.
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

BIRTH: She was probably in her teens before her marriage in 1790.

MARRIAGE: Lincoln Co., KY marriages.

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55. 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Genealogy Room.

vii. LEANNAH MASTERSON, b. Abt. 1775 d. Unknown.

Notes for LEANNAH MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

BIRTH: She was probably in her teens before her marriage in 1790.

MARRIAGE: Lincoln Co., KY marriages.

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny,McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55. 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Geneology Room.

viii. DELILAH MASTERSON, b. November 27, 1775 d. Unknown.

Notes for DELILAH MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

BIRTH - DEATH : Tombstone, Wymore-Downing cemetery, outside Lexington, KY. (Birth date also given on stone). 'Delilah Wymore'.

MARRIAGE - LIVING - RELATIONSHIP: Guardianship account of James Masterson for four heirs of Edward Masterson, deceased, of North Carolina, April 1804 1794-1804: Levi Todd, Co. Clerk, Fayette Co. KY. First payment May 17, 1794, last payment Mar 1804 Fayette Co., KY Will Book A, pp 172-3 photocopy in possession of Regina Barry.

BIOGRAPHY: Delilah Masterson was one of the four youngest children of Edward Masterson, who was placed under the care of her elder brother, James Masterson. In such cases, it would have been normal for her share of the estate of her father to be paid at age 21 (for men) or at marriage (for women). Her husband Martin Wymore signed a receipt for her portion of her fathers' estate May 1794, probably after their marriage.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Geneology Room.

BIRTH - SPOUSE - DEATH - NOTE: This gives her death date as 18 Dec 1841.

ix. WILLIAM MASTERSON, b. April 05, 1778 d. Unknown.

Notes for WILLIAM MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

: FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

MARRIAGE: Lincoln Co., KY marriage records.

DEATH: Tombstone, Pulaski, Lincoln Co., KY.

MARRIAGE - LIVING - RELATIONSHIP: Guardianship account of James Masterson for four heirs of Edward Masterson, deceased, of North Carolina, April 1804 1794-1804 Levi Todd, Co. Clerk, Fayette Co., KY first payment May 17, 1794, last payment 1 Mar 1804 Fayette Co., KY Will Book A, pp172-3 photocopy in possession of Regina Barry.

BIOGRAPHY: William Masterson was one of the four youngest children of Edward Masterson, who was placed under the care of his elder brother, James Masterson. In such cases it would have been normal for his share of the estate of his father to be paid at the age of 21 ( for men ) or at marriage ( for women ). William Masterson received his share of the estate Dec (?) 5, 1799, probably shortly after his 21st birthday.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55. 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History and Genealogy Room.

x. JANE MASTERSON, b. Aft. 1782 d. Unknown.

Notes for JANE MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

BIRTH - SPOUSE - BIOGRAPHY - CHILDREN: "EDWARD MASTERSON. His Children and Grandchildren" 1706-1820 MASTERSON FAMILY NEWSLETTER, Vol 2, No 4 and Vol 3, No 1 (Winter 1988/89 and Spring 1989) pp55, 66-67. possession of Regina Barry. Also at Library of Congress, Washington DC.

BIRTH: She is named after Lazarus, whose birth date is unknown and was probably younger.

LIVING: Settlement of fathers' estate, Orphan's Court, Wayne Co., NC July 1790.

xi. LAZARUS MASTERSON, b. February 22, 1782 d. Unknown.

Notes for LAZARUS MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

BIRTH - SPOUSE - BIOGRAPHY - CHILDREN: "EDWARD MASTERSON. His Children and Grandchildren" 1706-1820 MASTERSON FAMILY NEWSLETTER, Vol 2, No 4 and Vol 3, No 1 (Winter 1988/89 and Spring 1989) pp55, 66-67. possession of Regina Barry. Also at Library of Congress, Washington DC.

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

MARRIAGE - LIVING - RELATIONSHIP: Guardianship account of James Masterson for four heirs of Edward Masterson, deceased, of North Carolina, April 1804 1794-1804 Levi Todd, Co. Clerk, Fayette Co., KY first payment May 17, 1794, last payment 1 Mar 1804 Fayette Co., KY Will Book A, pp172-3 photocopy in possession of Regina Barry.

BIOGRAPHY: Lawrence/Lazarus Masterson was one of the four youngest children of Edward Masterson, who was placed under the care of his elder brother, James Masterson. In such cases, it would have been normal for his share of the estate of his father to be paid at the age of 21 (for men) or at marriage (for women). Lazarus Masterson received his share of the estate 1 Mar 1804, probably after his 21st birthday.

. 3. MARY2 MASTERSON (EDWARD1) was born Bef. 1740 in Fairfax Co., VA, and died Aft. 1768 in Halifax Co., NC. She married JOHN LINDSAY Bef. 1754.

Notes for MARY MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

NOTES: MARRIAGES: Named as 'dau Mary Lindsey' in fathers' will (1754).

DEATH: Her youngest son, John Lindsay, was born 30 May 1768.

BIOGRAPHY: Mary was married to John Lindsay before her fathers' death in 1754. He was the son of James and Sarah (Daniel) Lindsay of Caroline Co., VA. Mary and John moved to Halifax Co., NC. John Lindsay died there 1826, aged 97/98.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children & Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

Child of MARY MASTERSON and JOHN LINDSAY is:

i. JOHN3 LINDSAY, b. May 30, 1768 d. Unknown.

4. JAMES3 MASTERSON (EDWARD2, EDWARD1)2 was born April 07, 1752 in Fairfax Co., VA, and died December 15, 1838. He married MARGARET WYMORE2 1781 in Fayette Co., KY, daughter of THOMAS OR JACOB WYMORE. She was born Abt. 1766, and died Bef. April 25, 1844 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for JAMES MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

FATHER-SIBLINGS: Division of the Estate of Edward Masterson 1789-1790 Wayne Co. NC Court Records, July Court 1789, Jan Court 1790, April Court 1790 pp 139ff photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington, DE. No wife is named in his estate. Each heir received 77-6-9, and are named in the order James, Mary, Craige, Caleb, Lenny McCormack, Leah, Sarah, Winnifred, Dellie, William, Lazarus and Jane.

