Kajeruna SP-389 - History

Kajeruna SP-389 - History


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Kajeruna

A former name retained.

SP-389: t. 147; 1. 153'; b. 14'6" ; dr. 7'9"; s. 14 k.; a. 2 6-pdrs., 1 mg.)

Kajeruna (SP-398), a steel-hulled steam yacht, was built in 1902 by John N. Robinton & Son, Erie Basin, N.Y., and was acquired from her owner, A. W. Gieske of Baltimore, in May 1917 and commissioned, Lt. J. R. Hudgins, USNRF, in command.

Assigned to the 5th Naval District based at Norfolk, Kajeruna acted as flagship for Patrol Squadron 3. She operated in Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay until being returned to her owner 16 January 1919.


Kajeruna SP-389 - History

The steam yacht Hauoli was built in 1902 by Robins Dry Dock & Repair Company, Brooklyn, New York, for mining magnate Francis Marion "Borax" Smith. The yacht was launched 31 May 1902 at John N. Robbins' shipyard, Erie Basin, Brooklyn, New York with Miss Lulu Pfizer christening the vessel Hauoli as the Hawaiian word for "delight" in the presence of Mr. Smith's business manager and several hundred friends. On registration Hauoli was assigned the official number 96634 with call letters KRTJ with home port being New York.

The first Hauoli was assigned the, official number 96634 with call letters KRTJ. That first yacht was launched 30 May 1902 at John N. Robbins' shipyard, Erie Basin, Brooklyn, New York with Miss Lulu Pfizer christening the vessel. That yacht is described as being with a 147 ft length overall, 14 ft beam and 6 ft draft. It had two twenty-two foot deck houses placed fore and aft of the machinery space that had funnel and ventilators visible between the houses and an open bridge above the forward deck house. It is described as having two boilers. This vessel is shown in Lloyd's Register of American Yachts for 1905 — 6 as being owned by John N. Robins, the builder, and renamed Seminole. This yacht became.

Before demobilization cut short the experiments with Hauoli, it was withdrawn from that service and decommissioned 8 October 1919, and later sold to Denton Shore Lumber Co., Tampa, Florida, 7 September 1920.

The yacht was transferred to special duty 28 January 1919, and assigned to the experimental use of Thomas A. Edison for ASW (antisubmarine warfare) studies. Edison installed listening devices in Hauoli and carried out tests in and around New York harbor.

The second Hauoli, registered with official number 96694 and signal letters KSNM, was also designed by Henry J. Gielow and built for Smith by the Robins Dry Dock & Repair Company in 1903. This yacht is shown with registered specifications of with a 211 ft length overall, 22 ft beam and 8 ft draft and having four Almy boilers providing steam for a four-cylinder, triple expansion engine built by J. W. Sullivan of New York was taken in for Navy service in 1917 as.

Four Almy water tube boilers provided steam for a four cylinder, triple expansion engine built by J. W. Sullivan of New York with a high pressure cylinder of 17 in, a medium of 26.5 in and two low pressure cylinders of 30 in with a 21 in stroke. During a four hour trial Hauoli averaged 18 knots and under forced draft made better than 21 knots. The Navy rated the vessel's top speed at 19 knots, cruising speed at 15 knots with a 750 nmi cruising endurance. Though losing narrowly in the Lysistrata Cup race on 18 June 1904 to a twin screw yacht, Hauoli was considered fast and was perhaps the fastest single screw yacht of her class in the world. Electric lighting and ventilation was installed and among the vessels small boats was a 20 ft electric launch. The other boats were a 20 ft gig, a 16 ft cutter and 15 ft dinghy.

Lloyd's Register of American Yachts for 1905 — 6 shows the first Haouli as renamed Seminole and being owned by John N. Robins, the builder. In an October 1911 advertisement by the designing firm, Gielow & Orr, the yacht is for sale as Hauoli. Seminole is shown in registers as owned by Robins until the 30 June 1910 Annual List of Merchant Vessels of the United States when the vessel is shown as Kajeruna. By June 1911 the register shows Kajeruna with Clinton W. Kinsella of New York as owner. Some confusion about owner's names may be caused by news reports of F. E. Kinsella, possibly related, with a racing motorboat at the same time with the name Kajeruna. By December 1916 the yacht had been purchased by Alfred W. Gieske of Baltimore and the yacht was then associated with the Baltimore Yacht Club.

In 1912 the yacht was sold to Mrs. Clara Baldwin Stocker, daughter of Elias Jackson "Lucky" Baldwin, and went into the yard for a refit that included fitting of a turtle deck forward. The yacht was renamed California with a new home port at Mrs. Stocker's home in Los Angeles. Mrs. Stocker was a colorful heiress determined to "spend a million or two to have a really good time" with an estimated $24,000,000 to spend. Among other acquisitions was a private railway car, named "California," and "I believe I just about bought Tiffiany out" in diamonds. She stated she could not quite remember from whom she bought Hauoli but she was going to rename the yacht California because the state was "delight enough for me" though she was going to have to wait until the Panama Canal was opened to bring the yacht from the Atlantic. The yacht left the fitting out yard on 28 July 1914 for New York, then from there on 1 August for California by the Panama Canal. On 1 October 1914 California arrived at Los Angeles after being the first pleasure vessel to transit the canal.

Forward of the machinery space and bulkhead was the full galley with a dumbwaiter connecting it to the smaller galley above. Forward of the galley, on the starboard side, was a room for five Japanese servants. On the port side was the stairway to the deck above, storeroom and engineers stateroom. Next forward was the officers mess room with a stateroom for the assistant engineer and mate and officer's bathroom to starboard. Two staterooms, one for cook, steward and waiter and the other for petty officers lay between the officer's mess and the forecastle where there were hammock berths for twelve men in a space 13 ft long. Hot and cold running water was provided in all living areas and baths had both fresh and salt water taps.

Assigned to the 5th Naval District and based at Norfolk, Virginia, Kajeruna served as flagship of Patrol Squadron 3. The vessel was one of eight assigned mine sweeping duties in the 5th District, routinely sweeping the designated channels for ship entry and egress. She operated in Hampton Roads and the Chesapeake Bay for the remainder of World War I.

Haouli was a single funnel, two masted, schooner rigged yacht with registered specifications of, 203 net tons, with a 211 ft length overall, 166 ft waterline length, 22 ft beam and 8 ft draft. The registered length of 176 ft is comparable with the Navy's 179 ft in contemporary data as precise measuring methods differ. The Navy gave a displacement tonnage of 285 tons in 1918 data. The least freeboard was 5 ft with a flush deck. The hull had four watertight bulkheads and double bottom suitable for ballast or fresh water storage.

In May 1917, the U.S. Navy acquired Kajeruna from her owner, A. W. Gieske of Baltimore, Maryland, under free lease for use as a patrol vessel during World War I. She was commissioned that month as USS Kajeruna (SP-389) with Lieutenant J. R. Hudgins, USNRF, in command.

