Majestic II SP-3061 - History

Majestic II SP-3061 - History


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Majestic

II

(SP-3061: t. 717; 1. 201'10"; b. 30'; dr. 10'3"; s. 12 k.;
cpl. 27)

The second Majestic (SP-3061), a steel-hulled, paddlewheel steamer, was built in 1903 at Elizabethport, N.J., as Happy Day; chartered by the Navy 30 August 1918 from Potomac & Chesapeake Steamboat Co.; and commissioned the same day.

Assigned to the 5th Naval District, she patrolled the Potomac and carried passengers to nearby points. After World War I ended, Majestic was returned to her owner 24 March 1919. She continued in merchant service until abandoned in 1928.


Homer Laughlin China Co. History, Patterns, Colors

Homer Laughlin China Company established a small pottery plant—one of the first whiteware plants in the United States—in the early 1870s. The two-kiln firm, located in East Liverpool, Ohio, was first founded by brothers Homer and Shakespeare Laughlin as Ohio Valley Pottery. It later became Laughlin Bros., according to Warman’s Antiques & Collectibles.

The company excelled at the Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia where they were recognized with an award for the best white-ware on display. In 1879, Shakespeare sold his interest in the pottery to his brother, and Homer ran the business for more than two decades until he eventually sold it to a group of investors. The company’s then-bookkeeper William E. Wells along with Louis Aaron and his sons, Charles and Marcus, assumed ownership in 1897.

The new owners moved the firm to Newell, West Virginia in 1907, and built a new factory that boasted 30 kilns. The factory still operates in that location today as the HCL Inc. family of companies that includes Hall China as well.

By 1908, the Homer Laughlin China Company was producing 300,000 pieces a day, according to Homer Laughlin: Decades of Dinnerware by Bob Page (Replacements, Ltd.). In 1916 more kilns were added, and by 1920 the company could not keep up with demand.

Over time, this thriving business made thousands of patterns of china. Many had decoration variations on the same shapes. A few of the most popular with collectors are detailed below.


Jan Zabinski was a zookeeper and member of the Polish resistance

At the height of Adolf Hitler&aposs reign, Jan Zabinski was director of the Warsaw Zoo and superintendent of the city parks. He was also secretly part of the Polish resistance and used his distinct professional standing to smuggle food and Jews in and out of the Warsaw Ghetto. Although Antonina knew her husband was involved in the resistance, she didn&apost know the full extent. In fact, Jan was deeply active — smuggling weapons, building bombs, overthrowing trains, and even poisoning meat that was being fed to the Nazis.

As a staunch atheist, Jan credits his willingness to fight for the Jews as an opportunity to show his humanity. "I do not belong to any party, and no party program was my guide during the occupation. " he said. "My deeds were and are a consequence of a certain psychological composition, a result of a progressive-humanistic upbringing, which I received at home as well as in Kreczmar High School. Many times I wished to analyze the causes for dislike for Jews and I could not find any, besides artificially formed ones."


Accusing the Accusers

During the investigative hearings, members of HUAC grilled the witnesses about their past and present associations with the Communist Party. Aware that their answers could ruin their reputations and careers, most individuals either sought leniency by cooperating with investigators or cited their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. However, a group of 10 Hollywood screenwriters and directors took a different approach and openly challenged the legitimacy of the committee’s investigations.

The 10 individuals who defied HUAC were Alvah Bessie (c. 1904-85), Herbert Biberman (1900-71), Lester Cole (c. 1904-85), Edward Dmytryk (1908-99), Ring Lardner Jr. (1915-2000), John Howard Lawson (1894-1977), Albert Maltz (1908-1985), Samuel Ornitz (1890-1957), Robert Adrian Scott (1912-73) and Dalton Trumbo (1905-76). These men, who became known as the Hollywood Ten, not only refused to cooperate with the investigation but denounced the HUAC anti-communist hearings as an outrageous violation of their civil rights, as the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gave them the right to belong to any political organization they chose. Some compared the committee’s coercive methods and intimidating tactics to the oppressive measures enacted in Nazi Germany. “I am not on trial here,” declared screenwriter Lawson. “This committee is on trial.”