LIVING-RELATIONSHIP: "Fayette Co KY Circuit Court Records" THE REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Vol 32 No (1934) pg 265 Morris Library, University of Delaware, Newark DE. NOTE: Deposition of James Masterson, taken 24 June 1816. He came to KY in June 1779, then returned in the fall. He testifies he knew most settlers in Harrodsburg & Lexington at that time.

MARRIAGE: Application of Margaret Masterson for a widows' pension.

BIRTH-DEATH: Application for Revolutionary War Pension. (National Archives).

BIOGRAPHY: James Masterson served as the guardian for his four youngest siblings after his fathers' death. The Court in Fayette Co., KY in 1794, recorded that James paid the heirs their share L77.6.9 upon the age of 21 for William and Lazarus, and the marriage of Delia & Jane and the dates of each payment recorded. James tells much of his life story in his application for a Revolutionary War pension, including the fact he was born 7th day of April 1752 in Fairfax Co., VA, and that he lived on Pamlico River in NC. He served under George Rogers Clark in the Shawnee expedition, fought in the seige of Bryants Station and the battle of the Upper Blue Licks. He was one of the first settlers of Lexington KY, and built the first hewn log cabin in the fort there. He was noted for wearing his frontier buckskins, long after the other men in the rapidly growing Lexington stopped wearing them.

Michael L. Cook & Bettie A. Cummings Cook. Fayette County Kentucky Records Vol. 5. Evansville, IN. 1986. Cook Publications. LDS Family Historical Library. US/CAN 976.947 P2c V. 5.

RELATIONSHIP: (original page 173) pg 18-19. Guardianship account by James Masterson, guardian to William Masterson, Lazarus Masterson, Delilah Masterson and Winney Masterson, four of the heirs of Edward Masterson, dec'd of North Carolina. Recorded May Court 1804.

Ginny Schilt. Edward Masterson. His Children and Grandchildren. Masterson Family Newsletter. Vol 2 No 4 & Vol 3 No 1. Pg 55, 66-67. Library of Congress - Local History & Genealogy Room.

DEATH: Clerk of the Court. KY, Fayette Co. Will Book 12.

PROBATE-CHILDREN: Division of the estate of James Masterson 12 Mar 1839 pp 89-90, 110-11, 115, 144-146 Photocopy in possession of Regina M. Barry, Wilmington DE. His land was divided equally among his widow Margaret and his children Caleb, Robert, John, Joseph and Margaret Metcalf. Negro man Ben (value $800), negro man Ryall (value $800), negro woman Jenny (value $400) and boy Tom (value $600) were left to his wife Margaret. Son Robert id to keep the girl Lucy already in his possession. His children James, Sarah, Mary and Lovett have already received their due portions.

G. Glenn Clift. KENTUCKY OBITUARIES 1787-1854. Baltimore, MD. 1977. Genealogical Publishing Company. Pg 122. LDS Family Historical Library. US/CAN 976.9 V28c.

DEATH: Observer-Reporter, Lexington KY 12/22. James Masterson of Fayette County. One of the first settlers in Kentucky. Died Saturday December 15, 1838 aged 100 years.

COMMENT: The 100 years age is an exaggeration.

Children of JAMES MASTERSON and MARGARET WYMORE are:

i. ELIZABETH4 MASTERSON, b. June 11, 1782, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. July 20, 1784, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for ELIZABETH MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

ii. WILLIAM MASTERSON, b. December 14, 1783, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. July 17, 1814, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for WILLIAM MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

5. iii. SARAH MASTERSON, b. August 20, 1785, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. July 29, 1814, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.
iv. JOHN MASTERSON, b. January 21, 1787, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Unknown.
v. JAMES MASTERSON, b. October 30, 1788, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Aft. 1838 m. FANNY EASTHAM, November 24, 1808.
vi. MARY MASTERSON, b. March 15, 1790, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. July 08, 1833, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY m. WILLIAM EASTHAM, December 27, 1808.
vii. ROBERT MASTERSON, b. July 25, 1793, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Aft. 1850 m. MARIA BOBB, December 04, 1815.

Notes for ROBERT MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

Same birth date as Richard Masterson. Twins possibly?

viii. RICHARD MASTERSON, b. July 25, 1793, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Bef. 1838.

Notes for RICHARD MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

Same birth date as Robert Masterson Twins possibly?

ix. CALEB MASTERSON, b. January 18, 1796, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Aft. 1838 m. NANCY WILLS, Unknown b. Unknown.

Notes for CALEB MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

(Source: Nancy Robinson-Family [email protected])

x. LOVET MASTERSON, b. June 20, 1797, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. January 26, 1822, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY m. MARY WILLIAMSON, January 26, 1820 b. Unknown.
xi. EDWARD MASTERSON, b. October 26, 1798, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Bef. 1838.
xii. MARGARET MASTERSON, b. July 01, 1802, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Aft. 1838 m. MARTIN DAVIS, December 20, 1821.

Notes for MARGARET MASTERSON:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

There are other marriage (s)

Marriage Notes for MARGARET MASTERSON and MARTIN DAVIS:
(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY)

There are other marriage (s)

xiii. JOSEPH MASTERSON, b. April 23, 1807, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Aft. 1838 m. SARAH WEBSTER, April 06, 1829 b. Unknown.

5. SARAH4 MASTERSON (JAMES3, EDWARD2, EDWARD1)2 was born August 20, 1785 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY, and died July 29, 1814 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY. She married STEWART WILLIAM MEGOWAN March 02, 1803 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY, son of ROBERT MEGOWAN and MARY PARKER. He was born September 25, 1781 in Providence, Montgomery Co., PA, and died Abt. 1860 in Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for SARAH MASTERSON:
WIFE Sarah MASTERSON -345

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

(SOURCES):
LIFE: Clerk of the Court. KY, Fayette Co. Will Book 12.