Forward of the owner's quarters and the aft deckhouse was the machinery space with the other habitable parts of the vessel forward of that space. Just forward was the galley occupying the full width of the yacht. A refrigerator and cold storage occupied the port side of the galley while with the food preparation area and dumb waiter were starboard and the large stove placed amidships at the aft bulkhead. Forward of the galley were staterooms flanking a short passageway for the yacht's captain on the starboard side and the engineer to the port side. Forward of those was berthing for a crew of ten with three bunk tiers to starboard and two to port. A toilet occupied space forward on the port side. Forward of the toilet and bunks was a two-person stateroom for the stewards.

California was fitted with two six pounder guns and two machine guns and had a crew of sixty total, including five officers. Navy inspection found a maximum speed of 19 knots, cruising speed of 15 knots with a cruising endurance of 750 nmi.

The yacht was a second Hauoli built in 1903, replacing one of the same name built in 1902, for mining magnate Francis Marion "Borax" Smith. This second Hauoli was notable for speed, described as perhaps the fastest single screw yacht of its class in the world. In 1912 the yacht was sold to Clara Baldwin Stocker, an heiress residing in Los Angeles, who renamed the yacht California. She had to await the opening of the Panama Canal to bring the yacht to her residence. It was noted as the first pleasure vessel to transit the canal. The yacht was home ported in Los Angeles. At some point, either prior to or upon the Navy's acquisition, the yacht was brought back to New York. After naval service, the yacht was sold to a company in Tampa, Florida.

The second Hauoli, registered with official number 96694 and signal letters KSNM, was also designed by Henry J. Gielow and built for Smith by the Robins Dry Dock & Repair Company in 1903. It is this yacht that became California and then the naval vessel.

About a quarter of the way between the aft deck house and stern was the companionway giving access to the staterooms occupied by the owner and his wife that lay forward immediately aft the machinery space bulkhead. That steel bulkhead was double with asbestos insulation in the form of interior bulkheads with air space between to reduce noise to the owner's spaces. Between those and the companionway, going aft, lay a large stateroom and bath on the starboard side. Opposite those were two portside staterooms. Aft of the staterooms was the main saloon with direct access to the afterdeck by the companionway. Water storage tanks flanked the companionway.

California was purchased by the Navy for $65,000 in August 1917 from her owner, Clara Baldwin Stocker, of Los Angeles. After fitting out the vessel commissioned as USS California at New York Navy Yard 24 December 1917, Lt. (j.g.) W. Applebye-Robinson, USNRF, commanding. The name was changed back to the original Hauoli 18 February 1918.

The forward part of the aft house contained a 14 ft by 6 ft dressing room with lavatory and toilet with access either from the deck or from the 13 ft by 18 ft deck stateroom lying between the dressing room and social room. The social room was 22 ft with a piano, desk, seating and a stairway to the passageway on the deck below. That lower deck contained seven large staterooms, three toilets, two with bath. The forward two staterooms were each 13 ft by 10 ft with a connecting bathroom and lay against the aft machinery space bulkhead which was steel with asbestos bulkheads and air spaces between that ant the wooden bulkhead for the living spaces.

Two twenty-two foot in length deck houses were placed fore and aft of the machinery space that was topped by a single stack and ventilators. A dining saloon with a table seating for up to fourteen people occupied the forward portion of the forward deck house. The open navigating bridge was atop the deck house. A butler's pantry was fitted in the after portion and connected to the galley on the deck below by a dumb waiter. The aft deck house had a piano, large sofas on each side with a folding berth on the partition between the main space and a forward portion devoted to a dressing room and lavatory with toilet. That space could be entered from either the lounge or the deck.


Kajeruna SP-389 - History

As of 16 March 2015, New Zealand's GCSB agency had a secret listening post, codenamed "Caprica", at the New Zealand High Commission in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The "Caprica" outpost was reportedly modeled after the NSA's Stateroom outposts at selected United States embassies across the world.

Damien Rogers, former senior adviser to the New Zealand intelligence agency Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) said he was surprised to hear that the "Stateroom" codeword and location of associated sites are being published in the media, because such revelations would cause "anxiety and concern" for the directors of the five intelligence agencies of the UKUSA Agreement. Nicky Hager, a New Zealand investigative journalist who exposed the ECHELON surveillance system, confirmed that such surveillance operations have been conducted by the intelligence agencies of the Five Eyes for quite some time.

This continues until Fiorello and Tomasso each have ordered about a dozen hard-boiled eggs and Driftwood has ordered about everything else&mdashincluding coffee to sober up some stewed prunes. This is just a set-up for the famous "Stateroom Scene", in which a total of 15 people crowd into Driftwood's tiny cabin.

According to documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the true mission of Stateroom personnel is generally not revealed to the rest of the diplomatic staff at the facilities where they are assigned.

In almost a hundred U.S. embassies and consulates worldwide, Stateroom operations are conducted by the Special Collection Service (SCS), a unit that is jointly operated by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the National Security Agency (NSA).

STATEROOM is the code name of a highly secretive signals intelligence collection program involving the interception of international radio, telecommunications and internet traffic. It is operated out of the diplomatic missions of the signatories to the UKUSA Agreement and the members of the ECHELON network including Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canada and the United States.

The existence of Stateroom was revealed in October 2013 by the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who initiated the global surveillance disclosure.

- Excerpt from the NSA's STATEROOM Guide

The staterooms, which were mostly on two decks, called the "awning" and the "shade" decks, had sliding windows, and were paneled in oak. Each stateroom had running water, in some cases both hot and cold which was considered relatively luxurious at the time. Some staterooms had an extra folding bed, called a "cabinet bed" which doubled for use as a day-time settee. There was an observation room with large windows on the forward end of the top deck, and on the aft end of the same deck there was a ladies saloon. There was also a separate smoking room on the upper deck, and a dining saloon on the main deck.

Later on an elderly woman (Gloria Stuart) watches Lovett's discovery on the news and immediately contacts the salvage team. Claiming to be both the woman in the picture and Rose Dewitt Bukater she is immediately flown out to Lovett's salvage ship. Rose requests to view the recovered drawing and Lovett shows her some artifacts salvaged from the wreck, specifically those recovered from her stateroom on Titanic. During this scene Lovett reveals the origins of the diamond and that if it is recovered the Heart of the Ocean would be worth more than the Hope Diamond. While examining an ornate butterfly comb, Rose becomes emotional and begins detailing her time aboard the Titanic. During the film the audience's perspective alternates between the past and present as Rose shares her memories. Rose divulges the intimate details of her relationship with the artist of the drawing, Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio), which leads up to the night of the sinking.

When the BX was completed, she had three decks, with stateroom accommodation for 70 passengers and could also carry another 60 deck passengers. The staterooms featured steam heat, hot and cold running water, fine quality bedding and attractive wall and floor coverings. Her dining room could seat 50 and was lavishly furnished, right down to the plates, which were specially ordered from England and monogrammed in the BX Company's colors: red, yellow and white. Off the ladies cabin above the covered paddlewheel a bridal chamber was built, which contained, among other luxuries, a double brass bed and a silk eiderdown worth $150. Many dignitaries, including Premier Richard McBride would travel in the comfort of this sumptuous suite.

Viking Star has five stateroom categories, all with private verandas, and 14 Explorer Suites. Up to 930 passengers can be accommodated in her 465 staterooms and suites, all of which are spacious for a cruise ship. The smallest staterooms are 25 m2 in size the two-room suites range from 70.3 m2 to 134.5 m2 in area, and feature wrap-around private balconies offering sweeping views.