The Sprite Mk11 1100 and Midget Mk1 1100

(H-AN7 and G-AN2 models)

The next milestone was the introduction of a 1098cc variant of the trusty BMC &lsquoA&rsquo Series engine in 1963. Along with the improved performance, the brakes were duly uprated with front disc brakes&rsquo appearing for the first time in production on the cars &ndash prior to this, a disc brake conversion kit had been independently marketed by the Healey Motor Company of Warwick. Otherwise virtually unchanged, the new models were known simply as the Sprit Mk11 1100 and Midget 1100 they are now often colloquially referred to as the &lsquoMk 2 ½&rsquo and &lsquoMk 1 ½&rsquo respectively.

The Sprite Mk111 and Midget Mk11

(H-AN8 and G-AN3 models)

Many aspects of the design were changed at the next revamp, which occurred in 1964. The body of the Sprite Mk111 and Midget Mk11, largely unchanged in silhouette, received an all new dash layout, fitted carpets in all models, a new windscreen with easier to fit hood attachments, plus wind up windows to replace the sidescreens. These were all improvements inspired by the marketplace (America in particular), which was beginning to lean towards less spartanly equipped, more comfortable cars.

For the same reasons, the beautifully handling but harsh riding rear suspension lost its quarter elliptic springs, gaining instead a more conventional semi-elliptical spring layout which lost a little of the accuracy and sharpness but improved the ride enormously. A benefit not seen at the time, but in the cars&rsquo old age now greatly appreciated, is the fact that the new suspension did not impose so much stress on the monocoque body. With the result that split seams, cracks and corrosion around the rear floor and bulkhead were (and are) on the whole much less common on post 1964 cars.

In answer to misgivings about the bottom end durability of the engine, larger main bearings were fitted. A larger clutch and strengthened (&lsquoRibbed Case&rsquo as opposed to the previous &lsquoSmooth Case&rsquo) gearbox were also introduced, keeping the model range in line with the other BMC products using that basic type of gearbox, the Morris Minor, Austin A40 and A35 van.

The Sprite Mk1V and Midget Mk111

(H-AN9 and G-AN4 models)

By 1966, Sprite and Midget performance figures were beginning to look a little feeble when compared with contemporary saloon cars-not an idea situation for a sportscar to be in. Indeed, the immensely popular Mini Cooper &lsquoS&rsquo, which was also a product of BMC, was taking the limelight and eating into potential sales. In an effort to counter this, a slightly detuned version (apparently for reliability&rsquos sake) of the 1275cc Cooper &lsquoS&rsquo engine was fitted to the 1967 Sprite Mk1V and Midget Mk111.

Along with the improved performance, the new models also benefited from a new, convenient, fold down hood design. It was at this time that cars destined for North America began to seriously deviate in their specification from those built for markets in the rest of the world, due to increasingly stringent safety and emissions regulations there. Also during this period, Midgets bound for Australia were built there from completely knocked down (CKD) kits supplied from England.

The Sprite Mk1V and Midget Mk111

(H-AN10/A-AN10 and G-AN5 models)

&lsquoLeylandised&rdquo versions of the cars arrived for the 1970 model year, in fact some eighteen months after MG, Austin and their parent companies had become part of the massive British Leyland Motor Corporation. The nomenclature-Sprite Mk1V and Midget Mk111 &ndash remained the same as before, as did the mechanical and sheet metal specifications. However, the car now had a much more upbeat contemporary appearance, due to a myriad of trim changes both outside and in.

Gone was the 1960&rsquos style brightwork. A new radiator grille (effectively a blacked out and jazzed up version of the previous Sprite grille) was complemented by slim-line bumpers, fashionably quartered at the rear. Completing the slim-line effect, the sills were also painted satin black, giving the car a sleeker side profile. New spoke steel wheels (&lsquoRostyles&rsquo) aesthetically matched the car as well as the optional, more traditional, wire wheels, demand for which began to fade. Inside the car, heat welded vinyl abounded, instead of stitched pleat upholstery this style of interior trim was to remain with the vehicle up to the end of production.