PARENTS: Division of the Estate of James Masterson: pp 89-90, 110-11, 115, 144-46 Photocopy in possession Regina M. Barry, Wilmington DE. His land was divided equally among his widow and children Caleb, Robert, John, Margaret Metcalf and Joseph. His Children James, Sarah, Mary and Lovett have already received their due portions.

COMMENT: From the terminology of this will, it sounds like Sarah was living but this may have been used to handle any claims her heirs may have had on the estate.

Notes for STEWART WILLIAM MEGOWAN:
Stewart William MEGOWAN -344

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

MARRIAGE: THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION MAGAZINE. Vol LXXXII # 1 Pg 54. Morris Library - University of Delaware. MARRIAGE: Kate-Prince Ward Esker, " Genealogical Department" Marriage Bonds of Fayette Co KY. NOTE: 2 Mar 1803 Stewart Wm Megowan & Sarah Masterson, James Masterson, father gave consent.

Michael L. Cook & Bettie Cummings Cook. Fayette County Kentucky Records Vol 3. Evansville, Ind, 1985. Cook Publications. Pg 6. LDS Family History Library. US/CAN 976.947 P2c V. 3.

MARRIAGE: Stewert Megowan to Sarah Masterson 2 Mar 1803. James Masterson gave consent for his daughter Sarah to marry.

Helm, Emily Todd. TODD FAMILY ( 1718-1905 ) THE KITTOCHTINNY MAGAZINE. Vol 1 No 3 ( Aug 1905 ) Pg 375. The Free Library of Philadelphia.

MARRIAGE: born abt 1786, died at Lexington 1859. Married ______Matison.

HUSBAND Stewart William MEGOWAN-344

RESIDENCE: 1781 - PA (birth)
1803 - Lexington, Fayette Co., KY (marriage)
1850 - Lexington, Fayette Co., KY

MILITARY: Pension Application of Stewart Wm. Megowan 18xx-1859 War of 1812, Volunteers, KY, filed by Stewart Wm. Megowan, zxxxx, Pension Application #xxx National Archives, Washington DC. Photocopy in possession Regina Barry. Stewart Megowan tells much of his life story in this application. Confirmation appears in several county histories and court records.

BIOGRAPHY: Capt. Stewart W. Megowan served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812 and applied for a pension based on his services. He commanded a company of volunteers from Lexington, KY in Aug 1812, and another company, called the "Lexington Rifles" in 1812. The company suffered through a bitter winter in the North Western frontier, often without provisions. Stewart Megowan and his volunteers proceeded to Canada under the leadership of General Harrison, fighting in the battle of the Thames on Oct 5, 1813, where Tecumseh was slain. Captain Megowan was also present when Proctor's troops surrendered. Later in the war, he joined General Andrew Jacksons' army for the battle of New Orleans, 8 Jan 1815. When he arrived in New Orleans before this battle he and a riverboat captain called Twiggs beat the town for volunteers. Gen. Jackson put Twiggs & Megowan in charge of the custom house in New Orleans, and on the evening before the battle, General Jackson gave them leave to raise as many volunteers as possible to join the army. A group of five Dutch sailors who did not speak English volunteered to join his company, and were present at the victory. After the death of his second wife, he lived with his brother Thomas Megowan, and suffered very poor health which he attributed to his exposure and hardships during the war.

OTHER MARRIAGES:
Catherine-349 (MRIN:211)
Married: Bef 1830 KY

LIFE: THE REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Vol 32 Pg 257-8. Morris Library - University of Delaware.

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

After the war, Stewart Megowan returned to Lexington, where he continued to reside. He married secondly, Catherine, whose surname has not been determined. A record of their marriage has not been found.

After the death of his second wife, he lived with his brother, Thomas Megowan, and suffered very poor health which he attributed to his exposure and hardships during the war. He received a pension for his services in the War of 1812.

More About STEWART WILLIAM MEGOWAN:
Burial: Lexington, Fayette Co., KY

Children of SARAH MASTERSON and STEWART MEGOWAN are:

i. WILLIAM5 MEGOWAN, b. Aft. 1803, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Abt. 1820, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for WILLIAM MEGOWAN:
William MEGOWAN-346

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

LIFE: Helm, Emily Todd. TODD FAMILY (1718-1905). THE KITTOCHTINNY MAGAZINE. Vol 1 No 3 Pg 375. The Free Library of Philadelphia.

BIRTH-MARRIAGE-DEATH: Appears as William, dec'd. No further info given.

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

William Megowan is reported as a child of Stewart Megowan and Sarah Masterson, but no contemporary documentation has been found on him.

ii. THOMAS MEGOWAN, b. Aft. 1803, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Abt. 1820, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for THOMAS MEGOWAN:
Thomas MEGOWAN-347

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

LIFE: Helm, Emily Todd. TODD FAMILY ( 1718-1905). THE KITTOCHTINNY MAGAZINE. Vol 1 No 3 Pg 375. The Free Library of Philadelphia.

BIRTH-MARRIAGE-DEATH: Appears as Thomas, dec'd. No other info given.

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

Thomas Megowan is reported as a child of Stewart Megowan and Sarah Masterson, but no contemporary documentation has been found for him.

iii. ROBERT MADISON MEGOWAN, b. Aft. 1803, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. Abt. 1820, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY.

Notes for ROBERT MADISON MEGOWAN:
Robert Madison MEGOWAN-348

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

LIFE: Helm, Emily Todd. TODD FAMILY ( 1718-1905 ). THE KITTOCHTINNY MAGAZINE. Vol 1 No 3 Pg 375. The Free Library of Philadelphia.

BIRTH-MARRIAGE-DEATH: Appears as Robert, dec'd. No further info given.