Modifications were made to Joseph Hewes and subsequent ships of the class. The primary differences were slightly different arrangement of the "Officer's Country" staterooms with additional staterooms in the 01 level instead of the open deck between the boat decks. The stateroom on the port side under the bridge was designated as a "flag" stateroom, with additional staterooms for flag staff when serving as a flagship. These ships have been referred to as the Joseph Hewes-sub-class

Forward of the owner's quarters and the aft deckhouse was the machinery space with the other habitable parts of the vessel forward of that space. Just forward was the galley occupying the full width of the yacht. A refrigerator and cold storage occupied the port side of the galley while with the food preparation area and dumb waiter were starboard and the large stove placed amidships at the aft bulkhead. Forward of the galley were staterooms flanking a short passageway for the yacht's captain on the starboard side and the engineer to the port side. Forward of those was berthing for a crew of ten with three bunk tiers to starboard and two to port. A toilet occupied space forward on the port side. Forward of the toilet and bunks was a two-person stateroom for the stewards.

Emerald Princess had a power outage on July 25, 2010 on the first day of a seven-day Eastern Caribbean cruise. For extended periods during the 4+ hour outage, there was no air conditioning, no elevator service, limited lighting, and toilets could not flush. As a result of the outage, Emerald Princess missed its first port of call the following day. Passengers were credited US$300 per stateroom for the inconvenience. Princess Cruises has not yet determined the cause of the outage.

Le Lyrial has 122 cabins and suites. All of them have sea views, and 94 percent feature a private balcony. An entire deck of the ship is devoted solely to suites, some of which larger than those on the vessel's three older sister ships. Even Le Lyrials lowest-category Superior Stateroom is 21 m2 in area Deluxe Staterooms have an area of 19 m2 and a 4 m2 balcony.

Prince George was 350 ft long, with a beam of 52.1 ft and a depth of hold of 17.7 ft. The overall size of the vessel was 5,812 tons. Prince George had accommodations for 322 passengers, all but 28 of which were considered first class. Each stateroom had fold-away bunks to allow it to be converted into a sitting room. There were several deluxe suites and also a children's playroom.

Deck A: Contains 6 cabins of Category D (5-7m²), (5 outside cabins (2 to port 3 on the starboard side) and 1 inside cabin), 2 Category J cabins - 7-13m² (1 each port and starboard) - with a bathroom, and 1 Outside Stateroom (starboard) of category N - 7-13m², with bathroom. Deck A also has the front desk/reception.

In July 2018, Sun Princess underwent a two-week dry dock. She received new livery design, new stateroom category, shops, and other onboard amenities.

After World War II, the line promoted its automobile service to Florida-bound motorists, advertising the elimination of 230 mi of driving by taking the family car on an overnight cruise down the Chesapeake to Virginia, while enjoying a sumptuous dinner and relaxing stateroom aboard an Old Bay Line steamer instead of a roadside motel. In March 1946, the Old Bay Line installed radar on the City of Richmond and City of Norfolk, the first commercial passenger ships to be equipped with radar.


Kajeruna SP-389 - History

Ventilators come in many different styles and method of giving a breath to sustain life. There are manual ventilators such as bag valve masks and anesthesia bags that require the users to hold the ventilator to the face or to an artificial airway and maintain breaths with their hands. Mechanical ventilators are ventilators not requiring operator effort and are typically computer-controlled or pneumatic-controlled.

The Institute supports research programs that study debilitating pulmonary disorders and provides pulmonary rehabilitation at academic and medical centers across the country and provides neonatal ventilators to needy hospitals so not one baby suffers or dies because of the lack of a proper ventilation system. For over 30 years, the Will Rogers Institute has been a leader in health-related public service announcements that appear on movie screens and television and heard on radio stations across the United States and provides free health booklets and materials.

Transtracheal jet ventilation refers to a type of high-frequency ventilation, low tidal volume ventilation provided via a laryngeal catheter by specialized ventilators that are usually only available in the operating room or intensive care unit. This procedure is occasionally employed in the operating room when a difficult airway is anticipated. Such as Treacher Collins syndrome, Robin sequence, head and neck surgery with supraglottic or glottic obstruction).

Compared to conventional mechanical ventilators that cost around 2.5 Million Indian Rupees (upwards of $20,000), the Super Ventilator costs just 25,000 Indian Rupees, making it affordable by all hospitals and villages. Also, conventional ventilators are often too complex and fragile for use in harsh rural environments. The goal of the device is "one ventilator per bed" in every hospital.

Most sharks and rays have five pairs of gill slits, but a few species have 6 or 7 pairs. Shark gill slits lie in a row behind the head. The anterior edge of a gill slit is motile, moving outward to allow water to exit, but closing to prevent reverse flow. A modified slit, called a spiracle, lies just behind the eye, which assists the shark with taking in water during respiration and plays a major role in bottom–dwelling sharks. Spiracles are reduced or missing in active pelagic sharks. While the shark is moving, water passes through the mouth and over the gills in a process known as "ram ventilation". While at rest, most sharks pump water over their gills to ensure a constant supply of oxygenated water. A small number of species have lost the ability to pump water through their gills and must swim without rest. These species are obligate ram ventilators and would presumably asphyxiate if unable to move. Obligate ram ventilation is also true of some pelagic bony fish species.

Other superficial changes to this version include an upright funnel and pressurized boiler rooms which eliminated the need for hooded ventilators around the base of the funnel. This changes the silhouette of the corvette and made it more difficult for submariners to tell which way the corvette was laying.

James Barnet was the architect responsible for the project and his design was clearly based on Greenway's original, a mark of the respect held for Greenway's work. Although the building is seen as a replica of Greenway's design, Barnet incorporated other changes in the appearance of the building, particularly in the proportions of the elements, and, notably, in the larger domes and ventilators over the side wings and the projecting gallery of bluestone at the top of the tower. The light commenced operation in 1883 and had a range of twenty five nautical miles. The technology used in this lighthouse (it was one of the first electrically powered lighthouses in the world) was such that a higher level of expertise in the maintenance was required and hence a larger number of staff. This led to the construction in 1881 of two semidetached cottages for the assistants to the Head Keeper. In 1885 new quarters were built for the Engineer and his assistant.

Hauoli was designed by Henry J. Gielow and built under his direct supervision. The hull was divided into four water tight compartments and was double bottomed with those bottom spaces capable of either fresh water storage or water ballasting. That yacht is described as being with a 147 ft length overall, 14 ft beam and 6 ft draft. It had two twenty-two foot deck houses placed fore and aft of the machinery space that had funnel and ventilators visible between the houses and an open bridge above the forward deck house. It is described as having two boilers.

The locomotives have a maximum power output of 5880 kW, and are capable of a continual power output of 5400 kW. This gives a maximum speed of 200 km/h and a tractive effort of 275 kN. The locomotive is fed power from the pantograph. This is then converted to direct current before being converted to three-phase electricity through one of three gate turn-off thyristors. Each bogie has three rectifiers, each connected to a transformer that is again connected to two inverters. The motors are three-phase asynchronous motors located in the bogie frame and equipped with regenerative brakes. There is also an auxiliary three-phase power supply which powers the compressor, pumps, ventilators and other auxiliary equipment, operated by four separate inverters. The controller is a 16-bit microprocessor that communicates using optical fibre cables. The rectifier, auxiliary rectifiers, controllers and the error and diagnostic system is of the same type as used on the NSB Class 70 multiple units.