Towards the end of 1971, the Sprite disappeared quietly form the new car showrooms. Sales had slowly slipped away and had latterly been confined to the home market. The last 1022 Sprites were simply labeled as &lsquoAustin&rsquo, since the agreement between Leyland and Healey had lapsed.

The Midget Mk111, however, remained comfortable in production, seeing in 1972 with new rear wings with the square top wheel arches replaced by round ones (not seen on Sprites and Midgets since the &lsquoFrogeye&rsquo). As a result it became easier to fit fatter tires and alloy wheels, which were popular aftermarket accessories at the time. If the urge to fit them was resisted, the car would definitely be sitting on radial ply tires: they became standard fitment alongside a much needed alternator (which replaced the by then archaic dynamo). As a sop to forthcoming home market safety regulations rocker switches found their way onto the dashboard, replacing the more satisfying but apparently less safe toggle switches. By 1974, Midget sales in mainland Europe had ceased, basically leaving Britain, the USA, Canada and Japan taking the car.

The Midget 1500

As an attempt to rationalize on the build specification, many of the safety and emissions changes necessary for the 1975 North American specification models were also implemented on home market vehicles. These included the well know &lsquorubber&rsquo bumpers (actually plastic), a ride height increase of one inch to meet bumper height regulations, a return to square rear wheel arches and a whole new power train.

As USA emission control equipment had progressively strangled the 1275 engine, the performance maintaining solution was to replace it with the engine out of its closet rival &ndash the Triumph Spitfire. The Spitfire engine had already had its capacity enlarged from 1296 to 1491cc for the same emissions related reasons, while the old BMC &lsquoA&rsquo Series unit could not reliable be taken any larger than its current 1275cc. As a result, the entire Triumph engine and gearbox assembly, with only a couple of detail changes, was fitted into the Midge engine bay.

This car became known as the Midget 1500, although actually it was still a Midge Mk111 officially (and in most respects under the skin was very similar to the outgoing 1275 engine Mk111). While it certainly lacked the keener, sportier edge of the earlier cars, it was undeniably a better cruising vehicle (though sadly it never benefited from the overdrive, which was optional on the same gearbox when fitted in a Spitfire).

Sprite and Midge production finally finished in 1979, when the last Midget 1500&rsquos rolled off the line. Ironically, amongst the last cars built were five hundred special black models, celebrating fifty years of MG Midget production. In total, 355,888 Sprites and Midges were built between 1958 and 1979.