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

Robert Megowan is reported as a child of Stewart Megowan and Sarah Masterson, but no contemporary documentation has been found for him.

iv. MARY PARKER MEGOWAN2, b. September 28, 1810, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. June 20, 1891, Middlefork, Worth Co., MO m. ELIAS GRADLIL WEIGART2, July 26, 1827, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY b. September 23, 1803, Lexington, Fayette Co., KY d. April 16, 1886, Middlefork, Worth Co., MO.

Notes for MARY PARKER MEGOWAN:
WIFE: Mary Parker MEGOWAN-309

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

RESIDENCE: 1810 KY (birth) 1827 Lexington, Fayette Co., KY
(marriage) 1850 Lockridge Township, Jefferson Co., IA
1862 Worth Co., MO
1870 Fletchall Township, Worth Co., MO.
1891 Wharton Cemetery, Worth Co., MO (burial)
LIFE:

Helm, Emily Todd. TODD FAMILY (1718-1905). THE KITTOCHTINNY MAGAZINE. Vol 1 No 3 Pg 375. The Free Library of Philadelphia.

BIRTH-MARRIAGE-DEATH: Appears as Mary, married______Weigart, they live in Iowa or Wisconsin.

1850 U. S. Federal Census. National Archives of the United Stated. National Archives-Philadelphia, PA M432.

CENSUS: Lockridge Twnship, Jefferson Co., IA dw 23 fam 23. NOTE: aged 40, born KY.

1870 U.S. Federal Census. National Archives of the United States. National Archives-Philadelphia, PA M593

CENSUS: Fletchall Township, Worth Co. MO Sheet 111 dw 1 fam 1 NOTE: Wagart, Mary P. aged 60.

Northwest Missouri Genealogy Society. 1876 Special Census, Worth Co., MO. St. Joseph, MO. Pg 10. LDS History Library. US/CAN 977.8143 x2s.

LIVING: Fletchall Township. E. G. Weigart 1 male 0-45. Mary P. female 0-45.

BIRTH: Unknown. Weigart Family Records (Bible Transcript). Regina Barry.

DEATH: Unknown. Weigart Family Records (Bible Transcript). Regina Barry. GRANT CITY STAR. Grant City, Worth Co., MO. Missouri State Historical Society.

DEATH: Grandma Weigart died at the residence of her son, L. C. Weigart on Saturday June 20, 1891 at the advanced age of 80 years, 8 months and 20 days. Her maiden name was Mary P. McGown and she was born in Lexington KY, Sept 28, 1810. Was married to Elias Weigart of the same PLACE 26 July 1826, having been his companion for 56 years previous to his death abt 6 years ago. She was a mother of 12 children - 9 sons and 3 daughters. She has resided in Worth County for years, was an estimable lady, a kind mother and leaves hosts of friends to mourn her departure. (undated clipping.)

BURIAL: Virginia Daughters Chapter. MISSOURI DAR GENEALOGY RECORDS COMMITTEE REPORT. Series 2, 1991.

BURIAL: Wharton Cemetery NOTE: Row 3. Mary P. M. Weigart died 20 June 1891 aged 80 yrs 9 mo 21 da.

Mary Parker Megowan was named after her grandmother, Mary Parker. She married Elias Weigart in Lexington, but moved to Iowa to escape the cholera epidemics which were sweeping Lexington in the 1830's. The family later moved to Worth Co., Missouri.

More About MARY PARKER MEGOWAN:
Burial: Wharton Cemetary, Worth Co., MO

Notes for ELIAS GRADLIL WEIGART:
HUSBAND: Elias Gradlil WEIGART-308

(FROM THE PAGES OF REGINA BARRY):

RESEARCH: Oral tradition has given his father Philip Weigart and mother Christina Gradlil. Early records in Lexington KY suggest Geroge Weigart, hatmaker, was a resident there. A Philip Weigart appears in a census record but family naming patterns suggest 'George' as a more likely candidate. Further research needed here.

1850 U.S. Federal Census. National Archives of the United States. National Archives-Philadelphia, PA. M432. CENSUS: Lockridge Twnshp, Jefferson Co., IA dw 23 fam 23. NOTE: aged 47, farmer, born KY. RESEARCH: born VA and Mary Weigart, aged 60, born NC. Are these relatives? The name Weigart is relatively rare, esp. in VA and KY (Several colonial Weigart are in PA).

1870 U.S. Federal Census. National Archives of the United States. National Archives-Philadelphia, PA M593.

CENSUS: Fletchall Township, Worth Co. MO. Sheet pg 111 dw 1 fam 1. NOTE: Elias G. Weigart, aged 66. Value of real estate 10,000.

Northwest Missouri Genealogy Society. Worth County Missouri Death Notices from Area Newspapers 1894-1899. St. Joseph, MO.. Pg 4. LDS Family History Library.

OCCUPATION: Obituary of Mortimer Bostick, died 30 Aug 1895 in Marysville, MO. He was born in Lexington KY 27 Mar 1807. In their younger days, he & Elias Weigart, who died near here several years ago, were apprentices at the same time in Lexington--one a shoemaker and the other a harness maker. They both came to Worth Co.

Northwest Missouri Genealogy Society. 1876 Special Census, Worth Co., MO. St. Joseph, MO. pg 10. LDA Family History Library. US/CAN 977.8143 x2s.

LIVING: Fletchall Township. E. G. Weigart 1 male 0-45. Mary P. 1 female 0-45.

Northwest Missouri Genealogy Society. Worth County MO 1862 Tax Assessors Book. St. Joseph, MO. Pg 51. LDS Family History Library. US/CAN 977.8143 R4w.

LIVING: E. G. Weigart was taxed $8.18 on 550 acres of land.

BIRTH: Unknown. Weigart Family Records (Bible Transcript). Regina Barry.

BIRTH-DEATH: In Possession of Regina Barry.

BURIAL: Virginia Daughters Chapter. MISSOURI DAR GENEALOGY RECORDS COMMITTEE REPORT. Series 2, 1991.