He shows me two tall pillars that stand amidst a colourful but dirty market. They are called Sawan Bhadon. The locals say that they stand for two brothers who meet everyday at midnight. And I hear this version as well. Bagh Raj, son of Bir Singh Deo, met a seer during a hunting expedition. The seer, who was observing a vow of silence, was quiet when the prince asked him about a particular kill he was chasing. But the prince misunderstood the silence and went in the wrong direction. After a long frustrating day, he ordered the seer to be killed instead. The just king in return ordered the death of the prince. If you still believe that these pillars stand for the seer and the prince, then think again. Only my guide book offers a plausible connection that these could be ventilators of an underground chamber for the army. They actually look like tall chimney vents to me.

The c. 1912 work is thought to be that of Reginald Marks, who from 1910-1917 worked with his father, James and brother, Harry. Reginald Marks is believed to have been responsible for the Taylor Building and Gaydon's Building in Toowoomba. Marks's building had a deep covered verandah which ran the length of the Ruthven Street elevation. Similar to the facade, it was ornately detailed. In common with many other Marks buildings it used ventilators designed by Harry Marks. Other substantial alterations to an earlier building appear to have been undertaken contemporaneously with the facade. Differences in ceiling treatments, some windows, chimneys, and detailing suggest that both wings of the hotel were remodelled at this time.

Nagarjuna Hospital has automatic blood counters, auto-analyzers, state-of-the-art X-ray and ultrasound equipment, and double-balloon enteroscopes, as well as digital and magnification endoscopes, trans-nasal endoscopes, and a range of ultrasound endoscopes. It is also equipped with a dual-slice sub-second CT scanner and six advanced mechanical ventilators with invasive monitoring facility. The operation theatres are equipped with Swiss lights and anesthesia machines.

A bag valve mask, abbreviated to BVM and sometimes known by the proprietary name Ambu bag or generically as a manual resuscitator or "self-inflating bag", is a hand-held device commonly used to provide positive pressure ventilation to patients who are not breathing or not breathing adequately. The device is a required part of resuscitation kits for trained professionals in out-of-hospital settings (such as ambulance crews) and is also frequently used in hospitals as part of standard equipment found on a crash cart, in emergency rooms or other critical care settings. Underscoring the frequency and prominence of BVM use in the United States, the American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care recommend that "all healthcare providers should be familiar with the use of the bag-mask device." Manual resuscitators are also used within the hospital for temporary ventilation of patients dependent on mechanical ventilators when the mechanical ventilator needs to be examined for possible malfunction or when ventilator-dependent patients are transported within the hospital. Two principal types of manual resuscitators exist one version is self-filling with air, although additional oxygen (O 2 ) can be added but is not necessary for the device to function. The other principal type of manual resuscitator (flow-inflation) is heavily used in non-emergency applications in the operating room to ventilate patients during anesthesia induction and recovery.

The United Kingdom (UK) criteria were first published by the Conference of Medical Royal Colleges (with advice from the Transplant Advisory Panel) in 1976, as prognostic guidelines. They were drafted in response to a perceived need for guidance in the management of deeply comatose patients with severe brain damage who were being kept alive by mechanical ventilators but showing no signs of recovery. The Conference sought "to establish diagnostic criteria of such rigour that on their fulfilment the mechanical ventilator can be switched off, in the secure knowledge that there is no possible chance of recovery". The published criteria—negative responses to bedside tests of some reflexes with pathways through the brainstem and a specified challenge to the brainstem respiratory centre, with caveats about exclusion of endocrine influences, metabolic factors and drug effects—were held to be "sufficient to distinguish between those patients who retain the functional capacity to have a chance of even partial recovery and those where no such possibility exists". Recognition of that state required the withdrawal of fruitless further artificial support so that death might be allowed to occur, thus "sparing relatives from the further emotional trauma of sterile hope".

The court house has a timber frame and is clad with vertical corrugated iron. The gabled roof is also clad with corrugated iron. A verandah with a separate awning supported on posts runs around three sides of the court room. The main entrance is central and approached by low steps. Behind the court room and set at right angles to it are a series of 3 gabled sections containing offices. They are similar in form and set parallel to each other. The first two sections are separated from each other by a corridor roofed in curved corrugated iron and have a verandah to the rear. Behind this are a pair of offices with a space between them which allows entry to the rear verandah. Windows in the end walls have sun hoods and ventilation has been addressed by providing louvred panels in the upper section of end walls and ventilators on the roof.

The Mirani Railway Station is a single storey, timber framed building, set on low timber stumps, clad with timber weatherboards. The building has a gable roof clad with corrugated iron. Timber louvered ventilators are located high in the western and eastern elevations. The roof extends on both the northern and southern sides of the building creating shade to these sides.

All three ventilators are thought to have been constructed in accordance with the patented Monier ventilation system for venting public sewers and drains, and probably pre-cast in an hexagonal mould, with the top face open.

Most modern ventilators have basic monitoring tools. There are also monitors that work independently of the ventilator which allow for measuring patients after the ventilator has been removed, such as a T tube test.

Above the public hall is a long gabled roof of corrugated iron with tall galvanised ventilators along the crown.


§ 19.2-389. (Effective January 1, 2021 and until July 1, 2021) Dissemination of criminal history record information.

A. Criminal history record information shall be disseminated, whether directly or through an intermediary, only to:

1. Authorized officers or employees of criminal justice agencies, as defined by § 9.1-101, for purposes of the administration of criminal justice and the screening of an employment application or review of employment by a criminal justice agency with respect to its own employees or applicants, and dissemination to the Virginia Parole Board, pursuant to this subdivision, of such information on all state-responsible inmates for the purpose of making parole determinations pursuant to subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 of § 53.1-136 shall include collective dissemination by electronic means every 30 days. For purposes of this subdivision, criminal history record information includes information sent to the Central Criminal Records Exchange pursuant to §§ 37.2-819 and 64.2-2014 when disseminated to any full-time or part-time employee of the State Police, a police department or sheriff's office that is a part of or administered by the Commonwealth or any political subdivision thereof, and who is responsible for the prevention and detection of crime and the enforcement of the penal, traffic or highway laws of the Commonwealth for the purposes of the administration of criminal justice

2. Such other individuals and agencies that require criminal history record information to implement a state or federal statute or executive order of the President of the United States or Governor that expressly refers to criminal conduct and contains requirements or exclusions expressly based upon such conduct, except that information concerning the arrest of an individual may not be disseminated to a noncriminal justice agency or individual if an interval of one year has elapsed from the date of the arrest and no disposition of the charge has been recorded and no active prosecution of the charge is pending

3. Individuals and agencies pursuant to a specific agreement with a criminal justice agency to provide services required for the administration of criminal justice pursuant to that agreement which shall specifically authorize access to data, limit the use of data to purposes for which given, and ensure the security and confidentiality of the data