PRODUCTION FIGURES
YEAR RHD HOME RHD EXPORT LHD EXPORT LHD NORTH AMERICA RHD CKD LHD CKD TOTAL
1958 1927 706 5898 169 29 8729
1959 4042 396 16908 220 0 21566
1960 3972 339 13441 872 24 18648
1961 0 0 0 44 0 44
TOTAL 9941 1441 36247 1305 53 48987
SPRITE MK II (HAN6)
1961 1607 295 8028 90 10020
1962 1989 205 8000 236 10430
TOTAL 3596 500 3214 12814 326 20450
SPRITE MK II (HAN7)
1962 179 48 251 989 141 1611
1963 1400 149 1523 5064 716 8852
1964 31 8 9 588 116 752
TOTAL 1610 205 1783 6641 976 11215
MIDGET MKI (GAN1)
1961 1124 266 1353 4889 24 7656
1962 2295 498 1727 3832 24 48 8424
TOTAL 3419 764 3080 8721 48 48 16080
MIDGET MKI (GAN2)
1962 288 114 384 678 6 12 1482
1963 2066 313 1654 3562 30 7625
1964 140 10 1 337 6 494
TOTAL 2494 437 2039 4577 42 12 9601
SPRITE MKIII (HAN8)
1964 1773 147 1315 6562 608 10405
1965 2209 159 775 5095 644 8882
1966 1143 97 332 4902 144 6618
TOTAL 5125 403 2422 16559 1396 25905
MIDGET MKII (GAN3)
1964 3061 340 1695 5830 30 10956
1965 3626 278 844 4390 24 9162
1966 2597 131 516 3215 24 6483
TOTAL 9284 749 3055 13455 78 26601
SPRITE MKIV (HAN9)
1966 352 5 37 12 406
1967 1270 83 339 5203 6895
1968 1005 38 164 5842 7049
1969 900 34 94 4979 6007
TOTAL 3527 160 634 16036 20357
SPRITE MKIV (HAN10)
1969 129 129
1970 1282 1282
TOTAL 1411 1411
AUSTIN SPRITE (AAN10)
1971 1022 1022
MIDGET MKIII (GAN4)
1966 291 17 15 36 359
1967 2853 169 470 4102 260 7854
1968 1790 96 235 4687 464 7272
1969 1726 71 139 4930 64 6930
TOTAL 6660 353 859 13755 788 22415
MIDGET MKIII (GAN5, SQUARE-ARCH)
1969 1196 154 4605 80 6035
1970 3392 3392 10970 208 15106
1971 1657 180 6458 108 8403
TOTAL 6245 870 22033 396 29544
MIDGET MKIII (GAN5, ROUND-ARCH)
1971 430 83 7553 8066
1972 4635 (92 92 11516 16243
1973 3737 10311 14048
1974 1508 8422 9930
TOTAL 10310 175 37802 48287
1974 591 1922 2513
1975 2531 11947 14478
1976 3465 13414 16879
1977 3774 1055 14329
1978 4574 9738 14312
1979 2912 6866 9778
TOTAL 17847 54442 72289
206835
PRODUCTION DATING
DATE CHASSIS NUMBER NOTES
Mar-58 501 First productin Sprite on 31 Mar
Jan-59 8927 First car built in 1959
Jan-60 30215 First car built in 1960
Nov-60 49584 Last fully-assembled Sprite at Abingdon
Jan-61 49821 First car built in 1961 (CKD)
Feb-61 50116 Last CKD (Innocenti) on 16 Feb
SPRITE MIDGET
Feb-61 HAN6-101 Announced 21 May
Mar-61 GAN1-101 Announced 20 Jun
Jan-62 HAN6-12247 GAN1-4526 First cars built in 1962
Oct-62 HAN6-24731 GAN1-16183 Last HAN6/GAN1 cars
Oct-62 HAN7-24732 GAN2-16184 1098cc engine and disc front brakes
Jan-63 HAN7-26622 GAN2-17688 First cars built in 1963
Jan-64 HAN7-37735 GAN2-17688 First cars built in 1964
Mar-64 HAN7-38828 GAN2-25787 Last HAN7/GAN2 CARS
Jan-64 HAN8-38854 GAN3-25825 Production begins
Mar-64 HAN8-38829 GAN3-25788 Sprite and midget jointly announced
Jan-65 HAN8-48873 GAN3-36791 First cars built in 1965
Jan-66 HAN8-57945 GAN3-45860 First cars built in 1966
Sep-66 HAN8-64734 GAN3-52389 Last chassis numbers
Oct-64 YHGN8 Sprite MkIII available in Australia
Aug-65 YHGN9 Sprite MkIIA available in australia
Nov-67 YHGN9 Discontinued
Oct-66 HAN9-64735 GAN4-52390 Production begins
Jan-67 HAN9-64965 GAN4-52798 First cars built in 1967
Mar-67 HAN9-67193 GAN4-54611 Production at Cowley ceases
Jan-68 HAN9-72163 GAN4-60871 First cars built in 1968
Jan-69 HAN9-79236 GAN4-67989 First cars built in 1969
Oct-69 HAN9-85286 GAN4-74885 Final HAN9 and GAN4 versions
Sep-69 HAN10-85287 GAN5-74886 First HAN10 and GAN5 versions
Jan-70 HAN10-85410 GAN5-81049 First cars built in 1970
Aug-70 HAN10-86190 GAN5-88596 Last 1970 model followed by break in numbers
Jun-70 HAN10-86301 GAN5-89501 Numbers resart, first 1791 model
Dec-70 HAN10-86802 Healey name dropped
Jan-71 GAN5-96853 First car built in 1971
Jan-71 AAN10-86803 First Austin Sprite produced on 27 JAN
Jul-71 GAN5-105146 Last 1971 model followed by break in numbers
May-71 GAN5-105501 Numbers restart, first 1972 model on 10 MAY
Jul-71 AAN10-87824 Last Austin Sprite produced on 6 JUL
Jan-72 GAN5-113617 First car built in 1972
Jun-72 GAN5-123644 Last 1972 model followed by break in numbers
Jul-72 GAN5-123731 Numbers restart, first 1973 model on 13 JUL
Jan-73 GAN5-129951 First car built in 1973
Aug-73 GAN5-138753 Last 1973 model followed by break in numbers
Aug-73 GAN5-138801 Numbers restart, first 1974 model on 23 AUG
Jan-74 GAN5-144039 first car built in 1974
Oct-74 GAN5-153920 Last 'round-arch' Midget produced on 17 OCT
Nov-74 15410 First car built on 19 NOV
Jan-75 156670 First car built in 1975
Mar-75 160160 First Californian Midget 1500
Apr-75 162100 Jubilee Edition built on 30 APR
Aug-75 166193 Last 1975 model followed by break in numbers
Aug-75 166301 First 1976 model
Jan-76 171356 First car built in 1976
Jan-76 181663 Last 1976 model followed by break in numbers
Aug-76 182001 First 1976 '1/2' model
Dec-76 187529 Last 1976 '1/2' model followed by break in numbers
Dec-76 188001 First 1977 model built on 14 dec
Jan-77 188820 First car built in 1977
Oct-77 198804 Last 1977 model followed by break in numbers
Aug-77 200001 First 1978 model built on 24 AUG
Jan-78 204350 First car built in 1978
Jun-78 210870 Last 1978 model followed by break in numbers
May-78 212001 First 1979 model built on 9 MAY
Jan-79 219817 First car built in 1979
Oct-79 229001 First of the final black batch built on 3 OCT
Dec-79 229500 Last of the black batch built on 6 DEC
Dec-79 229526 Last Midget produced on 7 DEC,
finished in black and retained by manufacturer