BURIAL: Wharton Cemetery: NOTE: Row 3. Elias G. Weigart died April 16, 1886 aged 83 yrs 8 mo 23 da.

WIFE Mary Parker MEGOWAN-309

More About ELIAS GRADLIL WEIGART:
Burial: Wharton Cemetary, Worth Co., MO.


Edward J. Masterson

Lawman. 1852 - 1878

The brother of Bat Masterson, Edward was the oldest of the seven Masterson children. Born in Canada East in 1852, he and his other brother, Jim, both served as marshals of Dodge City in the late 1870s. While performing his official duties on the evening of April 9, 1878, Ed was shot and killed by two drunken cowboys from Hays. Before he collapsed, he fatally shot one of his attackers and seriously wounded the other.

Entry: Masterson, Edward J.

Author: Kansas Historical Society

Author information: The Kansas Historical Society is a state agency charged with actively safeguarding and sharing the state's history.

Date Created: February 2011

Date Modified: March 2011

The author of this article is solely responsible for its content.

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Western gunslinger, Bat Masterson, fights in last shootout

On the streets of Dodge City, famous western lawman and gunfighter Bat Masterson fights the last gun battle of his life.

Bartholomew �t” Masterson had made a living with his gun from a young age. In his early 20s, Masterson worked as a buffalo hunter, operating out of the wild Kansas cattle town of Dodge City. For several years, he also found employment as an army scout in the Plains Indian Wars. Masterson had his first shootout in 1876 in the town of Sweetwater (later Mobeetie), Texas. When an argument with a soldier over the affections of a dance hall girl named Molly Brennan heated up, Masterson and his opponent resorted to their pistols. When the shooting stopped, both Brennan and the soldier were dead, and Masterson was badly wounded.

Found to have been acting in self-defense, Masterson avoided prison. Once he had recovered from his wounds, he apparently decided to abandon his rough ways and become an officer of the law. For the next five years, Masterson alternated between work as Dodge City sheriff and running saloons and gambling houses, gaining a reputation as a tough and reliable lawman. However, Masterson’s critics claimed that he spent too much as sheriff, and he lost a bid for reelection in 1879.

For several years, Masterson drifted around the West. Early in 1881, news that his younger brother, Jim, was in trouble back in Dodge City reached Masterson in Tombstone, Arizona. Jim’s dispute with a business partner and an employee, A.J. Peacock and Al Updegraff respectively, had led to an exchange of gunfire. Though no one had yet been hurt, Jim feared for his life. Masterson immediately took a train to Dodge City.

When his train pulled into Dodge City on this morning in 1881, Masterson wasted no time. He quickly spotted Peacock and Updegraff and aggressively shouldered his way through the crowded street to confront them. “I have come over a thousand miles to settle this,” Masterson reportedly shouted. “I know you are heeled [armed]-now fight!” All three men immediately drew their guns. Masterson took cover behind the railway bed, while Peacock and Updegraff darted around the corner of the city jail. Several other men joined in the gunplay. One bullet meant for Masterson ricocheted and wounded a bystander. Updegraff took a bullet in his right lung.

The mayor and sheriff arrived with shotguns to stop the battle when a brief lull settled over the scene. Updegraff and the wounded bystander were taken to the doctor and both eventually recovered. In fact, no one was mortally injured in the melee, and since the shootout had been fought fairly by the Dodge City standards of the day, no serious charges were imposed against Masterson. He paid an $8 fine and took the train out of Dodge City that evening.

Masterson never again fought a gun battle in his life, but the story of the Dodge City shootout and his other exploits ensured Masterson’s lasting fame as an icon of the Old West. He spent the next four decades of his life working as sheriff, operating saloons, and eventually trying his hand as a newspaperman in New York City. The old gunfighter finally died of a heart attack in October 1921 at his desk in New York City.


Masterson was 37 years old, and a lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, The Devonshire Regiment, British Army during the Second Boer War when the following deed took place on 6 January 1900, at Wagon Hill, Ladysmith, South Africa for which he was awarded the VC:

During the action at Wagon Hill, on the 6th January, 1900, Lieutenant Masterson commanded, with the greatest gallantry and dash, one of the three companies of his regiment which charged a ridge held by the enemy and captured their position.

The companies were then exposed to a most heavy and galling fire from the right and left front. Lieutenant Masterson undertook to give a message to the Imperial Light Horse, who were holding a ridge some hundred yards behind, to fire to the left front and endeavour to check the enemy's fire.

In taking this message he crossed an open space of a hundred yards which was swept by a most heavy cross fire, and although badly wounded in both thighs, managed to crawl in and deliver his message before falling exhausted into the Imperial Light Horse trench. His unselfish heroism was undoubtedly the means of saving several lives. Ώ]

He transferred to the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment as a Major in 1911 and retired in 1912. In 1914 he returned to the Army as a Deputy Director of Railway Transport. He died at Waterlooville, Hampshire, England, on 24 December 1935, aged 73.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Military Museum of Devon and Dorset, Dorchester, Dorset, England.

His ancestor, also surnamed Masterson, captured a Napoleonic eagle at Barossa in 1811 and was given a field commission - this is portrayed in Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Fury


Edward Masterson

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Community Contributions

D Wong on 13th February, 2016 wrote:

Edward Masterson was 69 years old on arrival in NSW – he was married with 9 children.

Sick list of the Borodino convict ship for 4 December 1827 to 25 July 1828….
Edward Masterson, aged 69, convict disease, diarrhoea put on sick list, 18 February 1828. Date discharged 29 February 1828.

1836: TOL Field of Mars.
1/7/1843: CP

April 1850: Was and inmate of the Parramatta Benevolent Society.