4. Individuals and agencies for the express purpose of research, evaluative, or statistical activities pursuant to an agreement with a criminal justice agency that shall specifically authorize access to data, limit the use of data to research, evaluative, or statistical purposes, and ensure the confidentiality and security of the data

5. Agencies of state or federal government that are authorized by state or federal statute or executive order of the President of the United States or Governor to conduct investigations determining employment suitability or eligibility for security clearances allowing access to classified information

6. Individuals and agencies where authorized by court order or court rule

7. Agencies of any political subdivision of the Commonwealth, public transportation companies owned, operated or controlled by any political subdivision, and any public service corporation that operates a public transit system owned by a local government for the conduct of investigations of applicants for employment, permit, or license whenever, in the interest of public welfare or safety, it is necessary to determine under a duly enacted ordinance if the past criminal conduct of a person with a conviction record would be compatible with the nature of the employment, permit, or license under consideration

7a. Commissions created pursuant to the Transportation District Act of 1964 (§ 33.2-1900 et seq.) of Title 33.2 and their contractors, for the conduct of investigations of individuals who have been offered a position of employment whenever, in the interest of public welfare or safety and as authorized in the Transportation District Act of 1964, it is necessary to determine if the past criminal conduct of a person with a conviction record would be compatible with the nature of the employment under consideration

8. Public or private agencies when authorized or required by federal or state law or interstate compact to investigate (i) applicants for foster or adoptive parenthood or (ii) any individual, and the adult members of that individual's household, with whom the agency is considering placing a child or from whom the agency is considering removing a child due to abuse or neglect, on an emergency, temporary, or permanent basis pursuant to §§ 63.2-901.1 and 63.2-1505, subject to the restriction that the data shall not be further disseminated to any party other than a federal or state authority or court as may be required to comply with an express requirement of law

9. To the extent permitted by federal law or regulation, public service companies as defined in § 56-1, for the conduct of investigations of applicants for employment when such employment involves personal contact with the public or when past criminal conduct of an applicant would be incompatible with the nature of the employment under consideration

10. The appropriate authority for purposes of granting citizenship and for purposes of international travel, including, but not limited to, issuing visas and passports

11. A person requesting a copy of his own criminal history record information as defined in § 9.1-101 at his cost, except that criminal history record information shall be supplied at no charge to a person who has applied to be a volunteer with (i) a Virginia affiliate of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America (ii) a volunteer fire company (iii) the Volunteer Emergency Families for Children (iv) any affiliate of Prevent Child Abuse, Virginia (v) any Virginia affiliate of Compeer or (vi) any board member or any individual who has been offered membership on the board of a Crime Stoppers, Crime Solvers or Crime Line program as defined in § 15.2-1713.1

12. Administrators and board presidents of and applicants for licensure or registration as a child welfare agency as defined in § 63.2-100 for dissemination to the Commissioner of Social Services' representative pursuant to § 63.2-1702 for the conduct of investigations with respect to employees of and volunteers at such facilities, caretakers, and other adults living in family day homes or homes approved by family day systems, and foster and adoptive parent applicants of private child-placing agencies, pursuant to §§ 63.2-1719, 63.2-1720, 63.2-1720.1, 63.2-1721, and 63.2-1721.1, subject to the restriction that the data shall not be further disseminated by the facility or agency to any party other than the data subject, the Commissioner of Social Services' representative or a federal or state authority or court as may be required to comply with an express requirement of law for such further dissemination

13. The school boards of the Commonwealth for the purpose of screening individuals who are offered or who accept public school employment and those current school board employees for whom a report of arrest has been made pursuant to § 19.2-83.1

14. The Virginia Lottery for the conduct of investigations as set forth in the Virginia Lottery Law (§ 58.1-4000 et seq.) and casino gaming as set forth in Chapter 41 (§ 58.1-4100 et seq.) of Title 58.1, and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services for the conduct of investigations as set forth in Article 1.1:1 (§ 18.2-340.15 et seq.) of Chapter 8 of Title 18.2

15. Licensed nursing homes, hospitals and home care organizations for the conduct of investigations of applicants for compensated employment in licensed nursing homes pursuant to § 32.1-126.01, hospital pharmacies pursuant to § 32.1-126.02, and home care organizations pursuant to § 32.1-162.9:1, subject to the limitations set out in subsection E

16. Licensed assisted living facilities and licensed adult day care centers for the conduct of investigations of applicants for compensated employment in licensed assisted living facilities and licensed adult day care centers pursuant to § 63.2-1720, subject to the limitations set out in subsection F

17. The Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority for the conduct of investigations as set forth in § 4.1-103.1

18. The State Board of Elections and authorized officers and employees thereof and general registrars appointed pursuant to § 24.2-110 in the course of conducting necessary investigations with respect to voter registration, limited to any record of felony convictions

19. The Commissioner of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services for those individuals who are committed to the custody of the Commissioner pursuant to §§ 19.2-169.2, 19.2-169.6, 19.2-182.2, 19.2-182.3, 19.2-182.8, and 19.2-182.9 for the purpose of placement, evaluation, and treatment planning

20. Any alcohol safety action program certified by the Commission on the Virginia Alcohol Safety Action Program for (i) assessments of habitual offenders under § 46.2-360, (ii) interventions with first offenders under § 18.2-251, or (iii) services to offenders under § 18.2-51.4, 18.2-266, or 18.2-266.1

21. Residential facilities for juveniles regulated or operated by the Department of Social Services, the Department of Education, or the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services for the purpose of determining applicants' fitness for employment or for providing volunteer or contractual services

22. The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and facilities operated by the Department for the purpose of determining an individual's fitness for employment pursuant to departmental instructions

23. Pursuant to § 22.1-296.3, the governing boards or administrators of private elementary or secondary schools which are accredited pursuant to § 22.1-19 or a private organization coordinating such records information on behalf of such governing boards or administrators pursuant to a written agreement with the Department of State Police

24. Public institutions of higher education and nonprofit private institutions of higher education for the purpose of screening individuals who are offered or accept employment

25. Members of a threat assessment team established by a local school board pursuant to § 22.1-79.4, by a public institution of higher education pursuant to § 23.1-805, or by a private nonprofit institution of higher education, for the purpose of assessing or intervening with an individual whose behavior may present a threat to safety however, no member of a threat assessment team shall redisclose any criminal history record information obtained pursuant to this section or otherwise use any record of an individual beyond the purpose that such disclosure was made to the threat assessment team

26. Executive directors of community services boards or the personnel director serving the community services board for the purpose of determining an individual's fitness for employment, approval as a sponsored residential service provider, or permission to enter into a shared living arrangement with a person receiving medical assistance services pursuant to a waiver pursuant to §§ 37.2-506 and 37.2-607

27. Executive directors of behavioral health authorities as defined in § 37.2-600 for the purpose of determining an individual's fitness for employment, approval as a sponsored residential service provider, or permission to enter into a shared living arrangement with a person receiving medical assistance services pursuant to a waiver pursuant to §§ 37.2-506 and 37.2-607

28. The Commissioner of Social Services for the purpose of locating persons who owe child support or who are alleged in a pending paternity proceeding to be a putative father, provided that only the name, address, demographics and social security number of the data subject shall be released