Music of Kings & Queens – full tracklisting

1. ELIZABETH II FANFARE (music)
2. Introduction by Helen Mirren
3. William I introduction by Damian Lewis
4. WILLIAM I (music)
5. Richard I introduction by Helen Mirren
6. RICHARD I (music)
7. Henry VIII introduction by Damian Lewis
8. HENRY VIII (music)
9. Elizabeth I introduction by Helen Mirren
10. ELIZABETH I (music)
11. Charles II introduction by Damian Lewis
12. CHARLES II (music)
13. Anne introduction by Helen Mirren
14. ANNE (music)
15. George II introduction by Damian Lewis
16. GEORGE II (music) Inspired by Handel’s Zadok the Priest
17. George III introduction by Damian Lewis
18. GEORGE III (music)
19. Victoria introduction by Helen Mirren
20. VICTORIA (music)
21. Edward VII -introduction by Helen Mirren
22. EDWARD VII (music)
23. George VI introduction by Damian Lewis
24. GEORGE VI (music)
25. Elizabeth II introduction by Dame Helen Mirren and Damian Lewis
26. ELIZABETH II (music)

Click here to get your copy ofMusic of Kings & Queens.


Majestic II SP-3061 - History

3090 but this cant be right and in never saw something like this.

Very low or max settings i get same fps because of this single thread at 100% whole time.
Do note that Nvida cards do all of their drawcalls via a SOFTWARE BASED scheduler, unlike AMD which does this via a HARDWARE BASED scheduler. This desprepancy can lead to double digit performance limits and high single-thread usage depending on the scenario. This has already been tested by Hardware Unboxed.

This was beneficial in the DX11 days where games were predominantly running on a single or, tops, 2 threads. And as a result Nvidia netted severe gains over their AMD counter parts. This was also the faux reason for their "efficiency", they just loaded up the CPU instead. Now, however, that software scheduler in modern games is their achilles heel, which is the reason why 3090 is only competitive with AMD cards in 4K. Below that, the CPU bottleneck hampers it's performance.