Convict Changes History

D Wong on 13th February, 2016 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: 99 years, voyage, source: http://members.pcug.org.au/

ppmay/convicts.htm (prev. ), firstname: Edward, surname: Masterson, alias1: , alias2: , alias3: , alias4: , date of birth: 1759, date of death: 0000, gender: m, occupation, crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au

British Convict transportation register made available by the State Library of Queensland


A few key terms

Old language or the language of the gods
Dóttir: Daughter

Reginkunnrsól: Divine Sun, chief god of the old world

Sipill: Potlicker, Gid’s favourite insult

Vándrormr: Evil Dragon, the ultimate evil of the old world

Sigyn’s preferred curses
“Ach du lieber!”: “For the love of!” (German)

“Din jævla idiot!”: “You fucking idiot!” (Norwegian)

“Dra til helvete”: “Go to hell.” (Norwegian)

“Perkele”: Fuck, surprisingly common curse (Finnish)

“Timpitule!”: “You moron!” (Romanian)

Sid/Edward’s preferred curses
“Poutanas gie!”: “Son of a bitch!” (Greek)

“Poga ua”: “Pain in the neck” (Samoan)


Edward Masterson

  • Margaret Masterson 1534-1580
  • Joane Masterson 1542-1579/
  • Elisabeth Mastersone 1543-1578
  • Edmund Masterson 1544-1621
  • Mildred Masterson 1544-1620
  • John Masterson 1550-1551
  • John MASTERSON 1550-
  • Edmund Masterson 1573-1598/

Bat Masterson

After a century of newspaper and magazine articles, novels and biographies, motion pictures and television dramas, the image of Bat Masterson as fearless Western gunfighter, gambler and lawman is firmly imbedded in the public consciousness. But few today are aware that William Barclay Masterson, better known as Bat, achieved fame in an entirely different field and arena, or that he spent the last 20 years of his life as a boxing authority and newspaper columnist in New York City.

Pugnacious by nature and a gambler by profession, Masterson was drawn to the prize ring during the 1880s, when prizefighting was promoted and controlled by professional gamblers. Over the next 40 years he attended almost every important fistic event held in the country and was involved as manager, ring official, promoter and boxing columnist. In 1893 the National Police Gazette, America’s barber shop bible, hailed him as ‘The King of Western Sporting Men,’ one who ‘backs pugilists, can play any game on the green with a full deck and handles a bowie or a revolver with the determination of a Napoleon.’

Masterson’s first sports columns were written for George’s Weekly, a Denver newspaper. When a boxing promotion partnership with Otto Floto, sports editor of the Denver Post, ended rancorously, Masterson took up the pen to retaliate against vituperation Floto hurled at him in his columns. The word battle led to a street brawl in July 1900. Bat belabored Floto with his cane and sent him running. Many Denverites viewed the feud as a comic affair, but it grew more serious when Floto and his Post employers imported notorious gunman ‘Whispering Jim’ Smith to deal with Masterson. The two gunfighters never met, but in May 1902 Bat, disgusted with Denver, left town.

Accompanied by prominent Chicago gambler Charles E. ‘Parson’ Davies, he went to New York City and booked passage on the ocean liner Lucania, sailing for England on Saturday, June 7. The two sporting men saw an opportunity for lucrative boxing promotions during the celebrations planned for the coronation of the new British king, Edward VII.

But Bat Masterson was not destined to make that trip. The day before he was to sail, two detectives arrested him on a Manhattan street corner, booked him on charges of running a crooked faro game and relieved him of a large pistol. The arrest story filled the front pages of the city’s newspapers. New Yorkers were fascinated by the appearance in their city of a real-life Western man-killer, toting the six-shooter with which he had dispatched two dozen or more badmen.

Oddly enough, the legend of Bat Masterson, gunfighter nonpareil, had its genesis in a wildly exaggerated story about him in a New York newspaper more than 20 years earlier. Titled ‘A Mild Eyed Man Who Killed Twenty-six Persons,’ the largely fictitious account first appeared in the New York Sun in 1881 and was reprinted in papers all over the country. Now, in 1902, the New York papers trotted out the old canards about Masterson’s sanguinary career, the story went out over the news services, and the legend was further reinforced.

Masterson’s arrest was the result of a complaint filed by George H. Snow of Salt Lake City, a Mormon elder who claimed he had been swindled out of $16,000 in a braced faro game. Bat was also charged with carrying a concealed weapon. He was arraigned and released on $2,500 bond, pending a hearing scheduled for the following Monday. When Snow failed to appear at the hearing, the judge dismissed the swindling charge but fined Masterson $10 for carrying a concealed weapon.

The affair caused Bat to miss his ship to England and embarrassed him publicly. He sued Snow for $10,000, claiming false arrest and damage ‘to his good name as a square gambler.’ Snow procured an affidavit, signed by the arresting officers, stating that he had never named Masterson as a party to the fleecing scheme, and the case was settled out of court.

Despite his rather unpleasant welcome to New York, Masterson was captivated by the city. He remained there for the next 20 years, living and working within easy walking distance of Longacre Square (later Times Square), the heart of the sporting and theatrical district, the site of the best restaurants and hotels, and the center of New York night life. It was an environment far different from the dusty streets of Dodge City where he had first achieved renown, but the 49-year-old former frontiersman adapted well to this new milieu. In New York he became one of the ‘Broadway guys’ immortalized by Damon Runyon in his popular short stories. (In the hugely successful stage play and motion picture Guys and Dolls, based on Runyon’s stories, the character Sky Masterson, Colorado gambler, played by Marlon Brando in the movie, is drawn from Runyon’s memory of his close friend Bat Masterson.)

Bat had many friends, but none had a more profound effect on his success in New York than the Lewis brothers, Alfred Henry and William Eugene. Both were journalists who had known him since they worked on Kansas City papers in the 1880s.

Alfred Henry Lewis first gained national attention with the publication in 1897 of his book Wolfville, a collection of Western stories. Over the next 17 years, Lewis published 18 fiction and nonfiction volumes and became the nation’s highest paid magazine writer. Pugnacious and noncomformist, Lewis had much in common with Masterson, for whom he became mentor and benefactor as Bat made the transition from Western frontier sporting man to Eastern metropolis newspaperman and prize ring pundit. Alfred Henry Lewis widely popularized the legend of Bat Masterson, writing highly imaginative articles about him for national magazines and a novel, The Sunset Trail, which appeared in 1905. As editor of a slick monthly magazine called Human Life, Lewis published in 1907-08 a series of Masterson articles on gunfighters Bat had known in the West.