29. Authorized officers or directors of agencies licensed pursuant to Article 2 (§ 37.2-403 et seq.) of Chapter 4 of Title 37.2 by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services for the purpose of determining if any applicant who accepts employment in any direct care position or requests approval as a sponsored residential service provider or permission to enter into a shared living arrangement with a person receiving medical assistance services pursuant to a waiver has been convicted of a crime that affects his fitness to have responsibility for the safety and well-being of individuals with mental illness, intellectual disability, or substance abuse pursuant to §§ 37.2-416, 37.2-506, and 37.2-607

30. The Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles, for the purpose of evaluating applicants for and holders of a motor carrier certificate or license subject to the provisions of Chapters 20 (§ 46.2-2000 et seq.) and 21 (§ 46.2-2100 et seq.) of Title 46.2

31. The chairmen of the Committees for Courts of Justice of the Senate or the House of Delegates for the purpose of determining if any person being considered for election to any judgeship has been convicted of a crime

32. Heads of state agencies in which positions have been identified as sensitive for the purpose of determining an individual's fitness for employment in positions designated as sensitive under Department of Human Resource Management policies developed pursuant to § 2.2-1201.1

33. The Office of the Attorney General, for all criminal justice activities otherwise permitted under subdivision A 1 and for purposes of performing duties required by the Civil Commitment of Sexually Violent Predators Act (§ 37.2-900 et seq.)

34. Shipyards, to the extent permitted by federal law or regulation, engaged in the design, construction, overhaul, or repair of nuclear vessels for the United States Navy, including their subsidiary companies, for the conduct of investigations of applications for employment or for access to facilities, by contractors, leased laborers, and other visitors

35. Any employer of individuals whose employment requires that they enter the homes of others, for the purpose of screening individuals who apply for, are offered, or have accepted such employment

36. Public agencies when and as required by federal or state law to investigate (i) applicants as providers of adult foster care and home-based services or (ii) any individual with whom the agency is considering placing an adult on an emergency, temporary, or permanent basis pursuant to § 63.2-1601.1, subject to the restriction that the data shall not be further disseminated by the agency to any party other than a federal or state authority or court as may be required to comply with an express requirement of law for such further dissemination, subject to limitations set out in subsection G

37. The Department of Medical Assistance Services, or its designee, for the purpose of screening individuals who, through contracts, subcontracts, or direct employment, volunteer, apply for, are offered, or have accepted a position related to the provision of transportation services to enrollees in the Medicaid Program or the Family Access to Medical Insurance Security (FAMIS) Program, or any other program administered by the Department of Medical Assistance Services

38. The State Corporation Commission for the purpose of investigating individuals who are current or proposed members, senior officers, directors, and principals of an applicant or person licensed under Chapter 16 (§ 6.2-1600 et seq.) or Chapter 19 (§ 6.2-1900 et seq.) of Title 6.2. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if an application is denied based in whole or in part on information obtained from the Central Criminal Records Exchange pursuant to Chapter 16 or 19 of Title 6.2, the Commissioner of Financial Institutions or his designee may disclose such information to the applicant or its designee

39. The Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation for the purpose of investigating individuals for initial licensure pursuant to § 54.1-2106.1

40. The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired for the purpose of evaluating an individual's fitness for various types of employment and for the purpose of delivering comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services pursuant to Article 11 (§ 51.5-170 et seq.) of Chapter 14 of Title 51.5 that will assist the individual in obtaining employment

41. Bail bondsmen, in accordance with the provisions of § 19.2-120

42. The State Treasurer for the purpose of determining whether a person receiving compensation for wrongful incarceration meets the conditions for continued compensation under § 8.01-195.12

43. The Department of Social Services and directors of local departments of social services for the purpose of screening individuals seeking to enter into a contract with the Department of Social Services or a local department of social services for the provision of child care services for which child care subsidy payments may be provided

44. The Department of Juvenile Justice to investigate any parent, guardian, or other adult members of a juvenile's household when completing a predispositional or postdispositional report required by § 16.1-273 or a Board of Juvenile Justice regulation promulgated pursuant to § 16.1-233

45. The State Corporation Commission, for the purpose of screening applicants for insurance licensure under Chapter 18 (§ 38.2-1800 et seq.) of Title 38.2 and

46. Other entities as otherwise provided by law.

Upon an ex parte motion of a defendant in a felony case and upon the showing that the records requested may be relevant to such case, the court shall enter an order requiring the Central Criminal Records Exchange to furnish the defendant, as soon as practicable, copies of any records of persons designated in the order on whom a report has been made under the provisions of this chapter.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter to the contrary, upon a written request sworn to before an officer authorized to take acknowledgments, the Central Criminal Records Exchange, or the criminal justice agency in cases of offenses not required to be reported to the Exchange, shall furnish a copy of conviction data covering the person named in the request to the person making the request however, such person on whom the data is being obtained shall consent in writing, under oath, to the making of such request. A person receiving a copy of his own conviction data may utilize or further disseminate that data as he deems appropriate. In the event no conviction data is maintained on the data subject, the person making the request shall be furnished at his cost a certification to that effect.

B. Use of criminal history record information disseminated to noncriminal justice agencies under this section shall be limited to the purposes for which it was given and may not be disseminated further.

C. No criminal justice agency or person shall confirm the existence or nonexistence of criminal history record information for employment or licensing inquiries except as provided by law.

D. Criminal justice agencies shall establish procedures to query the Central Criminal Records Exchange prior to dissemination of any criminal history record information on offenses required to be reported to the Central Criminal Records Exchange to ensure that the most up-to-date disposition data is being used. Inquiries of the Exchange shall be made prior to any dissemination except in those cases where time is of the essence and the normal response time of the Exchange would exceed the necessary time period. A criminal justice agency to whom a request has been made for the dissemination of criminal history record information that is required to be reported to the Central Criminal Records Exchange may direct the inquirer to the Central Criminal Records Exchange for such dissemination. Dissemination of information regarding offenses not required to be reported to the Exchange shall be made by the criminal justice agency maintaining the record as required by § 15.2-1722.

E. Criminal history information provided to licensed nursing homes, hospitals and to home care organizations pursuant to subdivision A 15 shall be limited to the convictions on file with the Exchange for any offense specified in §§ 32.1-126.01, 32.1-126.02, and 32.1-162.9:1.

F. Criminal history information provided to licensed assisted living facilities and licensed adult day care centers pursuant to subdivision A 16 shall be limited to the convictions on file with the Exchange for any offense specified in § 63.2-1720.

G. Criminal history information provided to public agencies pursuant to subdivision A 36 shall be limited to the convictions on file with the Exchange for any offense set forth in clause (i) of the definition of barrier crime in § 19.2-392.02.

H. Upon receipt of a written request from an employer or prospective employer, the Central Criminal Records Exchange, or the criminal justice agency in cases of offenses not required to be reported to the Exchange, shall furnish at the employer's cost a copy of conviction data covering the person named in the request to the employer or prospective employer making the request, provided that the person on whom the data is being obtained has consented in writing to the making of such request and has presented a photo-identification to the employer or prospective employer. In the event no conviction data is maintained on the person named in the request, the requesting employer or prospective employer shall be furnished at his cost a certification to that effect. The criminal history record search shall be conducted on forms provided by the Exchange.