So, on Nvidia cards, at the 100+ fps range, it's not strange to see one core max out to 100%. That is just the Nvidia software scheduler hitting it's peak. This also can't be fixed by the developers, it's purely Nvidia's fault for refusing to revert back to hardware scheduling.

And testing between high and low settings, and it's respective fps, relies on how the developer implemented LOD and geometry scaling. If they have lower-grade assets in the game, and where specifically you're testing. In an open field as illustrated, the amount of geometry will be low, and you will hit the same wall on low as on high. In a city this might be different.

This also completely undermines DLSS scaling lmao. I have no idea why Nvidia didn't fix this. But I guess, fanboys will buy anything they sell. And complain later. Then buy more of their products :D

For me there is always one cpu thread on nearly 100% which prevents 99% gpu usage. It changes sometimes from thread to thread but there is always 1-2 threads max. This with a [email protected] 1440p max settings.


Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

Coast

**Our Ultimate Outsider stamp can be found at the admission desk in the Visitor Center.

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site sits on a marshy point, located off the Ashley River, where a group of English settlers landed in 1670 and established what would become the birthplace of the Carolina colony. Charles Towne Landing introduces visitors to the earliest colonial history of Charleston. Interact with hands-on exhibits in the Visitor Center, talk to knowledgeable staff members, and take an audio tour on the self-guided history trail.

Guests can step aboard and tour the Adventure, Charleston's only 17th-century replica sailing ship, see cannons fired, or take a peek at otters, bears, bison and more at the Animal Forest natural habitat zoo. The grounds also include 80 acres of gardens, with an elegant live oak alley and the Legare Waring House. One of Charleston’s favorite sites for weddings and other special gatherings, the Legare Waring House combines historic charm with unique and flexible space&mdashcome see it for yourself!

Don't forget to check out the other parks in the South Carolina State Parks system. Experience the charm of Colonial South Carolina or consider a hike to the stunning Raven Cliff Falls at Caesars Head State Park!


Majestic II SP-3061 - History

3090 but this cant be right and in never saw something like this.

Very low or max settings i get same fps because of this single thread at 100% whole time.
Do note that Nvida cards do all of their drawcalls via a SOFTWARE BASED scheduler, unlike AMD which does this via a HARDWARE BASED scheduler. This desprepancy can lead to double digit performance limits and high single-thread usage depending on the scenario. This has already been tested by Hardware Unboxed.

This was beneficial in the DX11 days where games were predominantly running on a single or, tops, 2 threads. And as a result Nvidia netted severe gains over their AMD counter parts. This was also the faux reason for their "efficiency", they just loaded up the CPU instead. Now, however, that software scheduler in modern games is their achilles heel, which is the reason why 3090 is only competitive with AMD cards in 4K. Below that, the CPU bottleneck hampers it's performance.

So, on Nvidia cards, at the 100+ fps range, it's not strange to see one core max out to 100%. That is just the Nvidia software scheduler hitting it's peak. This also can't be fixed by the developers, it's purely Nvidia's fault for refusing to revert back to hardware scheduling.

And testing between high and low settings, and it's respective fps, relies on how the developer implemented LOD and geometry scaling. If they have lower-grade assets in the game, and where specifically you're testing. In an open field as illustrated, the amount of geometry will be low, and you will hit the same wall on low as on high. In a city this might be different.

This also completely undermines DLSS scaling lmao. I have no idea why Nvidia didn't fix this. But I guess, fanboys will buy anything they sell. And complain later. Then buy more of their products :D

For me there is always one cpu thread on nearly 100% which prevents 99% gpu usage. It changes sometimes from thread to thread but there is always 1-2 threads max. This with a [email protected] 1440p max settings.


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Watch the video: ЛУЧШАЯ РАБОТА на MAJESTIC RP! САМАЯ ПРОСТАЯ И ПРИБЫЛЬНАЯ РАБОТА НА СЕРВЕРЕ