Younger brother William Eugene Lewis sponsored Bat’s journalistic career. As managing editor of the New York Morning Telegraph, W.E. Lewis hired Masterson as a sportswriter and quickly promoted him to columnist and sports editor. As Lewis gained greater control of the Telegraph, rising to general manager and finally president, Bat followed his friend right up the ladder, eventually becoming vice president and company secretary. He worked at the paper until his death in 1921.

The Telegraph was unlike the other dozen or so daily papers published in New York City. News of prominent people, especially if it involved divorce, scandal or suicide, got extensive coverage. The photograph of a beautiful young woman, usually a showgirl, adorned every front page. The lead story on page one was as likely to be a horse race or a prizefight as a presidential election. Sensational crime stories were featured, but attention was given also to financial reports, racetrack betting odds, vaudeville, theater and motion picture news and sports, particularly boxing. The New York Morning Telegraph was a combination of Daily Racing Form, Wall Street Journal, Variety, Sporting News, Billboard and Silver Screen Magazine, with a dash of National Inquirer.

Memorable personalities who worked with Bat on the Telegraph included Sam Taub, Louella Parsons, Stuart N. Lake, John Barrymore and Heywood Broun. Taub, hired as an office boy by Masterson in 1908, later gave blow-by-blow accounts of 7,500 fights over the radio. Louella Parsons went from the paper’s motion picture department to California, where she reigned as the queen of Hollywood gossip. Stuart Lake, as a young reporter on the Telegraph, was captivated by the Wild West stories spun by Masterson, and 20 years later made Wyatt Earp a household name with his classic biography of Bat’s friend. Barrymore worked as a caricaturist on the paper before achieving fame as a stage and screen actor. Broun had a brilliant journalistic career and became the first president of the American Newspaper Guild.

Bat’s columns, headed ‘Masterson’s Views on Timely Topics,’ appeared three times a week. Lengthy commentaries churned out over 18 years, they totaled more than 4 million words. Dealing primarily with the fight game, they often were spiced with outspoken, iconoclastic opinions on war, crime, politics and societal changes. As his renown as a boxing authority grew, his comments were picked up and reprinted in this country and abroad. Occasional quaint aphorisms appeared:

‘There are more ways to kill a dog than by choking him to death with a piece of custard pie.’

‘Every dog, we are told, has his day, unless there are more dogs than days.’

‘When a man is at the racetrack he roars longer and louder over the twenty-five cents he loses through the hole in the bottom of his pocket than he does over the $25 he loses through the hole in the top of his pocket.’

‘There are those who argue that everything breaks even in this old dump of a world of ours. I suppose these ginks who argue that way hold that because the rich man gets ice in the summer and the poor man gets it in the winter things are breaking even for both. Maybe so, but I’ll swear I can’t see it that way.’

What distinguished the Masterson columns were his passion for boxing and his willingness to express his beliefs honestly and with utter fearlessness. ‘I dare and double dare any sports writer of today to say some of the things about managers and boxers that old Bat Masterson used to say in almost every column he produced,’ Damon Runyon wrote in 1933. ‘Bat had no literary style but he had plenty of moxie.’ When Masterson refused to embellish his accounts of ring battles with fanciful embroidery to make dull fights sound more exciting, some critics called him a ‘ham reporter.’ If telling the truth was the qualification, Bat admitted cheerfully, he was ‘a ham of the most pronounced type.’

Masterson was a frequent visitor at the White House during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt, who was fascinated by Western men of action, particularly the ‘two-gun man.’ As a New Yorker who became a Westerner, Roosevelt had a special interest in Bat Masterson, the Westerner who became a New Yorker. Teddy and Bat shared another bond, the love of prizefighting. Washington papers reported that during his White House sojourns Bat regaled the president with inside stories of early ring battles while statesmen cooled their heels in waiting rooms.

On the recommendation of Alfred Henry Lewis, Roosevelt in early 1905 ordered Masterson’s appointment as deputy U.S. marshal for the southern district of New York. Assigned to the office of the U. S. attorney, Bat held his commission for four years and four months, a singularly lucrative period for him. The duties of the position, which consisted primarily of maintaining security in the grand jury room when that body was in session, did not interfere with his newspaper work, and he reported to his boss, Marshal William Henkel, only on payday. This sweetheart sinecure was worth $2,000 a year. William Howard Taft, who followed Roosevelt to the White House in 1909, ordered Masterson’s job abolished. Bat, a seasoned gambler who knew that no run of luck lasts forever, shrugged, pocketed his winnings and moved on.

In the West, Bat Masterson had warred fiercely with his enemies, firing verbal and written salvos and resorting on occasion to fists, cane and pistol. His battles in New York mostly were confined to published harangues, but there were a few physical clashes. One was with Richard D. Plunkett, a man Bat had known in Creede, Colo., where Plunkett gained some frontier prominence as the lawman who arrested Ed O’Kelley, the man who killed Bob Ford, slayer of Jesse James.

In 1906 Plunkett came to New York and, with a man named Dinklesheets, toured the Broadway watering holes, denouncing the city’s famous Western gunfighter, Bat Masterson, as a fraud and a phony. When this calumny reached Bat, he confronted Plunkett and Dinklesheets in the cafe of the staid Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. After an angry verbal exchange, an inebriated Dinklesheets swung clumsily at Masterson and missed. Bat knocked him down. Thrusting his hand into a side pocket, Masterson then shoved something against Plunkett’s stomach. Somebody yelled: ‘Look out! Bat’s going to flash Betsy!’ and there was a general rush for the exits. Police arrived, separated the combatants, and sent them on their way. No one was arrested. A reporter later cornered Bat and asked to see the gun that had panicked the hotel patrons. Bat smiled and pulled a package of cigarettes from his pocket.