I. Nothing in this section shall preclude the dissemination of a person's criminal history record information pursuant to the rules of court for obtaining discovery or for review by the court.

Code 1950, § 19.1-19.2 1966, c. 669 1968, c. 537 1970, c. 118 1975, c. 495 1976, c. 771 1977, c. 626 1978, c. 350 1979, c. 480 1981, c. 207 1985, c. 360 1987, cc. 130, 131 1988, c. 851 1989, c. 544 1990, c. 766 1991, c. 342 1992, cc. 422, 641, 718, 746, 791, 844 1993, cc. 48, 313, 348 1994, cc. 34, 670, 700, 830 1995, cc. 409, 645, 731, 781, 809 1996, cc. 428, 432, 747, 881, 927, 944 1997, cc. 169, 177, 606, 691, 721, 743, 796, 895 1998, cc. 113, 405, 445, 882 1999, cc. 383, 685 2001, cc. 552, 582 2002, cc. 370, 587, 606 2003, c. 731 2005, cc. 149, 914, 928 2006, cc. 257, 277, 644 2007, cc. 12, 361, 495, 572 2008, cc. 387, 689, 863 2009, cc. 667, 813, 840 2010, cc. 189, 340, 406, 456, 524, 563, 862 2011, cc. 432, 449 2012, cc. 40, 189, 386, 476, 507, 803, 835 2013, cc. 165, 176, 261, 407, 491, 582 2014, cc. 225, 454 2015, cc. 38, 343, 540, 730, 758, 770 2016, cc. 454, 554, 574 2017, cc. 421, 431, 809 2018, c. 49 2019, c. 675 2020, cc. 2, 529, 1197, 1248.


World War I

On 14 June 1917, the U.S. Navy acquired her under a free lease from her owner, George H. McNeely of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for use as a Section patrol boat during World War I. She was commissioned the same day as USS Margo (SP-870) with Ensign Rick F. Nowell, USNRF, in command. [4] [5]

Margo was ssigned to the 4th Naval District and based at Philadelphia carrying out patrol duties in the Delaware River area for the rest of World War I and was returned to McNelly on 4 December 1918. [5]


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Research output : Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review

T1 - Stress in the life course

T2 - A life history approach

N2 - This article examines the relationship between stress and distress in the life course, emphasizing the time elapsed between the event and measurement of psychological distress. Stressors are conceptualized as either distal or proximal based on how recently they occurred. Distal stressors are further classified as status changes or undesirable life changes. Using a life history calendar approach, we examine stressors occurring over a 15- year period. We explore whether distal stressors affect current depressive symptomatology above and beyond the effect of more recent stressors and how these stressors vary in frequency and effect over 3 empirically defined age groups. While some events decrease in frequency over age, others occur consistently across age groups. Most important, distal stressors significantly impact current depressive symptomatology, independent of proximal stressors. Types of distal stressors affecting depression vary over age, indicating that the stage of life at which a stressor occurs is a significant determinant of the stressor's effect on depression.

AB - This article examines the relationship between stress and distress in the life course, emphasizing the time elapsed between the event and measurement of psychological distress. Stressors are conceptualized as either distal or proximal based on how recently they occurred. Distal stressors are further classified as status changes or undesirable life changes. Using a life history calendar approach, we examine stressors occurring over a 15- year period. We explore whether distal stressors affect current depressive symptomatology above and beyond the effect of more recent stressors and how these stressors vary in frequency and effect over 3 empirically defined age groups. While some events decrease in frequency over age, others occur consistently across age groups. Most important, distal stressors significantly impact current depressive symptomatology, independent of proximal stressors. Types of distal stressors affecting depression vary over age, indicating that the stage of life at which a stressor occurs is a significant determinant of the stressor's effect on depression.


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In: Nature Reviews Cancer , Vol. 2, No. 5, 05.2002, p. 389-396.

Research output : Contribution to journal › Review article › peer-review

T1 - A history of prostate cancer treatment

N2 - The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today?

AB - The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today?


Learn more about the Acer America ED323QUR Abidpx

Model
Brand Acer
Series ED3
Model ED323QUR Abidpx
Part Number UM.JE3AA.A01
Cabinet Color Black
Bezel Design 3 Sided Frameless
Display
Screen Size 32" (Actual size 31.5")
Widescreen Yes
Glare Screen Non-glare
LED Backlight Yes
Panel VA
Display Type WQHD
Adaptive Sync Technology AMD FreeSync
Recommended Resolution 2560 x 1440 (2K)
Viewing Angle 178° (H) / 178° (V)
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Brightness 250 cd/m2
Contrast Ratio ACM 100,000,000:1 (3,000:1)
Response Time 4ms (GTG)
Display Colors 16.7 Million
Pixel Pitch 0.2724mm
Refresh Rate 144 Hz
Curvature Radius 1800R
Curved Surface Screen Curved
Horizontal Refresh Rate 71 - 214 KHz
Vertical Refresh Rate 48 - 144 Hz
Connectivity
Input Video Compatibility Digital
Connectors DVI (Dual Link), HDMI, DisplayPort
DVI 1
HDMI 1 x HDMI 1.4
DisplayPort 1 x DisplayPort
Power
Power Supply 100 - 240 VAC, 50/60Hz
Power Consumption Energystar Off (typ.): 0.50W
Energystar Sleep (typ.): 0.50W
Energystar On (typ.): 40W
Convenience
Regulatory Approvals MPRII
Stand Adjustments Tilt: -5° to 15°
VESA Compatibility - Mountable 100 x 100mm
Features VisionCare, Flicker-free, Low Dimming, ComfyView, Zero Frame
Usage Consumer
Dimensions &amp Weight
Dimensions (H x W x D) 20.70" x 28.00" x 8.20" w/ stand
16.30" x 28.00" x 3.10" w/o stnad
Weight 13.45 lbs. w/ stand
11.62 lbs. w/o stand
Packaging
Package Contents ED323QUR Abidpx Curved 31.5" WQHD Monitor with AMD Radeon FreeSync
Stand
Power Cord
Display Port Cable
Additional Information
Date First Available January 28, 2019

Pros: Wonderful colors even without adjusting in my opinion. Great image quality and refresh rate. I went from a 32in 60hz 1080p television to this wonderful 32in 144hz 2k monitor. Blown away by the image quality while playing Warframe and Destiny 2!

Cons: Big con. Two dead pixels in the top left corner on arrival. Hugely disapointed by that. Two dead pixels do not qualify for any type of return policy from manufacturer or Newegg. So looks like I am stuck with it. The pixels aren't dead in a location that I notice during normal use but this is infuriating because this seems to be a rising trend for screens from all manufacturers. My new MSI laptop had a dead pixel on arrival as well (not from newegg). I currently have a 10 year old Samsung Syncmaster 2443 that has probably 2000 hours on it and no issues at all. Have to give 3 eggs because of the pixels, but the picture and gaming on this thing is amazing keeping it from a 1 egg.

Overall Review: - If you are on a budget and looking for a great gaming monitor this would be a great option - Fantastic gaming monitor for the price. Changed the way I look at games now and of course built a new rig to match this monitor. - No screen tearing during gaming that I have seen at all while playing Warframe or Destiny 2. - Colors out of the box were great - Comes with a display cable (samsung at same price does not) - Is VSA mountable (samsung at same price is not) - Manufacturers really need to get QC under control for dead pixels

Pros: I wrote this review way past my order date just to sit and test it out. Aside from what the others are disregarding this for, I did not have a problem with it. The colors are easily calibrated (I am using the NVIDIA control panel) by increasing general saturation from 50% up to 70-80%. There was no delay in the shipment, it actually arrived a day earlier than anticipated. The product was well packed, there was no dead pixels on the screen. Like I said, I have tested this before committing to this review. I am a hardcore gamer, despite knowing that this monitor has 4ms response time, you can't hardly tell the difference between this and a 1ms. I had 144hz 1ms 27" before, but this takes the cake with it's 1440 resolution and curved display. The pixel density is really great with a bit more option to sharpen it using the TV's settings in the menu (but I did not coz right out of the box the texts/images are super crisp already) - this will be based on your own preference.

Cons: Only thing, and I knew this before even buying the monitor (only reason I'm putting in CON is maybe some of you will buy this without actually knowing this), the viewing angle is very small. Meaning, if you look at the monitor way above/below your line of sight, the color seems to be washed out. BUT, this is not a CON in my situation since I mainly use this for gaming (who the hell uses 144hz just to watch TV channels only anyways?). So ALL the time I'm using this in my line of sight.

Overall Review: Highly recommended just because of the price, monitor size, color representation and overall aesthetics.

Pros: Very large (32 inches) 144hz VA panel, which while not as good as IPS is still very good Comes with a DisplayPort cable

Cons: In addition to arriving with several dead pixels, the panel started acting strange after about a week of use. The monitor randomly turns itself off and on in the middle of use, and there is some strange artifacting/flashing that occurs near the center of the screen.

Overall Review: When I first got the monitor I was psyched, it seemed like a great deal. But then slowly of the couple days of owning it I started noticing things that were wrong. Mainly the dead pixels, but after about a week it started acting up. I've already started the RMA process, here's hoping the new one will be better.

Pros: I want to put this disclaimer out there. It sucks that people are giving this monitor a bad rating just because it showed up with dead pixels, lines, or hell DoA. It's tech, there is always a possibility of mishandling by carriers or dead on arrival products Every one of those is replaceable or able to be resolved by the vendor themselves. That said.. I bought this monitor around November of 2018. This thing is amazing. It's such a beauty to play on. Especially with the swath of new and vibrant colored games like Anthem, Apex, and Division 2 I can't be awed by the colors. This thing has a lot going for it due to the size and curve naturally, but that 144Hz is awesome and feels good to get to in some games. Resident Evil 2: Remake was a prime example of that. I often sat around 100+Hz with my upgraded rig. I never really noticed much light bleed at all. I'm loving the size of this monitor. I can easily open multiple windows at it's 2540x1440 and comfortably work on stuff. This works out pretty great for me because I run a D&D group and prepping is made easier when I can have multiple Windows up and visible. Now I am not getting the full benefit of the monitor since I have a gtx1080 and this is a freesync monitor, but I am enjoying it none-the-less.

Cons: None. In fact I advised a friend of mine to pick it up and he loves it as well.

Overall Review: Definitely would buy a second or third one.

Pros: - HUGE! - Nearly no bezels. - Good viewing angles, not quite IPS tier angles, but you're more than likely gonna be sitting directly in front of it anyways, especially with the curve it has. - Got it for a steal at $299. - Fast shipping! Arrived before I expected it to! - VESA mountable (there's a con here too though - Stand snaps in to back of monitor making it easy to take it off or put it on - Bright screen - Excellent response time, even for a 4ms panel - High refresh rate - Did I mention it's HUGE!? - ZERO dead pixels that I could find. -Peeling the giant protective sheet of plastic off the back of the panel was extremely satisfying - OSD is easy to navigate, depressable thumbstick on the back of the screen is actually pretty intuitive. - Full color calibration. 6 axis color and 6 axis saturate

Cons: - Stand is a bit flimsy - No height adjust on stand - VESA mounting is recessed in to the monitor by about a quarter inch, so not all mounts will work (seriously what was the point of that!?) - Where the stand mounts in to the monitor is not centered on the back of the monitor, it's actually about 2/3rds down from the top. -Doesnt come with screws for mounting it on another stand - Color isn't that great on the panel, but it's fine for gaming - The built in Speaker(s) is absolute garbage. It's quiet and tinny and just overall kind of pathetic. My guess is you're probably not going to be using it anyways, so that's not too big of a con.

Overall Review: I would 110% recommend this monitor to my friends, if they're only mostly using it for gaming or streaming. I'm a gamer myself and occasionally decide to stream for friends that want to watch. I had to push it all the way to the back of my desk because it's so big it felt like it was right in my face compared to the 24" monitor I also have that is now my second monitor. Overall, if you can find this thing for less than $400, it's a steal and a great addition to any gaming setup.

Pros: Huge curved screen is great. The 144hz is super fast and smooth. Seemingly great for the price. Love the OSD controls, more companies should use the joystick style instead of the buttons.

Cons: The ghosting/smearing was too much. After playing a handful of games, the ghosting and smearing was distractingly bad and really took me out of the game. I attempted to mitigate the issue with FreeSync on/off, different overdrive settings, different cables, and updated drivers. Nothing fixed the issue, but some settings helped. I may have gotten a dud or my eyes are too sensitive to it. I had 2 dead pixels, side-by-side, near the top of the monitor. They far up enough that I never noticed them in normal operation. Finally, the stand is very basic and the color reproduction was underwhelming. The monitor comes pre-set to "warm" and really wants to keep going back to the "warm" setting. If you get this, remember to adjust the colors immediately.

Overall Review: I would not recommend this monitor. This is the low end of that "144hz 1440p FreeSync non-TN" monitor range and it shows. Since you will potentially be looking at this for multiple hours, its worth a bit more money to get something better.

Pros: Seemed like a great deal. I guess that is a pro till the lines showed up.

Cons: Tried various troubleshooting steps, but found that even with nothing plugged into the monitor but the power cord, there were horizontal lines on the screen. Only had the monitor for 2 months. Factory reset did not help or any other settings in the menu could make them go away.

Pros: - 32" curved screen -1440p 144hz @ $299 on sale - Vesa compatible, table stand also looks nice. - Freesync - DP and pass through sound are a plus.

Cons: - Had a stuck pixel just off center of the MIDDLE OF THE SCREEN! It could have been anywhere else, but nope, right in the middle, stuck on green. - The way components are packed into the box, part of the stand went flying when i slid everything out of the box.

Overall Review: - I plan to send acer an email for support once I register the warranty tonight, but I've never bought a monitor like this before and it was just very very disappointing to see the stuck pixel as soon as I turned it on. It's less noticeable when gaming, but with any dark / blacks on the screen the pixel is just screaming at me right in the middle. - From what i've read, newegg doesn't care about dead pixels for RMA and seeing that acer does not respond to reviews about dead pixels, I am worried I've chosen the wrong brand monitor. Time will tell.