For years Masterson feuded with sports editor and cartoonist Bob Edgren of the New York Evening World. Following some fairly innocuous sparring in their respective columns, Edgren on December 10, 1909, reviled Bat and Wyatt Earp in a column headed, ‘Why Gunfighters Fail as Referees.’ After ridiculing Masterson’s journalistic ability and ring knowledge, Edgren attacked Earp for his controversial referee’s decision in 1896 when he awarded Tom Sharkey a victory over Bob Fitzsimmons on a foul, and repeated the charge that Earp took a bribe to ensure a Sharkey victory. Bat sent the column to Earp, who responded with a letter vehemently denying Edgren’s allegations, including one that Wyatt notched his pistols to mark his murder victims. Earp concluded by saying he would like to cut 12 neatly carved notches on Bob Edgren’s lying tongue.

In 1911 Edgren’s brother Leonard, sportswriter for the New York Globe and Advertiser, included in a column an allegation by fight manager Frank Ufer that Bat’s gunfighter reputation had been gained by shooting drunken Mexicans and Indians in the back. Bat quickly brought suit for $10,000 against Ufer, charging him with false and defamatory remarks. Settlement for an undisclosed amount was reached out of court. Bat also filed suit against the publishers of the paper for $25,000. When that case went to trial in May 1913, Benjamin N. Cardoza, later a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, represented the newspaper. He grilled Masterson at length regarding his gunfighter reputation. Bat heatedly denied shooting anyone, drunk or sober, in the back. He admitted shooting Indians in battle, but could not say if any were drunk. He said he never shot a Mexican in the front or in the back. The jury agreed that Masterson had been defamed and awarded damages of $3,500, plus court costs. Masterson never reconciled his differences with either Bob Edgren or his old Denver enemy, Otto Floto. When Jack Dempsey came on the ring scene, Edgren was an early votary of the sensational Colorado heavyweight and Bat learned that Floto had once managed Dempsey and reportedly still owned a piece of him. Contempt for his enemies clouded Bat’s judgment, leading him to badly underestimate Dempsey’s remarkable ring prowess.

Bat even disparaged a racehorse who had the misfortune, in his view, of being named Otto Floto. ‘How could a horse win any kind of race,’ he asked, ‘with that sort of a name wished on him?’ But this horse-name business cut two ways. When a nag named Bat Masterson dropped dead one day on the back stretch, Floto wrote a column titled ‘Poetic Justice,’ opining that even an elephant could not bear the weight of both a jockey and a bad name.

Masterson also waged a vendetta against New York boxing commission chairmen he felt were detrimental to the sport and finally succeeded in getting two of them ousted. A new commissioner named Walter Hooke was appointed in 1921. Bat deemed him unqualified and said so in his column. A few nights later as Bat sat at his usual ringside seat at Madison Square Garden, an angry Hooke upbraided him in stentorian, foul-mouthed terms. The reaction of a younger Bat Masterson would have been swift and violent, but at 67, Bat was too old, too tired and too wise. He retaliated instead with his pen, calling the governor’s attention to the commission chairman’s unprofessional behavior and demanding his immediate dismissal. Soon the governor gave Hooke the hook and appointed William Muldoon, one of Bat’s oldest and closest friends, as chairman.

Bat and William S. Hart, the era’s top Western movie star, were longtime friends. Openly in awe of Masterson, Hart told Louella Parsons: ‘I play the hero that Bat Masterson inspired. More than any other man I have ever met I admire and respect him.’ On October 7, 1921, Hart and Masterson were photographed together on the roof of the Morning Telegraph building and also in Bat’s office, with the actor sitting at Bat’s desk, the old Westerner standing behind. Eighteen days later, seated in that chair at that desk, Bat Masterson would breathe his last. On Tuesday morning, October 25, he wrote his final column. When it was finished, he was seized by a sudden heart attack, collapsed over his desk and passed on without a sound. It was, as Damon Runyon put it, ‘a strangely quiet closing to a strangely active career.’

This article was written by R.K. DeArment and originally appeared in the June 2001 issue of Wild West.

For more great articles be sure to subscribe to Wild West magazine today!


Edward Masterson, Ph.D.

Profession: Has not picked an official profession, as he has just graduated from Berkeley. Works unofficially travelling to various conventions to give speeches on his research.

Education: Completed undergraduate work at University of Hawai’i, completed graduate and post graduate at University of California: Berkeley

Bachelors: Archeology and Linguistics

Ph.D.: Sociocultural Anthropology

Disposition and Personality: While his twin brother is the laid back and easy going of the two, Edward is the more serious and studious twin. He comes off as the more gentlemanly of the two, and is more prone to being quiet and observant than loud and boisterous

Hobbies: Chess, travelling to dig cites for consults

Interests: Ancient cultures, music through the ages

Weaknesses: His brother, people in distress, rare books

Faults: Is sometimes too serious, quick to anger when it comes to his family

Pet Peeves: People looking down on him for his sexuality, people who ignore history, people who get information incorrect

Fears: Losing his brother, being caught in a cave in (happened once, he’s now unable to sleep without a light), people not treating him equally, just because he’s gay

Guilty Pleasures: Curiosity shops, Dim Sum, Spam and Pineapple

Prized Possessions: A silver band that he wears on his right arm, his notebooks, his father’s ring, an old dagger that never seems to lose its edge

Bad Habits: Tends to have “Diva moments” as Sid calls them, when he gets overly frustrated

Proudest accomplishments: Made it all the way through college on scholarships alone.

Secret Talents: Psychokinesis, talented artist

Typical Clothing: Prefers to dress nicely, either in a suit or a polo and very clean jeans. When dressing casual, can be found in an unbuttoned Hawaiian shirt, board shorts, and river sandals

Distinguishing marks: Tattoo on left arm is a Maori style sleeve with a fire and water theme


Watch the video: Dressage Movements RevealedJim MastersonThe Masterson Method


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